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  • 1.
    Frichot, Hélène
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    In Captivity: The Real Estate of Co-Living2017In: Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies / [ed] Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, and Helen Runting, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 140-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Frichot, Hélène
    et al.
    Runting, Helen
    The Promise of a Lack: Responding to (Her) Real-Estate Career2015In: The Avery Review, Vol. 13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architectures of the Unbuilt Environment2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis offers a critical theorization of architecture’s shifting orientations towards the lives that it inevitably shapes and molds. The fourteen essays that comprise this thesis address a range of seemingly superficial transformations in architecture’s disciplinary landscape, which occur in Sweden in the second decade of the twenty-first century. When viewed in aggregate, these transformations point to a decisive shift in what architecture does, evidencing phases of withdrawal (through deregulations and enclosures) and facilitation (through exercises in projection and connection), ultimately suggesting the arrival of a condition that I refer to as the unbuilt environment, wherein the project replaces the building as architecture’s primary outcome.

     

    Through this doctoral research, architecture is also examined as a key technology in the neoliberal project. A discipline that is vested in the production of subjects and environments, architecture is shown here to draw, write, and dream forth a vast range of “container technologies” that enclose, move, shape, support, and produce us as subjects, facilitating certain kinds of lives and not others, from the interior out. 

     

    The research was motivated by the need to find the words to think, write, transform, and even negate what architecture was doing, when it was doing what it was doing, to lives led and to life itself, in the architectural present. My aim was always to produce thick, transformative, and essayistic theorizations of the state of things, which would be operative in a critical register. I also wanted to show, that the present constitutes a crucial site for the making of architectural theory. In running alongside and in excess of architectural practice, critical architectural theory, I argue, can produce a space for a yet-un-thought architecture: an architecture that might aspire to facilitate life at the scale of the population.

  • 4.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Desire for Democracy2018In: Aiming for Democratic Architecture / [ed] Tove Dumon Wallsten, Stockholm: Svenska Institutet and MYCKET , 2018, p. 6-8Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Let the Right One In2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The Illusory Autonomy of the Real Estate Interior2018In: Rethinking the Social—Making Effects / [ed] Sten Gromark, Jennifer Mack, and Roemer van Toorn, Barcelona and New York: ACTAR, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The Long Nineties: Reassessing ‘A Complex Order’ in Semiocapitalism2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Vertigo2015In: LO-RES, Vol. 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Vertigo2015In: LO-RES, p. 57-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Welcome to The Promenade City: A Gentrifictional Cartography of Stockholm in the Postindustrial Age'2015In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 397-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As we enter the age of cognitive capitalism and immaterial labor, postindustrial cities like Stockholm, Sweden, are witnessing both the emergence of a post-regulatory planning policy climate and the concomitant transfer of responsibilities for design regulation and housing provision from the municipality to distributed networks of producer-consumers. As governments effectively withdraw from direct engagement in city building efforts, new divisions of labor and new forms of control thus become apparent. This essay considers the implications of these shifts by addressing the “gentrifictions” through which they operate. Deploying notions of “chora” and “container technologies” as they have been developed through the feminist scholarship of Luce Irigaray and Zoë Sofia, we ultimately advocate a radical rethinking of our relation to the unobtrusive ‘environments’ that facilitate our (compulsorily productive) experiences of the city and our participation in real-estate games of occupation and exchange.

  • 11.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    White, Wide and Scattered: Picturing (Her) Housing Career2016In: This Thing Called Theory / [ed] Teresa Stoppani, Giorgio Ponzo, George Themistokleous, London: Taylor & Francis, 2016, p. 231-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is in the seductive space of real estate that finance and architecture find the space to flirt, collaborating on the shaping of brains, minds, and bodies through biopolitical and noological processes of subject formation, of assujettissement. Our real estate “choices” — it is as choices that they are presented to us as too often ingenuousaffect addled consumers — are conditioned by exposure to image worlds that over-determine how interior environmental niches are carved out, and how subjects and environments are co-produced.

