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  • 1.
    Baard, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cautious Utopias: Environmental goal-setting with long time frames2015In: Ethics, Policy & Environment, ISSN 2155-0085, E-ISSN 2155-0093, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 187-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is a common goal in the public sector but may be difficult to implement due to epistemic uncertainties and required long time frames. This paper proposes that some of these problems can be solved by formulating cautious utopias, entailing a relationship between means and goals differing from both utopian and realistic goal-setting. Cautiously utopian goals are believed, but not certain, to be achievable and to remain desirable, but are open to future adjustments due to changing desires and/or factual circumstances. Quality criteria for such goals are suggested.

  • 2.
    Baard, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Vredin Johansson, Maria
    Carlsen, Henrik
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Scenarios and sustainability: tools for alleviating the gap between municipal means and responsibilities in adaptation planning2012In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 17, no 6-7, p. 641-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation to climate change often involves long-time frames and uncertainties over the consequences of chosen adaptation measures. In this study, two tools designed for assisting local decision-makers in adaptation planning were tested: socio-economic scenarios and sustainability analysis. The objective was to study whether these tools could be of practical relevance to Swedish municipalities and facilitate local-level climate change adaptation. We found that the municipal planners who participated in the testing generally considered the tools useful and of high relevance, but that more time was needed to use the tools than was provided during the test process.

  • 3.
    Björnberg, Karin Edvardsson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Historic Injustices and the Moral Case for Cultural Repatriation2015In: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, ISSN 1386-2820, E-ISSN 1572-8447, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 461-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly argued that cultural objects ought to be returned to their place of origin in order to remedy injustices committed in the past. In this paper, it is shown that significant challenges attach to this way of arguing. Although there is considerable intuitive appeal in the idea that if somebody wrongs another person then she ought to compensate for that injustice, the principle is difficult (albeit not impossible) to apply to wrongdoings committed many decades or centuries ago. It is not clear that historic injustices can meaningfully be corrected, or compensated for, and there are several arguments why, even in cases where there is a prima facie moral case for compensation, repatriation might not be a legitimate means of remedy. In order to bring analytical clarity to the issue, this paper discusses the various steps of the argument that must be addressed in order to ground a valid repatriation claim based on historic injustices.

  • 4. Carlsen, H.
    et al.
    Dreborg, K.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rocklöv, J.
    Vredin Johansson, M.
    Hälsokonsekvenser av extrem värme i Umeå: Tillämpningsstudie för utvärdering av scenarioverktyg och beräkningsalgoritm för vårdbehov inom forskningsprogrammet Climatools2009Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Edvardsson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Jonas, Elisabeth
    Marstorp, Hakan
    Tidaker, Pernilla
    The Role of Biotechnology in Sustainable Agriculture: Views and Perceptions among Key Actors in the Swedish Food Supply Chain2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 7512-7529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have put forward agricultural biotechnology as one possible tool for increasing food production and making agriculture more sustainable. In this paper, it is investigated how key actors in the Swedish food supply chain perceive the concept of agricultural sustainability and the role of biotechnology in creating more sustainable agricultural production systems. Based on policy documents and semi-structured interviews with representatives of five organizations active in producing, processing and retailing food in Sweden, an attempt is made to answer the following three questions: How do key actors in the Swedish food supply chain define and operationalize the concept of agricultural sustainability? Who/what influences these organizations' sustainability policies and their respective positions on agricultural biotechnology? What are the organizations' views and perceptions of biotechnology and its possible role in creating agricultural sustainability? Based on collected data, it is concluded that, although there is a shared view of the core constituents of agricultural sustainability among the organizations, there is less explicit consensus on how the concept should be put into practice or what role biotechnology can play in furthering agricultural sustainability.

