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  • 1. Benninger, Richard K. P.
    et al.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Young, Stephen
    Taner, Sabrina B.
    Culley, Fiona I.
    Schnyder, Tim
    Neil, Mark A. A.
    Wuestner, Daniel
    French, Paul M. W.
    Davis, Daniel M.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Live Cell Linear Dichroism Imaging Reveals Extensive Membrane Ruffling within the Docking Structure of Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapses2009In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 96, no 2, p. L13-L15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have applied fluorescence imaging of two-photon linear dichroism to measure the subresolution organization of the cell membrane during formation of the activating (cytolytic) natural killer (NK) cell immune synapse (IS). This approach revealed that the NK cell plasma membrane is convoluted into ruffles at the periphery, but not in the center of a mature cytolytic NK cell IS. Time-lapse imaging showed that the membrane ruffles formed at the initial point of contact between NK cells and target cells and then spread radialy across the intercellular contact as the size of the IS increased, becoming absent from the center of the mature synapse. Understanding the role of such extensive membrane ruff ling in the assembly of cytolytic synapses is an intriguing new goal.

  • 2. Berglund, S.
    et al.
    Magalhaes, I.
    Gaballa, A.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Uhlin, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Advances in umbilical cord blood cell therapy: the present and the future2017In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, ISSN 1471-2598, E-ISSN 1744-7682, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 691-699Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Umbilical cord blood (UCB), previously seen as medical waste, is increasingly recognized as a valuable source of cells for therapeutic use. The best-known application is in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), where UCB has become an increasingly important graft source in the 28 years since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) was performed. Recently, UCB has been increasingly investigated as a putative source for adoptive cell therapy. Areas covered: This review covers the advances in umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) to overcome the limitation regarding cellular dose, immunological naivety and additional cell doses such as DLI. It also provides an overview regarding the progress in adoptive cellular therapy using UCB. Expert opinion: UCB has been established as an important source of stem cells for HSCT. Successful strategies to overcome the limitations of UCBT, such as the limited cell numbers and naivety of the cells, are being developed, including novel methods to perform in vitro expansion of progenitor cells, and to improve their homing to the bone marrow. Promising early clinical trials of adoptive therapies with UCB cells, including non-immunological cells, are currently performed for viral infections, malignant diseases and in regenerative medicine.

  • 3.
    Christakou, Athanasia. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Ohlin, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Aggregation and long-term positioning of cells by ultrasound in a multi-well microchip for high-resolution imaging of the natural killer cell immune synapse2011In: 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2011, MicroTAS 2011, 2011, p. 329-331Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate the ability of Natural Killer (NK) cells to form ultrasound-mediated intercellular contacts with target cells in a multi-well microdevice by high-resolution confocal-microscopy imaging of inhibitory immune synapses. Furthermore, we compare the NK-Target cell cluster migration with and without ultrasound actuation. Experiments indicate that clusters of cells are positioned and maintained centered in the wells for 17 hours when they are exposed continuously to ultrasound. Our system can be used for both screening high numbers of events in low resolution and also for high resolution imaging of long term cell-cell interactions.

  • 4.
    Christakou, Athanasia E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ohlin, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Kadri, Nadir
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Live cell imaging in a micro-array of acoustic traps facilitates quantification of natural killer cell heterogeneity2013In: Integrative Biology, ISSN 1757-9694, E-ISSN 1757-9708, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 712-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill virus-infected or cancer cells through the release of cytotoxic granules into a tight intercellular contact. NK cell populations comprise individual cells with varying sensitivity to distinct input signals, leading to disparate responses. To resolve this NK cell heterogeneity, we have designed a novel assay based on ultrasound-assisted cell-cell aggregation in a multiwell chip allowing high-resolution time-lapse imaging of one hundred NK-target cell interactions in parallel. Studying human NK cells' ability to kill MHC class I deficient tumor cells, we show that approximately two thirds of the NK cells display cytotoxicity, with some NK cells being particularly active, killing up to six target cells during the assay. We also report that simultaneous interaction with several susceptible target cells increases the cytotoxic responsiveness of NK cells, which could be coupled to a previously unknown regulatory mechanism with implications for NK-mediated tumor elimination.

