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  • 1.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Implementing Design for Six Sigma in large Swedish product developing organisations – an interview study2014In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 5/6, p. 648-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of the organisational evolvement towards increased structure in product development (PD), supporting concepts like Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) have arisen. DFSS provides structuring guidelines as well as suggestions regarding tool and technique implementations for PD. Companies’ need for support and structure from such a concept does, however, not always correspond to the real content of the concept. This article examines the DFSS implementation strategy in four organisations to determine which parts of the DFSS concept are being used by companies. Results show that several of the most difficult activities in PD lack concrete support in DFSS. On the other hand, many of the clearly described actions of the concept are already well-operating methods in today's product developing organisations.

  • 2.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Successful risk management approaches in product development organizations: A case study experience2014In: 2014 Proceedings of PICMET '14: Infrastructure and Service Integration, IEEE , 2014, p. 2243-2253Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses experiences from case studies conducted at product developing departments in four multinational companies. All organizations are outstanding product developing companies with a long and successful historical background within product development. Therefore it is interesting to understand how these companies deal with risks in their product development processes. The aim of the paper is to find out if the Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) concept supports the need of industrial companies to deal with risks in their product development projects. The results show that DFSS promotes the company needs to some extent. There is a great method support in DFSS regarding how to consider technical risks. On the other hand, all companies included in this study would need more support to highlight the holistic perspective concerning cross functional collaborations, increased communication and avoiding sub-optimizations in development project, a requirement that is not sufficiently supported.

  • 3.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gustafsson, Pia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Höök, David
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    von Würtemberg, Marcks Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Flores, Rocha Waldo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Process Improvement Framework Evaluation2010In: 2010 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering, ICMSE 2010, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2010, p. 319-326Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes and evaluates frameworks used in the IT and business domain. The purpose has been to discuss the characteristics, weaknesses and strengths of the frameworks to illuminate how companies can benefit from using them in synergy. Specific strengths within a specific framework such as maturity models and improvement programs have been identified. Many organizations today also use several different frameworks with partly the same content. Therefore, paper concludes by advocating for cooperation between functions using different frameworks based on the similarities identified within this paper to avoid creation of isolated framework islands. To be able to adopt a holistic approach and improve the entire business at an organization it is necessary to develop common methods for similar actions.

  • 4.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Survey of Quality Measurements in Product Development2012In: International Journal of Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1793-8236, E-ISSN 1793-8244, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 258-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of definitions of clear quality measurements within existing product development literature. Several literature sources that mention measurements in product development base their attitude on the triple constraints division into time, costs and functionality/quality. This article summarizes proposed literature definitions of what to include within quality measurements in product development. The article also proposes a statement of different existing viewpoints of quality measurements within some organization’s development process.

  • 5.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Integrating DFSS and Lean Product Development: Using Project Management Success Factors to Evaluate Product Development Concepts2010In: Proceedings ASQ World conference on quality and Improvement, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In product development, there is a need for quality focused structures that enable connections between the development divvision and other departments within the company. During the last decade, several concepts for product development have arisen. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) and Lean Product Development (LPD) are now the most well known quality focused concepts for product development. Even though DFSS and LPD share the same objectives, they are most often regarded independent from each other and most companies chose to work with only one of the concepts. This paper compares and analyzes DFSS and LPD in order to investigate if and how the concepts could be integrated with each other. A widened scope and an objective evaluation of both concepts are ensured by using a general project management approach. The analysis of DFSS and LPD is based on the fulfillment of the ten project management success factors as provided by the Standish Group in their of the cited Chaos report. Based on the analysis, this study concludes that an integration of DFSS and LPD is both possible and beneficial. Together, they meet the requirements of the success factors to a much larger extent than what would be the case for a single concept. From the perspective of The Standish Group a combination of DFSS and LPD generates an almost perfect and complete concept for product development. This paper presents a proposal of how to integrate DFSS and LPD combining parts from the LPD philosophy with concrete tools and structures from DFSS for maximal success.