  • 6.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bör vi sätta utopiska mål?2005In: Filosofins nya möten / [ed] Edvardsson, K., Hansson, S. O. and J. Nihlén Fahlqvist, Hedemora: Gidlunds förlag , 2005, p. 211-219Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Environmental policy for sustainable cities: The Swedish environmental quality objective ‘A good built environment’2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry2012In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 261-267Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fyller miljömålen sitt syfte?2006In: Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete / [ed] Edvardsson, K. and S. O. Hansson, Umeå: Borea Bokförlag , 2006Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Klimatförändringar och kön: sitter vi alla i samma båt?2013In: Miljötidningen, ISSN 0282-2113, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational climate mitigation goals2013In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 56, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall goal of the UNFCCC is to prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In policy practice, this goal is mainly operationalized through three types of mitigation targets: emission, atmospheric concentration and temperature targets. The typical function of climate mitigation goals is to regulate action towards goal achievement. This is done in several ways. Mitigation goals help the structuring of the greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement action, over time and between agents; they constitute a standard against which GHG abatement can be assessed and evaluated; they motivate climate conscious behavior; and discourage defection from cooperative abatement regimes. Although the three targets clearly relate to one another, there could be differences in how well they fulfill these functions. In this article, the effectiveness of emission, concentration and temperature targets in guiding and motivating action towards the UNFCCC's overall aim is analyzed using a framework for rational goal evaluation developed by Edvardsson and Hansson (2005) as an analytical tool. It is argued that to regulate action effectively, mitigation goals should ideally satisfy four criteria: precision, evaluability, attainability and motivity. Only then can the target fulfill its typical function, i.e., to guide' and motivate action in a way that facilitates goal achievement.

  • 12.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational environmental goals and sustainable planning2005In: The Sustainable City IV: Urban Regeneration and Sustainability / [ed] Mander, U., Brebbia, C. A. and E. Tiezzi, Southampton, Boston: WIT Press, 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rational goals and sustainable development: An example from the Swedish system of environmental objectives2006In: Science for sustainable development: starting points and critical reflections / [ed] Björn Frostell, Uppsala: VHU , 2006, , p. 97-104p. 97-104Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Rational Goals for the Urban Environment: A Swedish Example2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1007-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the government's aim to create sustainable urban environments is expressed through the environmental quality objective A good built environment. The objective embraces seven sub-goals and is designed to guide central, regional and local authorities' planning towards urban sustainability. However, for objectives concerning the urban environment, such as the Swedish objective A good built environment, to form a solid basis for decision-making, two types of rationality (functionality) conditions ought to be met. First, the objectives should guide and motivate those who are responsible for their implementation. This is applicable when the goals satisfy the criteria of precision, evaluability, approachability and motivity. Second, when the goals are parts of larger goal systems, the goal systems should be coherent. Using the objective A good built environment as an empirical basis, this article gives a few examples of how environmental goals can fail to guide and motivate action towards improved urban sustainability.

  • 15. Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Rational goals in engineering design: The Venice dams2013In: Norms in Technology / [ed] MJ de Vries, SO Hansson, AWM Meijers, Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, p. 83-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Rational Goal-Setting in Environmental Policy: Foundations and Applications2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

     The overall aim of this thesis is to present a model for rational goal-setting and to illustrate how it can be applied in evaluations of public policies, in particular policies concerning sustainable development and environmental quality. The contents of the thesis are divided into two sections: a theoretical section (Papers I-IV) and an empirical section (Papers V-VII). Paper I identifies a set of rationality criteria for single goals and discusses them in relation to the typical function of goals. It is argued that goals are typically set to enhance goal achievement. A goal that successfully furthers its achievement is “achievement-inducing”. It holds for each of the identified criteria that, ceteris paribus, improved satisfaction of a criterion makes a goal better in the achievement-inducing sense.Paper II contains an analysis of the notion of goal system coherence. It is argued that the coherence of a goal system is determined by the relations that hold among the goals in the system, in particular the relations of operationalization, means and ends, support, and conflict. Paper III investigates the rationality of utopian goals. The paper analyzes four arguments that support the normative criterion of attainability: that utopian goals are (1) too imprecise and (2) too far-reaching to guide action effectively, (3) counterproductive, and (4) morally objectionable. A tentative defence of utopian goal-setting is built on counter-arguments that can be put forward to weaken each of the four objections. Paper IV investigates the nature of self-defeating goals. The paper identifies three types of situations in which self-defeating mechanisms obstruct goal achievement: (1) situations in which the goal itself carries the seeds of its own non-fulfilment (self-defeating goals), (2) situations in which the activity of goal-setting contributes to goal failure (self-defeating goal-setting), and (3) situations in which disclosure of the goal interferes with progress (self-defeating goal disclosure). Paper V provides a brief description of the Swedish system of environmental objectives and a preliminary inventory of the management difficulties that attach to this goal system.Paper VI contains an investigation into the rationality of five Swedish environmental objectives through an application of the rationality criteria identified in Papers I-II. The paper identifies and discusses some difficulties that are associated with management by objectives and the use of goals in environmental policy. Paper VII analyses the rationality of the Swedish environmental quality objective A good built environment. Among the conclusions drawn in the paper are that some of the sub-goals to the objective are formulated in terms that are unnecessarily vague from an action-guiding standpoint and that others are problematic from the viewpoint of evaluability.