  • 5.
    Frisk, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    A silicon-glass microwell platform for high-resolution imaging and high-content screening with single cell resolution2011In: Biomedical microdevices (Print), ISSN 1387-2176, E-ISSN 1572-8781, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 683-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel microwell array platform suited for various cell-imaging assays where single cell resolution is important. The platform consists of an exchangeable silicon-glass microchip for cell biological applications and a custom made holder that fits in conventional microscopes. The microchips presented here contain arrays of miniature wells, where the well sizes and layout have been designed for different applications, including single cell imaging, studies of cell-cell interactions or ultrasonic manipulation of cells. The device has been designed to be easy to use, to allow long-term assays (spanning several days) with read-outs based on high-resolution imaging or high-content screening. This study is focused on screening applications and an automatic cell counting protocol is described and evaluated. Finally, we have tested the device and automatic counting by studying the selective survival and clonal expansion of 721.221 B cells transfected to express HLA Cw6-GFP compared to untransfected 721.221 B cells when grown under antibiotic selection for 3 days. The device and automated analysis protocol make up the foundation for development of several novel cellular imaging assays.

  • 6.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brandt, Ludwig
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forslund, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Karl
    Frisk, Thomas W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Per E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Manneberg, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karre, Klas
    Uhlin, Michael
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Microchip screening Platform for single cell assessment of NK cell cytotoxicity2016In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 7, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we report a screening platform for assessment of the cytotoxic potential of individual natural killer (NK) cells within larger populations. Human primary NK cells were distributed across a silicon-glass microchip containing 32,400 individual microwells loaded with target cells. Through fluorescence screening and automated image analysis, the numbers of NK and live or dead target cells in each well could be assessed at different time points after initial mixing. Cytotoxicity was also studied by time-lapse live-cell imaging in microwells quantifying the killing potential of individual NK cells. Although most resting NK cells (approximate to 75%) were non-cytotoxic against the leukemia cell line K562, some NK cells were able to kill several (>= 3) target cells within the 12-h long experiment. In addition, the screening approach was adapted to increase the chance to find and evaluate serial killing NK cells. Even if the cytotoxic potential varied between donors, it was evident that a small fraction of highly cytotoxic NK cells were responsible for a substantial portion of the killing. We demonstrate multiple assays where our platform can be used to enumerate and characterize cytotoxic cells, such as NK or T cells. This approach could find use in clinical applications, e.g., in the selection of donors for stem cell transplantation or generation of highly specific and cytotoxic cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

  • 7.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Khorsidi, Mohammed Ali
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Manneberg, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Christakou, Athanasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Imaging immune surveillance by individual Natural Killer cells isolated in arrays of nanoliter wells2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forslund, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Manneberg, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Per E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tauriainen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stikvoort, Arwen
    Karolinska Institute.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Institute.
    Kärre, Klas
    Karolinska Institute.
    Uhlin, Michael
    Karolinska Institute.
    Önfelt, Bjorn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Microchip screening platform for assessment of cytotoxic effector cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we report a screening platform for assessment of the cytotoxic potential of individual natural killer (NK) or T cells within larger populations. Human primary NK cells or human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- specific T cells were distributed across a silicon-glass microchip containing 32 400 individual microwells loaded with target cells. Through fluorescence screening and automated image analysis the numbers of effector and live or dead target cells in each well could be assessed at different time-points after initial mixing. Cytotoxicity was also studied by time-lapse live-cell imaging in microwells quantifying the killing potential of individual NK cells. Although most resting NK cells (≈75%) were non-cytotoxic to the leukemia cell line K562, some NK cells were able to kill several (≥3) target cells within the 12 hours long experiment. We demonstrate that this assay can be used to enumerate and characterize cytotoxic cells, something that could find clinical applications, e.g. in the selection of donors for stem cell transplantation or generation of highly specific and cytotoxic cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

