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  • 1.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Glycosci Chem, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spruce hemicelluloses (galactoglucomannan and arabinoglucuronoxylan): Interplay with cellulose and lignin in softwoods2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Quero, Amparo Jimenez
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Giummarella, Nicola
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of the molecular structure of wood hemicelluloses on the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Quero, Amparo Jimenez
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Rudjito, Reskandi C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Ruthes, Andrea C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Extraction of distinct populations of bioactive arabinoxylans from wheat bran using sequential chemo-enzymatic processes2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ramos, Marina
    et al.
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Burgos, Nuria
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Barnard, Almero
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Evans, Gareth
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Preece, James
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Graz, Michael
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Ruthes, Andrea C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain.;Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Ngoc, Long Pham
    Brouwer, Abraham
    BioDetect Syst Bv, Sci Pk 406, NL-1098 XH Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Burg, Bart
    BioDetect Syst Bv, Sci Pk 406, NL-1098 XH Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    del Carmen Garrigos, Maria
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Jimenez, Alfonso
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Agaricus bisporus and its by-products as a source of valuable extracts and bioactive compounds2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 292, p. 176-187Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edible mushrooms constitute an appreciated nutritional source for humans due to their low caloric intake and their high content in carbohydrates, proteins, dietary fibre, phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. It has been also demonstrated that mushrooms have health-promoting benefits. Cultivation of mushrooms, especially of the most common species Agaricus bisporus, represents an increasingly important food industry in Europe, but with a direct consequence in the increasing amount of by-products from their industrial production. This review focuses on collecting and critically investigating the current data on the bioactive properties of Agaricus bisporus as well as the recent research for the extraction of valuable functional molecules from this species and its by-products obtained after industrial processing. The state of the art regarding the antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-allergenic and dietary compounds will be discussed for novel applications such as nutraceuticals, additives for food or cleaning products.

  • 5.
    Requena, Raquel
    et al.
    Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Food Engn Dev, E-46022 Valencia, Spain.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Vargas, Maria
    Moriana Torro, Rosana
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Mol Sci, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chiralt, Amparo
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Integral Fractionation of Rice Husks into Bioactive Arabinoxylans, llulose Nanocrystals, and Silica Particles2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 6275-6286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rice husk is an important agricultural by-product that has not been exploited yet to full capacity for advanced applications. The feasibility of obtaining high-value products such as bioactive hemicelluloses and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from rice husk is here demonstrated in a cascade biorefinery process using subcritical water extraction (SWE) prior to bleaching and acid hydrolysis and compared to traditional alkali pretreatments. The proposed SWE process enables the isolation of bioactive arabinoxylans with phenolic acid moieties, thus preserving their antioxidant and anti- bacterial properties that are lost during alkaline conditions. Bioactive Additionally, SWE can be combined with subsequent arabinoxylan Silica particles bleaching and acid hydrolysis to obtain CNCs with large aspect ratio, high crystallinity, and thermal stability. The hydrothermal process also enables the recovery of silica particles that are lost during the alkali step but can be recovered after the isolation of the CNCs. Our biorefinery strategy results in the integral valorization of rice husk into their molecular components (bioactive arabinoxylans, cellulose nanocrystals, and silica particles), which can be used as additives for food applications and as reinforcing agents in biocomposite materials, respectively.

  • 6.
    Rudjito, Reskandi C.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Ruthes, Andrea C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Feruloylated Arabinoxylans from Wheat Bran: Optimization of Extraction Process and Validation at Pilot Scale2019In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 15, p. 13167-13177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extraction of feruloylated arabinoxylan (AX) from wheat bran was optimized in terms of the pretreatments prior to subcritical water extraction and then validated at the pilot scale. Destarching of wheat bran was critical to improve the yields and purity of the extracted AX. Time evolution profiles from sequential extractions revealed differences in the extractability of different polysaccharides, whereby beta-D-glucans were first extracted followed by AX. At longer extraction times, the AX population was more substituted and more uniform in terms of molar mass distribution. Validation of the process at pilot scale (with a scaling factor of 33) resulted in AXs with similar molecular characteristics as in the laboratory scale. Both solid to liquid ratio and extraction time were essential in improving the yields. Our study demonstrated scalability of the process, opening opportunities for the further development of multifunctional food and material products from the extracted AXs.

1 - 6 of 6
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