  • 17.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Using Goals in Environmental Management: The Swedish System of Environmental Objectives2004In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 170-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, environmental policy is essentially carried out through a system of environmental objectives adopted by Parliament in the late 1990s. This system contains principles, objectives, interim targets, strategies, and follow-up mechanisms, which together provide a solid ground for increased efficiency and improved prioritization in environmental policies. Despite the ambitious approach of the Swedish Parliament, the system of environmental objectives suffers from certain shortcomings. Some of the objectives are imprecise and difficult to evaluate, and there are no rules or principles that may be used to solve goal conflicts and to prioritize between different objectives. As a consequence, the environmental objectives tend to differ in their degrees of operationalizability, and the priority-setting between different objectives is often unclear.

  • 18.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Utopian Goals: Four Objections and a Cautious Defence2008In: Philosophy in the Contemporary World, ISSN 1077-1999, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 139-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    What Relations Can Hold among Goals, and Why Does It Matter?2009In: Critica-Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofia, ISSN 0011-1503, Vol. 41, no 121, p. 47-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals are often set as part of Clusters of goals. On the assumption that goals are set because we want to achieve them it is interesting to study not only the conditions tinder which individual goals are rational (functional) but also the factors that combine to determine the rationality of a goal system. This paper argues that to be rational goal systems ought to be coherent, at least to some degree. The paper provides an analysis of goal system coherence and discusses to what. extent goal conflicts are problematic from an action-guiding viewpoint.

  • 20.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cantwell, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Self-Defeating GoalsArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    KTH.
    KTH-toppar attackerar miljömålarbetet – ”Långsamt och otillräckligt”2011In: Miljöaktuellts nätupplagaArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Five areas of value judgement in local adaptation to climate change2012In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 671-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has generated several new theoretical and policy challenges, many of which concern how local communities ought to adapt to a warmer climate. This paper identifies and analyses a number of value judgements that come to the fore as local authorities adapt to climate change. Five categories of judgements are discussed: evaluation (how should the consequences of adaptation be evaluated?), timing (when should adaptive action be taken?), distribution (how should the benefits and burdens of adaptation be distributed?), procedures (who should be involved in adaptation decision making?), and goal conflicts (how should goal conflicts in adaptation be dealt with?). For each category, further research is needed to assist decision making at the local level.

  • 23.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Förord2006In: Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete / [ed] Karin Edvardsson & Sven Ove Hansson, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gendering local climate adaptation2013In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 217-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence suggests that climate change will hit women disproportionately hard. Lack of political power, small economic resources, gender-bound patterns in the division of labour, entrenched cultural patterns and possibly biological differences in heat sensitivity combine to make women and girls particularly vulnerable to extreme weather and other climate-related events. Adaptation responses will likely reduce some of these vulnerabilities. However, just as climate change is likely to impact more severely on women than men, the costs and benefits of adaptation could be unevenly distributed between the sexes. Unless adaptation measures are carefully designed from a gender perspective, they may contribute to preserving prevailing gender inequalities and reinforce women's vulnerability to climate change. Institutions and decision-making processes need to be remodelled so as to guarantee that gender issues are adequately targeted within adaptation. This article identifies a number of methodologies and decision tools that could be used to mainstream gender in local adaptation planning.

  • 25.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven OveKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    When Is a Goal Rational?2005In: Social Choice and Welfare, ISSN 0176-1714, E-ISSN 1432-217X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 343-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In decision theory goals are usually taken as given inputs to the analysis, and the focus is on finding the most efficient means to achieve the goals. But where goals are set with the purpose of achieving them, it is important to know what properties they should possess in order to be successful (or achievement-inducing). Four such properties (or rationality criteria) are discussed, namely that goals should be precise, evaluable, approachable and motivating. Precision and evaluability are epistemic properties that concern what the agent may know. Approachability is an ability-related property that concerns what the agent can do. Motivity is a volitional property that concerns what the agent wants to do. Goals may satisfy the rationality criteria to a greater or lesser extent. Some goals are achievement-inducing mainly because they guide action towards the end-state well, others mainly because they motivate the agent to act towards the realization of the end-state.