  • 9.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Hurtig, Johan
    Department of Chemsitry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Christakou, Athanasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Manneberg, Otto
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
    Lindström, Sara
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Imaging Immune Surveillance of Individual Natural Killer Cells Confined in Microwell Arrays2010In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 11, p. e15453-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New markers are constantly emerging that identify smaller and smaller subpopulations of immune cells. However, there is a growing awareness that even within very small populations, there is a marked functional heterogeneity and that measurements at the population level only gives an average estimate of the behaviour of that pool of cells. New techniques to analyze single immune cells over time are needed to overcome this limitation. For that purpose, we have designed and evaluated microwell array systems made from two materials, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and silicon, for high-resolution imaging of individual natural killer (NK) cell responses. Both materials were suitable for short-term studies (<4 hours) but only silicon wells allowed long-term studies (several days). Time-lapse imaging of NK cell cytotoxicity in these microwell arrays revealed that roughly 30% of the target cells died much more rapidly than the rest upon NK cell encounter. This unexpected heterogeneity may reflect either separate mechanisms of killing or different killing efficiency by individual NK cells. Furthermore, we show that high-resolution imaging of inhibitory synapse formation, defined by clustering of MHC class I at the interface between NK and target cells, is possible in these microwells. We conclude that live cell imaging of NK-target cell interactions in multi-well microstructures are possible. The technique enables novel types of assays and allow data collection at a level of resolution not previously obtained. Furthermore, due to the large number of wells that can be simultaneously imaged, new statistical information is obtained that will lead to a better understanding of the function and regulation of the immune system at the single cell level.

  • 10.
    Khorshidi, Mohammad A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance: Correlation Between Killing Efficiency, Transient Migration Behavior and Morphology2012In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 706A-706AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Kowalewski, Jacob M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Garrod, Kym R.
    Lindström, Sara
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Cahalan, Michael D.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Analysis of transient migration behavior of natural killer cells imaged in situ and in vitro2011In: Integrative Biology, ISSN 1757-9694, E-ISSN 1757-9708, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 770-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a simple method for rapid and automatic characterization of lymphocyte migration from time-lapse fluorescence microscopy data. Time-lapse imaging of natural killer (NK) cells in vitro and in situ, both showed that individual cells transiently alter their migration behavior. Typically, NK cells showed periods of high motility, interrupted by transient periods of slow migration or almost complete arrests. Analysis of in vitro data showed that these periods frequently coincided with contacts with target cells, sometimes leading to target cell lysis. However, NK cells were also commonly observed to stop independently of contact with other cells. In order to objectively characterize the migration of NK cells, we implemented a simple method to discriminate when NK cells stop or have low motilities, have periods of directed migration or undergo random movement. This was achieved using a sliding window approach and evaluating the mean squared displacement (MSD) to assess the migration coefficient and MSD curvature along trajectories from individual NK cells over time. The method presented here can be used to quickly and quantitatively assess the dynamics of individual cells as well as heterogeneity within ensembles. Furthermore, it may also be used as a tool to automatically detect transient stops due to the formation of immune synapses, cell division or cell death. We show that this could be particularly useful for analysis of in situ time-lapse fluorescence imaging data where most cells, as well as the extracellular matrix, are usually unlabelled and thus invisible.

  • 12.
    Manneberg, Otto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Svennebring, Jessica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hertz, Hans M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    A three-dimensional ultrasonic cage for characterization of individual cells2008In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 93, p. 063901-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate enrichment, controlled aggregation, and manipulation of microparticles and cells by an ultrasonic cage integrated in a microfluidic chip compatible with high-resolution optical microscopy. The cage is designed as a dual-frequency resonant filleted square box integrated in the fluid channel. Individual particles may be trapped three dimensionally, and the dimensionality of one-dimensional to three-dimensional aggregates can be controlled. We investigate the dependence of the shape and position of a microparticle aggregate on the actuation voltages and aggregate size, and demonstrate optical monitoring of individually trapped live cells with submicrometer resolution.

  • 13.
    Manneberg, Otto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Svennebring, Jessica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hertz, Hans M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ultrasonic microcages for high-resolution characterization of individual cells2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Manneberg, Otto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Flow-free transport of cells in microchannels by frequency-modulated ultrasound2009In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 9, p. 833-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate flow-free transport of cells and particles by the use of frequency-modulated ultrasonic actuation of a microfluidic chip. Two different modulation schemes are combined: A rapid (1 kHz) linear frequency sweep around similar to 6.9 MHz is used for two-dimensional spatial stabilization of the force field over a 5 mm long inlet channel of constant cross section, and a slow (0.2-0.7 Hz) linear frequency sweep around similar to 2.6 MHz is used for flow-free ultrasonic transport and positioning of cells or particles. The method is used for controlling the motion and position of cells monitored with high-resolution optical microscopy, but can also be used more generally for improving the robustness and performance of ultrasonic manipulation micro-devices.