  • 6.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Würtemberg, Liv Marcks von
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Survey of Quality Measurements in Product Development2011In: Proceedings 2011 International Conference on Product Development and Renewable Energy Resources, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Würtemberg, Liv Marcks von
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Visual Planning Applied in a Research Environment2011In: Proceedings QMOD Conference on Quality and Service Sciences ICQSS, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Von Würtemberg, L.M
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Who is the DFSS Black Belt?: An investigation of the competence profile of the role in theory and practice2011In: PICMET: Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology, Proceedings , 2011, p. 6017809-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies of today use development concepts like Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) to structure and improve their development processes. An important part of the DFSS concept is the role structure and the role of the Black Belt in particular. That the DFSS Black Belts are given sufficient help to meet the high expectations of the role is therefore of crucial importance for the success of a DFSS initiative. When implementing DFSS in an organization, a training investment related to the role structure is recommended by literature. Little is however said about how this training should be carried out in practice. Interviews on a multinational Swedish organization recognized for its extensive DFSS and Six Sigma program shows that some requirements on DFSS Black Belt competences are not covered by existing literature or by the official descriptions of DFSS Black Belt certification requirements. The purpose of the article is to investigate the gap between what companies whish their DFSS Black Belts to know and what support research and DFSS training companies can offer in this matter. The paper also provides a competence profile for a DFSS Black Belt. The competence profile summarizes recommended knowledge for a DFSS Black Belt derived from literature, DFSS certification companies and practical experience from the case study company.

  • 9.
    Franke, Ulrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    König, Johan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Marcks von Würtemberg, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Availability of enterprise IT systems: an expert-based Bayesian framework2012In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 369-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ensuring the availability of enterprise IT systems is a challenging task. The factors that can bring systems down are numerous, and their impact on various system architectures is difficult to predict. At the same time, maintaining high availability is crucial in many applications, ranging from control systems in the electric power grid, over electronic trading systems on the stock market to specialized command and control systems for military and civilian purposes. This paper describes a Bayesian decision support model, designed to help enterprise IT systems decision makers evaluate the consequences of their decisions by analyzing various scenarios. The model is based on expert elicitation from 50 experts on IT systems availability, obtained through an electronic survey. The Bayesian model uses a leaky Noisy-OR method to weigh together the expert opinions on 16 factors affecting systems availability. Using this model, the effect of changes to a system can be estimated beforehand, providing decision support for improvement of enterprise IT systems availability. The Bayesian model thus obtained is then integrated within a standard, reliability block diagram-style, mathematical model for assessing availability on the architecture level. In this model, the IT systems play the role of building blocks. The overall assessment framework thus addresses measures to ensure high availability both on the level of individual systems and on the level of the entire enterprise architecture. Examples are presented to illustrate how the framework can be used by practitioners aiming to ensure high availability.

  • 10.
    Franke, Ulrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    König, Johan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Marcks von Würtemberg, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Availability of enterprise IT systems: an expert-based Bayesian model2010In: Proc. Fourth International Workshop on Software Quality and Maintainability, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ensuring the availability of enterprise IT systems is a challenging task. The factors that can bring systems down are numerous, and their impact on various system architectures is difficult to predict. At the same time, maintaining high availability is crucial in many applications, ranging from control systems in the electric power grid, over electronic trading systems on the stock market to specialized command and control systems for military and civilian purposes. The present paper desccribes a Bayesian decision support model, designed to help enterprise IT systems decision makers evaluate the consequences of their decisions by analyzing various scenarios. The model is based on expert elicitation from 50 academic experts on IT systems availability, obtained through an electronic survey. The Bayesian model uses a leaky Noisy-OR method to weigh together the expert opinions on 16 factors affecting systems availability. Using this model, the effect of changes to a system can be estimated beforehand, providing decision support for improvement of enterprise IT systems availability.

  • 11.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric power and energy systems.
    On Structuring and Practical Use of the Lean Product Development Concept: Based on Case Studies of Industrial Product Development Organizations2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All companies are dependent on having customers that choose to buy their products. These products are the result of the complex New Product Development process (NPD). This process involves many different functions and people with different backgrounds cooperating with each other. Most end customers will not know or care about how the development process was carried out. They will only see the quality, price and functionality of the final product. In other words, the overall result of the development process.

    This thesis studies quality management in product development from an overall perspective and contributes to prior knowledge in three main areas. Firstly, by investigating which challenges successful product development organizations experience in their everyday work. This was done by case studies performed at the product development organizations of ABB, Volvo Cars, IKEA Components and Scania. As a result of the case studies, 14 themes within all 59 organizational needs were identified.

    Secondly, a literature review of the quality management concept Lean Product Development (LPD) concept was conducted. Based on the literature, a new LPD framework was developed, as the LPD research field has not yet agreed on a definition of the concept. This study proposes the following definition for Lean Product Development: 

    Lean Product Development is a companywide strategy for product development aiming to (i) increase value, (ii) decrease waste, (iii) increase flow, (iv) decrease sub-optimizations, and (v) build knowledge.