  • 27.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven OveKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.Nihlén Fahlquist, JessicaKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Filosofins nya möten2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gilek, Michael
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Climate and environmental science denial: A review of the scientific literature published in 1990-20152017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 167, p. 229-241Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Denial of scientific findings is neither a new nor an unexplored phenomenon. In the area of environmental science and policy though, the research on denial has not been systematically summarized and analyzed. This article reviews 161 scientific articles on environmental and climate science denial published in peer reviewed international journals in the last 25 years and aims to both identify research gaps and enable learning on the phenomenon. Such knowledge is needed for the increasingly important task to provide effective response to science denial, in order to put an end to its influence on environmental policy making. The review, which is based on articles found in the databases Web of Science, Scopus and Philosopher's Index, shows that denial by far is most studied in relation to climate change, with a focus on Anglo-American countries, where this form of denial is most common. Other environmental issues and other geographical areas have received much less scientific attention. While the actors behind climate science denial, their various motives and the characteristics of their operations have been thoroughly described, more comparative research between issues and countries is needed in order to draw reliable conclusions about the factors explaining the peculiarities of denial. This may in turn lay the ground for developing and actually testing the effectiveness and efficiency of strategies to counter environmental science denial. Irrespective of the ambitions of environmental goals, science-based policies are always preferable. The scientific community therefore needs to increase its efforts to dismantle false claims and to disclose the schemes of denialists.

  • 29.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Integrating social sustainability in engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology2015In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 639-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate what are perceived to be the main challenges associated with the integration of social sustainability into engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. Design/methodology/approach - Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme leaders and teachers from four engineering programmes. The paper focuses on how the concept of social sustainability is defined and operationalised in the selected engineering programmes, how social sustainability is integrated and taught, and what resources are required to support teachers and programme leaders as social sustainability educators. Findings - The findings show that programme leaders and teachers at KTH struggle to understand the concept of social sustainability. The vague and value-laden nature of the concept is considered a challenge when operationalising educational policy goals on social sustainability into effective learning outcomes and activities. A consequence is that the responsibility for lesson content ultimately falls on the individual teacher. Study visits and role-play are seen as the most effective tools when integrating social sustainability into the engineering curriculum. Allocation of specific resources including supplementary sustainability training for teachers and economic incentives are considered crucial to successful integration of social sustainability. The findings indicate that social sustainability education needs to be built on a theoretical foundation. It is therefore suggested that a literature canon be established that clarifies the contours of social sustainability. Practical implications - The findings of the paper can be used as a basis for discussion regarding measures for improving social sustainability training in engineering education, a subject which has attracted relatively little attention, to date. Originality/value - There is a noticeable lack of empirical research on how technical universities integrate social sustainability into engineering education. The paper provides an account of how actors directly involved in this work - programme leaders and teachers - define and operationalise the social dimension of sustainable development in their engineering curricula, the pedagogical tools they consider effective when teaching social sustainability issues to engineering students, and the resources they believe are needed to strengthen those efforts.

  • 30.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Integrating social sustainability into the engineering curriculum at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH): A pilot study2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm to integrate sustainable development in the university’s Bachelor and Master education. However, a self-evaluation study carried out in 2012 showed that many programme coordinators and teachers at KTH still struggle with how to integrate social sustainability in their programmes. Based on interviews with programme coordinators at four engineering programmes at KTH we analyse what are perceived to be the main challenges associated with integration of social sustainability in the university’s engineering education. The paper reports on data acquired through the interviews, focusing on three questions: (1) How is the concept of social sustainability defined and operationalized in the selected engineering programmes? (2) How is social sustainability taught in the selected engineering programmes (learning objectives, teaching methods, pedagogical strategies/tools)? (3) What resources (training efforts, material/tools, etc.) are (according to the informants) required in order to support teachers and programming coordinators in their professional roles as (social) sustainability educators?