  • 15.
    Olofsson, Per E
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Forslund, Elin
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Chechet, Ksenia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Mickelin, Oscar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Rivera Ahlin, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Everhorn, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Distinct Migration and Contact Dynamics of Resting and IL-2-Activated Human Natural Killer Cells.2014In: Frontiers in immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 5, p. 80-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural killer (NK) cells serve as one of the first lines of defense against viral infections and transformed cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is not dependent on antigen presentation by target cells, but is dependent on integration of activating and inhibitory signals triggered by receptor-ligand interactions formed at a tight intercellular contact between the NK and target cell, i.e., the immune synapse. We have studied the single-cell migration behavior and target-cell contact dynamics of resting and interleukin (IL)-2-activated human peripheral blood NK cells. Small populations of NK cells and target cells were confined in microwells and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for >8 h. Only the IL-2-activated population of NK cells showed efficient cytotoxicity against the human embryonic kidney 293T target cells. We found that although the average migration speeds were comparable, activated NK cells showed significantly more dynamic migration behavior, with more frequent transitions between periods of low and high motility. Resting NK cells formed fewer and weaker contacts with target cells, which manifested as shorter conjugation times and in many cases a complete lack of post-conjugation attachment to target cells. Activated NK cells were approximately twice as big as the resting cells, displayed a more migratory phenotype, and were more likely to employ "motile scanning" of the target-cell surface during conjugation. Taken together, our experiments quantify, at the single-cell level, how activation by IL-2 leads to altered NK cell cytotoxicity, migration behavior, and contact dynamics.

  • 16.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Kowalewski, Jacob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Garrod, Kym
    Lindström, Sara
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersson Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Cahalan, Michael D.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Single Cell Tracking of Natural Killer CellMigration in vivo and in vitro reveals Transient Migration Arrest PeriodsManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Manneberg, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Christakou, Athanasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Ohlin, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hertz, Hans M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ultrasound-controlled cell aggregation in a multi-well chip2010In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 10, no 20, p. 2727-2732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a microplate platform for parallelized manipulation of particles or cells by frequency-modulated ultrasound. The device, consisting of a silicon-glass microchip and a single ultrasonic transducer, enables aggregation, positioning and high-resolution microscopy of cells distributed in an array of 100 microwells centered on the microchip. We characterize the system in terms of temperature control, aggregation and positioning efficiency, and cell viability. We use time-lapse imaging to show that cells continuously exposed to ultrasound are able to divide and remain viable for at least 12 hours inside the device. Thus, the device can be used to induce and maintain aggregation in a parallelized fashion, facilitating long-term microscopy studies of, e.g., cell-cell interactions.

  • 18.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Manneberg, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Christakou, Athanasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Highly parallelized cell aggregation by ultrasound for studies of immune cell interaction2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Olofsson, Per E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forslund, Elin
    Sternberg-Simon, Michal
    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Pacouret, Simon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Guldevall, Karolin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Enqvist, Monika
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    Mehr, Ramit
    Önfelt, Bjorn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 121, no 8, p. 1326-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  • 20.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Christakou, Athanasia E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ohlin, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Iranmanesh, Ida
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Frisk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Ultrasound-Induced Cell-Cell Interaction Studies in a Multi-Well Microplate2014In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review describes the use of ultrasound for inducing and retaining cell-cell contact in multi-well microplates combined with live-cell fluorescence microscopy. This platform has been used for studying the interaction between natural killer (NK) cells and cancer cells at the level of individual cells. The review includes basic principles of ultrasonic particle manipulation, design criteria when building a multi-well microplate device for this purpose, biocompatibility aspects, and finally, two examples of biological applications: Dynamic imaging of the inhibitory immune synapse, and studies of the heterogeneity in killing dynamics of NK cells interacting with cancer cells.

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