    The third contribution was done by making a comparison between the organizational needs of the case study companies and Lean Product Development principles, to find out how LPD can support product developing organizations. LPD was found to give good and/or partial support to 43 out of the 59 organizational needs identified in the case studies. This means that Lean Product Development is an important concept for organizations that wish to improve their product development process.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell_2016_On Structuring and Practical Use of the Lean Product Development Concept
  • 12.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Develop products in half the time: Lead time reduction in Swedish organizations2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports experiences from five Swedish product development organizations,striving to decrease the lead time of the development projects. All companies used different strategies leading to varying results. One of the studied companies managed a50% lead time reduction, another have similar results within reach. The other approaches has not, or not yet, shown satisfying results. The two winning strategies both required a high degree of top management support, however in different ways. Either the courage to make drastic changes or persistence to continue with an initiative over time seems be necessary.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    IMPROVED VISUAL PLANNING IN A RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose- The purpose of the study is to investigate whether scrum can be of use in a visualplanning system in a research environment with no connection to software development.Design/Methodology/Approach- A cyclical action research approach was used, implyingthat the researchers took part in the design and development of the studied visual planningsystem.Findings- The scrum influences brought increased structure and efficiency to the studiedresearch process and increased the quality of the cooperation and communication betweenthe researchers. To function well in the non-software environment, the scrum techniqueshad to be complemented with visual long term planning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell et al_Improved Visual Planning in a Research Environment
  • 14.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Case Study on Product Development Performance Measurement2012In: Proceedings of The 2012 International Conference on Innovation, Management and Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study that evaluates the performance of the product development performance measurement system used in a Swedish company that is a part of a global corporate group. The study is based on internal documentation and eighteen indepth interviews with stakeholders involved in the product development process. The results from the case study include a description of what metrics that are in use, how these are employed, and its effect on the quality of the performance measurement system. Especially, the importance of having a well-defined process proved to have a major impact on the quality of the performance measurement system in this particular case.

  • 15.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A case study on a Swedish company2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance evaluation of product development processes is becoming increasingly important as many companies experience tougher competition and shorter product life cycles. This article, based on a case study on a Swedish company investigates the needs and requirements that the company have on a future performance measurement system for product development. The requirements were found to mostly consider cooperation between functions, co-worker motivation and cost-efficient product solutions. These focus areas are common problems in product development since they are addressed in development concepts like Lean Product Development and Design for Six Sigma. Therefore, more research about how they can be supported by performance measurement system for product development would be of interest.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell et al_Strategic performance measurement in product development
  • 16.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Sörqvist, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Swedish Lean Product Development Implementation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Product Development is based on the same philosophy as Lean, applied in a research and development environment. The concept aims to create flow, quality and resource efficiency in the product development process. This paper investigates the implementation strategies of three Swedish companies that have been working with the concept for several years. The results from this study indicates that concrete methods like visual planning are good starting points for Lean Product Development implementation, but that the real results start to show first when the organizations work with methods and principles in parallel. Also, it may not necessarily be an advantage to have an experience of Lean in production environment before starting implement LPD.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell et al_Swedish Lean Product Development Implementation
  • 17.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Quantifying Success Factors for IT Projects-An Expert-Based Bayesian Model2014In: Information systems management, ISSN 1058-0530, E-ISSN 1934-8703, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large investments are made annually to develop and maintain IT systems. Successful outcome of IT projects is therefore crucial for the economy. Yet, many IT projects fail completely or are delayed or over budget, or they end up with less functionality than planned. This article describes a Bayesian decision-support model. The model is based on expert elicited data from 51 experts. Using this model, the effect management decisions have upon projects can be estimated beforehand, thus providing decision support for the improvement of IT project performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Lagerström, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Marcks von Würtemberg, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Holm, Hannes
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Luczak, Oscar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Identifying Factors Affecting Software Development Cost2010In: Proc. of the Fourth International Workshop on Software Quality and Maintainability (SQM), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software systems of today are often complex, making development costs difficult to estimate. This paper uses data from 50 projects performed at one of the largest banks in Sweden to identify factors that have an impact on software development cost. Correlation analysis of the relationship between factor states and project costs were assessed using ANOVA and regression analysis. Ten out of the original 32 factors turned out to have an impact on software development project cost at the Swedish bank, including the number of function points and involved risk. Some of the factors found to have an impact on cost are already included in estimation models such as COCOMO II and SEER-SEM, for instance function points and software platform. Thus, this paper validates these well-known factors for cost estimation. However, several of the factors found in this study are not included in established models for software development cost estimation. Thus, this paper also provides indications for possible extensions of these models.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Lagerström, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Holm, Hannes
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Luczak, Oscar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Identifying factors affecting software development cost and productivity2012In: Software Quality Journal, ISSN 0963-9314, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 395-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software systems of today are often complex, making development costs difficult to estimate. This paper uses data from 50 projects performed at one of the largest banks in Sweden to identify factors that have an impact on software development cost. Correlation analysis of the relationship between factor states and project costs was assessed using ANOVA and regression analysis. Ten out of the original 31 factors turned out to have an impact on software development project cost at the Swedish bank including the: number of function points, involved risk, number of budget revisions, primary platform, project priority, commissioning body's unit, commissioning body, number of project participants, project duration, and number of consultants. In order to be able to compare projects of different size and complexity, this study also considers the software development productivity defined as the amount of function points per working hour in a project. The study at the bank indicates that the productivity is affected by factors such as performance of estimation and prognosis efforts, project type, number of budget revisions, existence of testing conductor, presentation interface, and number of project participants. A discussion addressing how the productivity factors relate to cost estimation models and their factors is presented. Some of the factors found to have an impact on cost are already included in estimation models such as COCOMO II, TEAMATe, and SEER-SEM, for instance function points and software platform. Thus, this paper validates these well-known factors for cost estimation. However, several of the factors found in this study are not included in established models for software development cost estimation. Thus, this paper also provides indications for possible extensions of these models.

