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  • 1.
    Berntsson, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Blom, Hans
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Cuenot, Philippe
    Siemens VDO.
    Donandt, Jörg
    Daimler AG.
    Eklund, Ulrich
    Volvo Cars.
    Freund, Ulrich
    ETAS GmbH.
    Frey, Patrick
    ETAS GmbH.
    Gérard, Sébastien
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Jansson, Pontus
    Mecel AB.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Mentor Graphics Corp..
    Lönn, Henrik
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Reiser, Mark-Oliver
    Technical University of Berlin.
    Selin, Dennis
    Volvo Cars.
    Servat, David
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Tessier, Patrick
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Reiser, Mark-Oliver
    Technical University of Berlin.
    Törner, Fredrik
    Volvo Car Corp..
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Weber, Matthias
    Carmeq GmbH.
    EAST-ADL 2.0 Specification2008Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This specification of the EAST ADL 2.0 is based on the EAST-ADL developed in the EAST EEA projectand has been further refined and harmonized with on-going modelling appraches in the automotiveindustry. It presents the modeling infrastructure, i.e. how the modeling elements should be represented inthe language and the UML representation. For each package a usage example is provided.The EAST-ADL 2.0 is harmonized with AUTOSAR.The metamodel and UML profile of EAST ADL 2.0 is defined in two steps: A domain (automotive)metamodel is defined, capturing only the domain specific needs of the language, without adding the UML2details. The basic concepts of UML are used for this purpose, such as classes, compositions andassociations. Based on the domain metamodel, a UML2 profile for the domain metamodel is defined,specifying stereotypes with properties and constraints.Comments on the content of this document are welcomed, and should be directed to <coordinator@atesst.org>.Please download the latest available specification and the XMI file ready for use in UML2 tools from the <atesst.org> website.

  • 2.
    Biehl, Matthias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    A modular tool integration approach: experiences from two case studies2010In: 3rd Workshop on Model-driven tool and Process Integration (MDTPI2010), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    In the model-driven development process of automotive embedded systems a number of specialized tools are used to support various development tasks. Each tool needs to work seamlessly with artifacts created by other tools to increase the efficiency of development. We identify desirable properties for integrating the data of different tools. We then propose an approach for decomposing the data integration into modular steps that fulfill these properties. We report our experiences from applying this approach to integrate simulation capabilities and functionality for safety analysis into a model-based development environment.

  • 3.
    Blom, Hans
    et al.
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Lönn, Henrik
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Hagl, Frank
    Continental Automotive DE.
    Papadopoulos, Yiannis
    University of Hull.
    Reiser, Mark-Oliver
    Technical University of Berlin.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Tagliabo, Fulvio
    Centro Ricerche Fiat S.C.p.A..
    Torchiaro, Sandra
    Centro Ricerche Fiat S.C.p.A..
    Tucci-Piergiovanni, Sara
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Tavakoli Kolagari, Ramin
    Nuremberg Institute of Technology.
    EAST-ADL: An Architecture Description Language for Automotive Software-Intensive Systems2013In: Embedded Computing Systems: Applications, Optimization, and Advanced Design / [ed] M. Khalgui, O. Mosbahi, & A. Valentini, Hershey: Information Science Reference, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EAST-ADL is an Architecture Description Language (ADL) initially defined in several European-funded research projects and subsequently refined and aligned with the more recent AUTOSAR automotive standard. It provides a comprehensive approach for defining automotive electronic systems through an information model that captures engineering information in a standardized form. Aspects covered include vehicle features, requirements, analysis functions, software and hardware components, and communication. The representation of the system’s implementation is not defined in EAST-ADL itself but by AUTOSAR. However, traceability is supported from EAST-ADL’s lower abstraction levels to the implementation level elements in AUTOSAR. In this chapter, the authors describe EAST-ADL in detail, show how it relates to AUTOSAR as well as other significant automotive standards, and present current research work on using EAST-ADL in the context of fully-electric vehicles, the functional safety standard ISO 26262, and for multi-objective optimization.