  • 31.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Goal Conflicts in Adaptation to Climate Change. An inventory of goal conflicts tn the Swedish sectors of the built environment, tourism and outdoor recreation, and human health2009Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Edvardsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    How to Set Rational Environmental Goals: theory and applications2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental goals are commonly set to guide work towards ecological sustainability. The aim of this thesis is to develop a precise terminology for the description of goals in terms of properties that are important in their practical use as decision-guides and to illustrate how it can be used in evaluations of environmental policy.

    Essay I (written together with Sven Ove Hansson) identifies a set of rationality criteria for individual goals and discusses them in relation to the typical function of goals. For a goal to perform its typical function, i.e., to guide and induce action, it must be precise, evaluable, approachable (attainable), and motivating.

    Essay II argues that for a goal system to be rational it must not only satisfy the criteria identified in Essay I but should also be coherent. The coherence of a goal system is made up of the relations that hold among the goals, most notably relations of support and conflict, but possibly also relations of operationalization. A major part of the essay consists in a conceptual analysis of the three relations.

    Essay III contains an investigation into the rationality of five Swedish environmental objectives through an application of the rationality criteria identified in Essays I-II. The paper draws the conclusion that the objectives are not sufficiently rational according to the suggested criteria. It also briefly points at some of the difficulties that are associated with the use of goals in environmental policy and managemen

  • 33.
    Edvardsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Rational environmental goals and sustainable planning: Urban Regeneration and Sustainability2006In: Sustainable City IV: Urban Regeneration and Sustainability / [ed] Mander, U; Brebbia, CA; Tiezzi, E, 2006, p. 477-486Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden planning towards ecological sustainability starts out from a system of environmental objectives adopted by Parliament in the late 1990s. The objectives express what environmental quality society should aim for within a generation, and are designed to guide decision-making in all sectors of society. In order to form a solid basis for planning towards ecological sustainability, the objectives must meet two types of conditions. First, they must have the capacity to guide and motivate those who are responsible for their implementation. To do so each objective must satisfy a set of rationality (fimctionality) criteria for individual goals: precision, evaluability, approachability, and motivity. Second, taken together the objectives must constitute a rational (functional) operationalization of the ecological dimension of sustainable development. For this to be the case the goal system must be coherent. An application of the suggested conditions to three Swedish environmental quality objectives illustrates some of the difficulties that are associated with the Swedish system of environmental objectives and ultimately with the whole idea of using goals in environmental management.

  • 34.
    Edvardsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Setting Rational Environmental Goals: Five Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives2007In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 297-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals and performance targets are commonly used as tools in the policy-implementation process. In Sweden, environmental policy is operationalized through a system of environmental quality objectives that were adopted by the Swedish Riksdag in the late 1990s. The objectives describe what level of environmental quality Sweden should aim for within a generation, and are designed to guide decision making in all sectors of society. However, to guide decision making toward improved environmental quality, these objectives should satisfy a set of rationality (functionality) criteria; they should be precise, evaluable, approachable, motivating and coherent. In this paper, five Swedish environmental quality objectives are investigated through an application of the suggested criteria: (1) a balanced marine environment, flourishing coastal areas and archipelagos; (2) a magnificent mountain landscape; (3) a non-toxic environment; (4) natural acidification only; and (5) a good built environment. The aim of the paper is to bring the rationality of the objectives up for discussion, and to illustrate the range of issues and difficulties that are involved in choosing and assessing environmental policy goals.

  • 35.
    Ekener, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Niccolas, Albiz
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    von Martens, Dominic
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Teaching Social Sustainability in an Engineering Context2016In: The proceedings of EESD2016, Brugge: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 204-211Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kramers, Anna
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Sustainable development for ICT engineering students: “What’s in it for me”?2016In: / [ed] Mazijn, Bernard, Brugge, Belgium: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of sustainable development (SD) is hardly possible to refute; however, sustainable development has been a relatively peripheral subject in computer-related engineering educations. Sustainability, with its global and potentially all-encompassing connotations, is still seen by many Information and Communication Technology (ICT) students as a topic of little relevance to their future careers. So how can teachers convince these students that sustainability is a topic that can be both relevant and interesting for them? From the point of view of the student; “What’s in it for me?”.

    In this paper we describe and compare our efforts to plan and teach three introductory courses on SD in three different ICT-related educational programmes at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The courses were planned separately, but they will be analysed together. We discuss two dimensions that we have found to be imperative in our endeavour to engage our students. The first dimension is to handle the balance between sustainability on a general level versus sustainability as specifically related to ICT. The second dimension is to handle the tension between teaching facts versus an emphasis on students’ reflections and/or practicing skills. We argue that overcoming the challenge of making sustainability relevant to the students is central for successfully teaching these courses. 