  • 20.
    Marcks von Würtemberg, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Sörqvist, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Effects of Advanced Terminology in Quality Management: A survey investigation from Swedish organizations2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To survive in the competitive market, most organizations of today work with quality improvement of some kind in their business. Many organizations use concepts like Six Sigma and Lean, either applied as the structure for the entire improvement work, or as inspiration where elements of the concepts are used in the business development. Within Lean and Lean Product Development (LPD) literature, Japanese terms are frequently used, something that companies have applied to different extents. In Six Sigma and Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) abbreviations are equally common. Furthermore, in non-English speaking countries the frequent use of English terms sometimes obstructs the understanding of the constructs. Altogether, independent of which quality improvement concept an organization chooses to work with, the possibilities of using advanced terminology in some form are numerous.

    The present study investigates possible consequences of using advanced terminology of any kind in quality management, using experience and examples from large Swedish organizations. The paper thoroughly discusses advantages and disadvantages with usage of specialist language, indicating both increased benchmarking opportunities that come with a common use of terms between companies and the risk that too advanced denominations leads to misunderstandings within an organization. Conclusively, the paper emphasizes the importance of making a distinction between terms that are constructs used in the quality management field as a profession and at the everyday work in an organization and to make intentionally conceived choices of what terms that are used within the organization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Narman, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric power and energy systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric power and energy systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric power and energy systems.
    Using enterprise architecture to analyse how organisational structure impact motivation and learning2016In: Enterprise Information Systems, ISSN 1751-7575, E-ISSN 1751-7583, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 523-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When technology, environment, or strategies change, organisations need to adjust their structures accordingly. These structural changes do not always enhance the organisational performance as intended partly because organisational developers do not understand the consequences of structural changes in performance. This article presents a model-based analysis framework for quantitative analysis of the effect of organisational structure on organisation performance in terms of employee motivation and learning. The model is based on Mintzberg's work on organisational structure. The quantitative analysis is formalised using the Object Constraint Language (OCL) and the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and implemented in an enterprise architecture tool.

  • 22.
    Von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Nordström, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    IT project success factors: An experience report2011In: Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology: Technology Management in the Energy-Smart World, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large investments are made annually for development and maintenance ofITsystems, systems that support the core business of all types of companies and organizations. Successful outcome ofITprojectsis therefore a crucial issue for the economy at large, yet a majority of theITprojectscarried out today fail whenitcomes to finishing on time, within budget and with the desired quality. The contribution of this paper is theexperiencefrom 28ITprojects. The influence ofITprojectsuccessfactors, derived from previous research, were assessed by theprojectmanagers and compared with theprojectsoutcome in terms of time, budget and quality. Though the dataset is too small to allow generalization, thesuccessfactorsRisk analysis, User involvement and Top management support turned out to be of particular importance for the reviewedprojects.

  • 23.
    Von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Abstract model of LPD: A critical review of the Lean Product Development concept2011In: PICMET: Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology: Technology Management in the Energy-Smart World, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies that have been working success- fully withLeanfor some years are now implementingLeanProduct Development,LPD. Even though much has been written about theLPDconcept,amain body of theLPDliterature is promoting the concept without objections. Accordingly, criticism towardsLPDtends to be undividedly negative to the concept. The contribution of the present study is twofold. First, it summarizes previous research about theLPDconcept inamodelin accordance with Enterprise Architecture terminology. This section also includesastructured breakdown of tools mentioned inLPDliterature. Second, the paper discusses both advantages and disadvantages with the concept, aiming to present an unfeigned picture ofLPD, using examples from Swedish industries. Thereby, the study clarifies which expectations thatacompany starting to implementLPDreasonably can have on the concept.

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