  • 4.
    Cuenot, Philippe
    et al.
    Siemens VDO.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Gérard, Sébastien
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Lönn, Henrik
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Reiser, Mark-Oliver
    Technical University of Berlin.
    Servat, David
    CEA List , Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Tavakoli Kolagari, Ramin
    Technical University of Berlin.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Weber, Matthias
    Carmeq GmbH.
    Managing Complexity of Automotive Electronics Using the EAST-ADL2007In: 12TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING COMPLEX COMPUTER SYSTEMS, PROCEEDINGS, IEEE Computer Society, 2007, p. 353-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of embedded automotive systems calls for a more rigorous approach to system development compared to current state of practice. A critical issue is the management of the engineering information that defines the embedded system. Development time, cost efficiency, quality and dependability all benefit from appropriate information management. System modeling based on an architecture description language is a way to keep the engineering information within one information structure. The EAST-ADL was developed in the EAST-EEA project (www.easteea.net) and is an architecture description language for automotive embedded systems. It is currently refined in the ATESSTproject (www.atesst.org). This paper gives an overview of the EAST-ADL and accounts for some recent refinements as developed in the ATESST project. Areas covered include the relation to other standardization initiatives such as UML2.0, AADL, AUTOSAR, SysML, Marte profile, requirements management and variability.

  • 5.
    Cuenot, Philippe
    et al.
    Siemens VDO, France .
    Frey, Patrik
    ETAS Gmbh.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Mentor Graphics, Sweden .
    Lönn, Henrik
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Engineering support for automotive embedded systems: beyond Autosar2008In: FISITA World Automotive Congress 2008, Congress Proceedings - Electronics: Volume 6, 2008, p. 180-189Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future de-facto standard for automotive electric/electronic (E/E) architectures, AUTOSAR (1), is becoming more and more mature. In December 2007 there has been a release of the version 3.0, and automotive OEMs are already using AUTOSAR technology in their series production projects. Even though there has been an evolution of which engineering information and concepts are part of AUTOSAR and there are still things to be defined, there will always be a number of issues outside the scope of this standardization initiative. As AUTOSAR has become a de facto standard, there is an obvious possibility now to define general systems engineering concepts complementary to and thus going beyond the current AUTOSAR specifications. In this paper we describe the advantages of having an integrated architecture description language (ADL) specific for the development of E/E systems in the automotive domain. We present the core concepts for such an integrated ADL which targets an overall systems engineering approach: the EAST-ADL2. The original EAST-ADL was developed in the EAST-EEA project (7) and basic concepts were reused in the AUTOSAR standardization initiative. Lately, the original EAST-ADL has been refined and extended in the ATESST project (www.atesst.org) to EAST-ADL2. The EAST-ADL2 conceptually integrates and links engineering information related to multiple engineering disciplines such as product line engineering, requirements engineering, control engineering, software engineering, safety engineering and real-time systems engineering. The ADL docs not prescribe a specific development process and it lends itself to top-down, bottom-up and middle-out development approaches and methods. As a central part, the EAST-ADL2 defines a system model which is organized in parts representing different levels of abstraction, reflecting different views and levels of details of the vehicle E/E architecture. By identifying AUTOSAR as belonging to only one certain level of abstraction, namely the implementation level, we also show that there is a way to define complementary ADL concepts without interfering with AUTOSAR. These describe engineering information that is more abstract, with different engineering focus and thus - from the EAST-ADL2 perspective - on different levels of abstraction.

  • 6.
    Larses, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Redell, Ola
    ENEA AB.
    Experiences from Model supported Configuration Management and Production of Automotive Embedded Software2007In: SAE World Congress & Exhibition, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Configuration management of products containing software with complex interrelationships is a challenge for the automotive industry. Configurations are usually addressed through hierarchical product structures based on a mechanical tradition. We report experiences from the development of a demonstrator: a scale model truck, including a software platform, active safety functionality and a tool environment. Our experiences in particular indicate that commercial Product Data Management (PDM) systems meet the needs for embedded software configuration management, providing improved traceability, configuration and production support for in-vehicle software. The software middleware provides execution independent of location, facilitating portability. Supplemented with an adapted PDM solution this provides efficient configuration support. The need for analysis support for the timing behavior of distributed applications was identified but not implemented. We conclude by discussing experiences and future opportunities with the demonstrator.