    The phenomenon of contemporary real estate also includes the rise of the entrepreneurial subject that we, with an irreverent nod to Maurizio Lazzarato’s formulation, call the ‘indebted woman’. Who is this ‘indebted woman’ and how has she come to be captured by the curated interior environments of contemporary real-estate? We will argue that the aesthetic figure of the ‘indebted woman’, who we frame for the purposes of our polemic, is diagrammatically captured in three ways: 1. By a milieu of ubiquitous whiteness producing the illusion of an infinitely receding horizon of possibilities; 2. By the recurring motifs of designerly objects placed so as to appear casually scattered, producing a mood of restlessness, a potential of mobility that endlessly defers a capacity to settle in and really make herself at home; 3. By the wide-angle framing of the real-estate image, which encloses her in a co-productive exchange between curated interior and ‘point of view’, with the result of over-determining her subjectivity as a biopolitically and noologically subjected subject. [HR1] Our[HF2]  plan is to picture these diagrams of capture, all of which are amply illustrated in the professionally produced real-estate imagery that provides content for real-estate websites like hemnet.se, booli.se, design blogs, and the real-estate pages of the daily press. WAs such, we propose to picture the ‘housing career’ of the indebted woman, and to do this we will take recourse to a fledgling theoretical framework we denominate feminist real-estate theory. We use this formulation as both a provocation, and to test what can be achieved with this ‘thing called theory’. Whether this theory will prove to be merely a tool of analysis, or else a means of critically projecting into what otherwise risks being a foreclosed future, is an issue, the risks and promises of which, we hope to discuss in our closing remarks.

  • 12.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Röing Baer, Arthur
    A City of Bits and Atoms2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Röing Baer, Arthur
    A City of Bits and Atoms2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Sjögrim, Rutger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Torisson, Fredrik
    Pop Theory: The Architecture of Late Night Shopping2017In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 513-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inviting audiences into the late-night, precarious world of (photo) shopping, we explore the way in which the ghostly figures of the Photoshop world - its exhausted architects, indebted consumers, and the two-dimensional cut-outs that populate its spaces - are all put to use in a project of producing subjectivities through environments. Feminist critiques of visuality provide a basis in understanding the play between bodies and worlds that set this production in motion. By looking at the mechanics of "pre-occupation" that allow us to inhabit such images, we speculate: could a re-theorization of this most commercial of "extra-architectural services" (visualization) allow the activity of shopping be put to more radical use?

  • 15.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Torisson, Fredrik
    Lund tekniska högskolan.
    Anticipation and Other Affective Productions: Theorizing the Architectural Project in Action2018In: After Effects: Theories and Methodologies in Architectural Research / [ed] Hélène Frichot with Gunnar Sandin and Bettina Schwalm, New York and Barcelona: ACTAR, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Torisson, Fredrik
    Managing the Not-Yet: The Architectural Project Under Semiocapitalism2017In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under conditions of semiocapitalism - wherein signs, rather than goods or even services, are the main output of abstract production - the architectural "project" has become the primary technology for organizing architectural labor. The project, we argue, also acts as a capture device capable of linking economic production and the production of subjectivity, facilitating both the reproduction of (architectural) labor, on the one hand, and the financing of schemes, on the other. Both outcomes, we posit, are dependent on the production of anticipatory affects that imbue legitimacy by citing the past and factoring in the future.

  • 17.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Torisson, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    YES Boss! The 8 house: Towards a projective critique2015In: Drawing On, ISSN 2059-9978, Vol. 1, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing of postmodernism, Fredric Jameson locates the (postmodern) desire for architecture in its image. Alloy- like, the architecture of the early twenty-first century amalgamates image and material structure and in so doing sprawls simultaneously across the spaces of media and the city. From concept diagram to post-occupancy photograph, the building is now both preceded and augmented by a distributed array of high-resolution images. A brand from the moment of inception, the “distributed form” of the contemporary architectural project in fact seems carefully designed to facilitate its on-going dissemination. It is this relation – that of architecture to its image – which this essay critically addresses, exploring what it is that such projects actually project, and how we might – as architects and critics – critically engage with that content. 

1 - 17 of 17
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