  • 37.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Edvardsson Björnber, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    KTH.
    KTH-toppar attackerar miljömålsarbetet: ”Långsamt och otillräckligt”2012In: Miljöaktuellt, ISSN 0345-763X, no 1, p. 7-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38. Fischer, Klara
    et al.
    Ekener-Petersen, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Rydhmer, Lotta
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Social Impacts of GM Crops in Agriculture: A Systematic Literature Review2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 8598-8620Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has recently been argued that the fragmented knowledge on the social impacts of genetically modified (GM) crops is contributing to the polarised debate on the matter. This paper addresses this issue by systematically reviewing 99 peer-reviewed journal articles published since 2004 on the social impacts of GM crops in agriculture; summarising current knowledge, and identifying research gaps. Economic impact studies currently dominate the literature and mainly report that GM crops provide economic benefits for farmers. Other social impacts are less well studied, but present a more complex picture. Studies on access to and benefits of GM crops show that these vary significantly depending on the political and regulatory setting. Substantial evidence indicates that intellectual property rights (IPR) and the private industry's dominance limit the access and utility of available GM crops to many farmers. Wellbeing is frequently discussed in the literature, but rarely investigated empirically. Existing evidence is contradictory and inconclusive. Impact studies from the Global North are virtually non-existent. Moreover, two-thirds of publications are based on previously published empirical evidence, indicating a need for new empirical investigations into the social impacts of GM crops in agriculture.

  • 39.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Using the concept of sustainability to work: Interpretations in academia, policy, and planning2013In: Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe's Greenest City / [ed] Jonathan Metzger, Amy Rader Olsson, Taylor & Francis, 2013, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cantwell, John
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Self-Defeating Goals2016In: Dialectica, ISSN 0012-2017, E-ISSN 1746-8361, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 491-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typical function of goals is to regulate action in a way that furthers goal achievement. Goals are typically set on the assumption that they will help bring the agent(s) closer to the desired state of affairs. However, sometimes endorsement of a goal, or the processes by which the goal is set, can obstruct its achievement. When this happens, the goal is self-defeating. Self-defeating goals are common in both private and social decision-making but have not received much attention by decision theorists. In this paper, we investigate different variants of three major types of self-defeating mechanisms: (1) The goal can be an obstacle to its own fulfilment (self-defeating goal endorsement), (2) goal-setting activities can impede goal achievement (self-defeating goal-setting), and (3) disclosure of the goal can interfere with its attainment (self-defeating goal disclosure). Different strategies against self-defeasance are tentatively explored, and their efficiency against different types of self-defeasance is investigated.

  • 41.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hydén, H
    Johansson, Vicki
    Lööv, A
    Pettersson, C
    Vredin Johansson, Maria
    Policycykeln: En modell för beslutsprocesser i miljöfrågor2006In: Vägar till ett effektivt miljöarbete / [ed] Karin Edvardsson och Sven Ove Hansson, Boréa Bokförlag, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Vredin Johansson, Maria
    Making Climate Policy Efficient: Implementing a Model for Environmental Policy Efficiency2011Report (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Vredin Johansson, Maria
    Making climate policy efficient: Implementing a model for environmental policy efficiency2015In: International Journal of Sustainable Society, ISSN 1756-2538, E-ISSN 1756-2546, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a framework for studies of efficiency in environmental policies in the form of a conceptual policy cycle. The policy cycle’s six major elements are goal-setting, choice of policy instruments, enforcement, changes in behaviour of public and private agents, effects of policy measures and, finally, evaluation. Through iterating the policy cycle (or parts of it), efficiency in environmental policies can be improved. We apply the policy cycle to climate policies, both mitigation and adaptation, and identify important areas for future research.

  • 44.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Lilieqvist, Kristin
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Johansson, Maria Vredin
    Time horizons and discount rates in Swedish environmental policy: Who decides and on what grounds?2016In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 76, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interviews with Swedish authorities reveal large variations in the time horizons and discount rates used in their policy decisions. The time horizon, i.e. the future time period for which effects are included in the analysis, is seldom longer than 40-50 years, and nuclear waste is the only area in which a time horizon longer than 100 years is used regularly. Discount rates for non-commercial purposes vary between 2 per cent and 4 per cent, with 4 per cent as the most common rate. The differences between policy areas appear to be unsystematic and insufficiently justified. We suggest that there may be a need for coordination and, possibly, harmonization, of the choices of time horizons and discount rates.