  • 7.
    Persson, Jan-Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Automotive Fuel Cell System Simulation, Component and Compressor modeling2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Persson, Jonas G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power Systems.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Chen, De-Jiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Automotive fuel cell system simulation, component and compressor modelling2006In: Schrauben-maschinen 2006: Kompressoren, Lader, Motoren, Vakuumpumpen = compressors, superchargers, engines, vavuum pumps: Tagung Dortmund, 26 und 27 September 2006, VDI Gesellschaft Fahrzeug- und Verkehrstechnik , 2006, no 1932, p. 217-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future fuel cell (FC) systems for automotive applications will significantly depend on the development and realization of efficient and reliable components. The screw compressor for charging of the FC stack constitutes one important component in the system. In the European project NFCCPP (Numerical Fuel Cell Component Performance Prediction tool) within the EC 5th FP, a modular simulation environment has been developed which allows virtual testing of components of fuel cell systems. The objective of this development was to create a useful tool for automotive component suppliers to test their component or subsystem models for performance prediction in a realistic FC system environment, for relevant driving cycles. MATLAB/Simulink, being well established in industry, was chosen as software platform for the modelling. The system model structure, interface definitions and data flows, as well as different approaches to the modelling of screw compressors, will be presented in this paper. Component models of different degree of detail will be possible to plug into the system model. A standard reference model is based on simplified component models. In particular, there have been two main issues for the development of this system: Lumped models or characteristics approach. Simplified component models will be required to allow for acceptable computing time for system simulation. This is even more important if the system should be used with hardware in the loop, i.e. for real time simulation. Code protection. Preventing access to confidential information and data of other component suppliers was considered necessary. Even competitors can then test their components together in such an environment. Three different approaches have been taken to this: Centralised simulation with remote user control. Localised simulation with simulation-time model usage control. Parallel distributed simulation. Compressor models. The complete screw compressor unit, also including electric motor and control system for capacity (speed) control has been modelled in NFCCPP. For a simple compressor model, empirical test data in the form of screw compressor maps for one specific machine type and size could be used. To generalize, screw compressor maps could be transformed by means of similarity laws for scaling. A more detailed screw compressor model should be based on the lumped approach according to the since long well established model structure; a number of compression chambers connected by leakage paths. Building a lumped screw compressor model in Simulink has been tested. Compressor flow field models of CFD element type are however not considered realistic as component models for the complex FC system simulation. In some FC systems, screw expanders are also used, for energy recovery. The FC system model can be configured to include also an expander. The commercialisation of this program system is being planned for.

  • 9.
    Qureshi, Tahir Naseer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Pessson, Magnus
    Chen, De-Jiu
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    Towards Harmonizing MultipleArchitecture Description Languages for Real-Time Embedded Systems2011In: Real-Time in Sweden (RTiS), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity of real-time embedded systems requires appropriate methods and techniques to support the development including the specification and analysis of different architectural aspects. A large number of architectural description languages (ADL) have been proposed with varying focus and application domains. There is a need for harmonization of these ADLs. This can be from develoloping and  understanding of how they differ or could be synergistically combined for increasing the overall development efficiency and fulfilling the ever increasing functional and non-functional requirements on a system. This paper addresses this issue and focuses on four different ADLs: EAST-ADL, AUTOSAR, AADL and Rubus[MT1] . In this work we compare these ADLs, identify possible usage scenarios involving more than one ADL and discuss some of the underlying challenges. A representative industrial case study of a brake-by-wire system is used to support the work.

     

  • 10.
    Shi, Jianlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Servat, David
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Lönn, H.
    Combined usage of UML and Simulink in the Design of Embedded Systems: Investigating Scenarios and Structural and Behavioural Mapping2007In: On the 4th workshop of ObjectorientedModeling of Embedded Real-time Systems, Paderborn, Germany, Oct. 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multidisciplinary nature of advanced embed-ded systems requires a combined usage of several tools and modeling languages in systems develop-ment. We investigate the needs and some of the pos-sibilities in simultaneous usage of Matlab/Simulink and UML. Structural and behavioral mappings are explored considering the needs for models at differ-ent abstraction level as well as environment models. The representation and mapping between behavioral models, including discrete-time, event-triggered, and continuous time systems is of special concern and solutions are discussed

  • 11.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Modeling and Simulation of Physical Systems in a Mechatronic Context2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis gives different views on the modeling and simulation of physical systems, especially together with embedded systems, forming mechatronic systems. The main considered application domain is automotive. One motivation behind the work is to find suitable representations of physical systems to be used in an architectural description language for automotive embedded systems, EAST-ADL2, which is implemented as a UML2 profile, and uses concepts from both UML and SysML. As a part of the thesis, several languages and tools are investigated, including bond graphs, MATLAB/Simulink, Ptolemy II, Modelica, MATLAB/Simscape and SysML. For SysML, the modeling of continuous-time systems and how it relates to MATLAB/Simulink and Modelica is evaluated. A case study of an electric power assisted steering is modeled to show the differences, the similarities and the usage of the above mentioned languages and tools. To be able to classify the tools and languages, five realization levels were developed:

    • Physical modeling models
    • Constraint models
    • Continuous causal models
    • Discretized models
    • Discretized models with solver and platform implementation

    By using these realization levels, models, tools and modeling languages can be classified, and transformations between them can be set up and analyzed. As a result, a method to describe the simulation behavior of a MATLAB/Simulink model has been developed using SysML activity diagrams as an approach to achieve integrated system models. Another result is an evaluation of the parametric diagrams of SysML for continuous-time modeling, which shows that they do not enable “physical modeling”, i.e. modeling the topology of the system and getting the underlying equations out of this topology. By including physical ports and physical connectors to SysML internal block diagrams, this could be solved. The comparison also shows many similarities between the languages. The results led to a more detailed investigation on conjugate variables, such as force and velocity, and electric current and voltage, and how these are treated in various languages. The thesis also includes two industrial case studies: one of a twin-screw compressor, and one of a simulation environment for automotive fuel-cell systems. Conclusions are drawn from these models, referring to the realization levels.

  • 12.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Modelling of displacement compressors using MATLAB/Simulink software2004In: Proceedings of norddesign 2004 - product development in changing environment, TAMPERE: TAMPERE UNIV TECH PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY , 2004, p. 192-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Model based development is increasingly used to minimise costly and time consuming testing of physical prototypes during product development. Modelling and concept evaluation by using computer models for performance prediction will then be a substantial part of the PD process synthesis-analysis loop. However, easy-to-use and flexible methods have to be used for modelling, especially during product concept development, to avoid traditional coding and debugging. In this case, a twin-screw compressor has been modelled using the visual programming language MATLAB/Simulink. One of the objectives was to investigate whether it was feasible and appropriate to use MATLAB/Simulink for such a complex task. New developed methods have been used for this. The main difficulty turned out to be how to create a queue-like environment for the chambers. This problem was eventually solved, but it shows how MATLAB/Simulink can be cumbersome to use when dealing with complex problems.

  • 13.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    On the modular modelling for dynamical simulation with application to fluid systems2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis highlights some topics on modular modelling for dynamical simulation with application to fluid systems. The results are based on experience from the development of the fuel cell component simulation environment NFCCPP. The general application is cross-enterprise simulation of technical systems. There are four main topics: component definition including selection of interfaces, lumped modelling of fluid components, the use of dynamical equations to reduce simulation time in large systems and methods of to protect the intellectual property (IP) of a component.

    An overview of different dynamical fluid simulation tools such as HOPSAN, MATLAB/Simulink and Easy5 is presented. Special focus is on interfaces, where different approaches for representing interfaces are presented using an illustrative example. Selecting interfaces is however not a separated task from how to set up and solve the underlying equations, which also is shown. Equations to model a lumped component are derived, to get a mathematical background to what problems there are to solve. These equations are derived especially to be applicable in block model software simulation tools such as MATLAB/Simulink. The equations are also compared with the bond-graph approach of representing dynamical systems. A twinscrew compressor is modelled in MATLAB/Simulink as an implementation of these equations. A method to decrease the simulation time in dynamical fluid system is also presented. The technique is to add virtual mass in the force equation to get a slower acceleration of the fluid. Using this slower response, it is possible to use larger time-steps when integrating the equations and thus the total simulation time can be reduced. The error introduced using this method is a modelling error in the time domain, and it is comparable with using unit transmission lines (UTL:s), as does HOPSAN.

    The protection of the intellectual property (IP) of a component model is presented. The concept of clamping is thoroughly explained, as it often is overlooked in conventional IPprotection. Three concepts for code protection are presented: “Centralised simulation with remote user control”, “Localised simulation with simulation-time model usage control” and “Parallel distributed simulation”. The NFCCPP implementation of the concept “Localised simulation with simulation-time model usage control” is presented in more detail.

  • 14.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    The design of modular dynamical fluid simulation systems2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview of methods for simulation of dynamical fluid systems. Typical applications for such simulations are the design of pneumatic and hydraulic systems, internal combustion engines, cooling systems, and air management systems for fuel cells. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are presented and from them the one-dimensional lumped governing equations are derived. Different methods for solving systems of interconnected components are presented: the state-space/bond-graph method, transmission line modelling, and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods. Finally a method to solve the problems using the fully dynamical equations is presented. The method is to use the bond-graph method to systemise the system, and then add virtual mass to the dynamical equation in order to make the simulation system faster to solve. Results from the verification of this are presented in the results section of this paper.

  • 15.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Virtual Component Testing for PEM Fuel Cell Systems:An Efficient, High-Quality and Safe Approach forSuppliers and OEM´s2005In: 3rd European PEFC Forum, Session B09, 7July, 09:15h, File No. B092, 2005, p. 103-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The successful introduction of fuel cell systems for future generation automotiveapplications will significantly depend on the development and realization of reliable lowcost components, which have to be highly integrated in the fuel cell system.Hence, in the course of the project NFCCPP (Numerical Fuel Cell ComponentPerformance Prediction tool) funded by the European Union, a simulation environment hasbeen worked out and a modular component tool box created, which allows the – virtual –testing of components of fuel cell systems in a highly realistic, most advanced and precise,but nevertheless confidential simulation environment. Confidentiality – in fact modelprotection - enables the combination of best state of the art simulation modules fromdifferent partners in an overall system simulation model without having access toconfidential information and data of other individual components. Even competitors cantest their components together in such an environment. Moreover, this approach enablesinvestigations based on overall system simulations (or a fixed set thereof), which have theadvantage of providing a sound reference for comparing results.

  • 16.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Cuenot, Philiipe
    Continental.
    Frey, Patrick
    ETAS.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Mentor Graphics.
    Lönn, Henrik
    Volvo Technology.
    Servat, David
    CEA.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Developing Dependable Automotive Embedded Systemsusing the EAST-ADL; representing continuous timesystems in SysML2007In: EOOLT 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Equation-Based Object-Oriented Languages and Tools, In Conjunction with ECOOP 2007, 2007, p. 25-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The architectural description language for automotive embedded systems EAST-ADL is presented in this paper. The aim of the EAST-ADL language is to provide a comprehensive systems modeling approach as a means to keep the engineering information within one structure. This facilitatessystems integration and enables consistent systems analysis. The EAST-ADL encompasses structural information at different abstraction levels, requirements and variability modeling. The EAST-ADL is implemented as a UML2 profileand is harmonized with AUTOSAR and a subset of SysML. Currently, differentways to model behavior natively in the language are investigated. An approachfor using SysML parametric diagrams to describe equations in composed physical systems is proposed. An example system is modeled and discussed. Itis highlighted that parametric diagrams lacks support for separation between effort and flow variables, and why this separation would be desired in order tomodel composed physical systems. An alternative approach by use of SysML activity diagrams is also discussed.

  • 17.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Shi, Jianlin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ahlsten, Viktor
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Mapping Simulink to UML in the design of embedded systems:Investigating scenarios and transformations2008In: OMER4 Post-proceedings, 2008, 2008, p. 137-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multidisciplinary nature of advanced embedded systems requires a combined usage of several tools and modeling languages in systems development.We investigate the needs and some of the possibilities of combined usage of Simulink and UML.Structural and behavioral mappings are explored focusing on continuous-time and discrete-time models.A procedure for transforming Simulink models to UML composite structure and activity models is presented. Our proposed behavioral transformationmaps behavior of the Simulink model as well as the MATLAB/Simulink simulation engine and provides an explicit simulation level behavior representation in the form of UML activity diagrams. The transformation has been partially implemented using the Atlas Transformation Language.

  • 18.
    Sjöstedt, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Flemmer, Henrik
    Scania CV AB.
    Evaluation of Auxiliary Device Efficiency in Heavy Vehicle Application2013In: Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the energy consumption related to auxiliary devices, as a basis for optimizing the auxiliary systems’ layout and identifying potential for fuel consumption reduction, a study has been carried out at Scania CV AB. The following auxiliary devices have been investigated: Alternator, water pump, cooling fan, air compressor, air conditioning compressor, oil pump and power steering pump. Those auxiliary devices represent 5–7% of the total fuel consumption in long haulage truck applications, while for a city bus the figure could be as high as 50%. One of the challenges of evaluating the fuel consumption of auxiliary devices is the variance: it depends on many factors including road data, driver profile, ambient conditions (temperature, pres- sure, precipitation) and more. To investigate this variance, test data collected from the Scania test fleet has been analyzed. The data are used as input to a MATLAB/Simulink model of the aux- iliary systems. This way, a large population of trucks has been investigated, for many driving cycles under realistic conditions. A general model for reducing fuel consumption for auxiliary sys- tems has been developed.

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