  • 45. Lindblom, L
    et al.
    Clausen, J
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Hayenhielm, M
    Fröding, Barbro
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Nihlén Fahlquist, Jessica
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Palm, Elin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Wikman, P
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    How Agencies inspect: A comparative study of inspection policies in eight Swedish government agencies2003Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Potential goal conflicts related to climate change mitigation strategies generated through backcasting scenariosManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for mitigating future climate change, different options and strategies have to be considered. Scenarios are a useful strategy for exploring such options, particularly in collaboration with stakeholders. However, measures generated through scenarios that are opted for achieving one particular target, such as mitigation, can have important implications for the achievability of other goals and policies. When the implementation of a measure makes it more difficult to fulfil some other goal that the decision maker aims to achieve, a conflict arises between these goals. To this date, scenarios presenting/suggesting options for attaining mitigation targets deal mostly with illustrations of future states in which the targets are fulfilled, and/or measures and changes for achieving these targets. Conflicts that scenario generated measures and changes could impose on other policy goals have not been analysed and neither have synergies between goals. The purpose of this paper is to identify potential goal conflicts and synergies as potential consequences of four future scenarios assuming zero CO2 emissions 2060, and discuss strategies for dealing with such conflicts. The scenarios were developed for rural land use in Sweden, and an analysis of potential goal conflicts, with relevance for Swedish climate change mitigation processes was made. We have focused on the Swedish environmental goals. We present the analysis of goal conflicts and synergies that could arise in the context of climate change mitigation, we discuss potential strategies for addressing them, and we point at research needs that have to be addressed if we are to better understand how to produce scenarios that can inform climate change mitigation policies, but with less risk of imposing on other policy goals. 

  • 47.
    Van der Voorn, Tom
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Systems ResearchUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Towards multi-target backcasting approach for robust climate change mitigation strategies: A Swedish case study on an environmental assessment of climate mitigation scenarios.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the face of climate change, a major challenge for policy makers is to develop robust scenario-based strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation options. This paper presents a novel approach for environmental assessment of climate change mitigation scenarios. Scenarios, and particularly backcasting scenarios, are often used as a strategy for exploring options and measures for achieving environmental targets, such as climate change mitigation. Measures and options generated through backcasting scenarios are often opted for achieving one particular target and such scenarios are seldom assessed in relation to other environmental aspects. This limits the achievability of other goals and policies. When the implementation of a measure makes it more difficult to fulfil some other goal that the decision maker aims to achieve, a conflict arises between these goals. This paper presents a qualitative environmental assessment of scenarios that identifies conflicts and synergies in regard to a broad range of environmental targets. The method is illustrated in an assessment of four future scenarios assuming zero greenhouse gas emissions 2060 in relation to a variety of environmental aspects, operationalized in policy goals. The scenarios concern rural land use in Sweden, and the goals were the Swedish environmental goals. In this paper potential goal conflicts and synergies that could arise if the strategies and developments in the scenarios were to be realised are analysed. We discuss the assessment and point at research needs that have to be addressed if we are to understand how to better assess

    1

    environmental goal conflicts, and produce scenario outcomes that can inform specific policies, but with less risk of imposing on fulfilment of other policy goals.

  • 48. Zetterberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Time for a New EU Regulatory Framework for GM Crops?2017In: Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, ISSN 1187-7863, E-ISSN 1573-322X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 325-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the EU legislation on genetically modified (GM) crops has come under severe criticism. Among the arguments are that the present legislation is inconsistent, disproportionate, obsolete from a scientific point of view, and vague in terms of its scope. In this paper, the EU GM legislation (mainly the "Release Directive", 2001/18/EC) is analysed based on five proposed criteria: legal certainty, non-discrimination, proportionality, scientific adaptability, and inclusion of non-safety considerations. It is argued that the European regulatory framework does not at present satisfy the criteria of legal certainty, non-discrimination, and scientific adaptability. Two ways of reforming the present legislation toward greater accommodation of the values expressed through the proposed criteria are briefly introduced and discussed.

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