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  • 1.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The inclusion of vehicle shape and aerodynamic drag estimations within the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2019In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 84, p. 902-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work describes a widening of the scope of the Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology with the addition of shape-related design variables. They describe the curvature of a vehicle which impacts its aerodynamic drag and therewith its operational energy demand. Aerodynamic drag is taken into account through the estimation of the drag coefficient of the vehicle body shape using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Subsequently, the aforementioned coefficient is used to calculate the operational energy demand associated with the vehicle. The methodology is applied to the design of the roof of a simplified 2D vehicle model which is both mechanically and geometrically constrained. The roof is modelled as a sandwich structure with its design variables consisting of the material compositions of the different layers, their thicknesses as well as the shape variables. The efficacy of the LCEO methodology is displayed through its ability to deal with the arising functional conflicts while simultaneously leveraging the design benefits of the underlying functional alignments. On average, the optimisation process resulted in 2.5 times lighter and 4.5 times less life cycle energy-intensive free shape designs. This redesign process has also underlined the necessity of defining an allocation strategy for the energy necessary to overcome drag within the context of vehicle sub-system redesign.

  • 2.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Towards holistic energy-efficient vehicle product system design: The case for a penalized continuous end-of-life model in the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2019In: 22nd International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED19, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Vol. 1, p. 2901-2910Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology aims at finding a design solution that uses a minimum amount of cumulative energy demand over the different phases of the vehicle's life cycle, while complying with a set of functional constraints. This effectively balances trade-offs, and therewith avoids sub-optimal shifting between the energy demand for the cradle-to-production of materials, operation of the vehicle, and end-of-life phases. The present work describes the extension of the LCEO methodology to perform holistic product system optimisation. The constrained design of an automotive component and the design of a subset of the processes which are applied to it during its life cycle are simultaneously optimised to achieve a minimal product system life cycle energy. A subset of the processes of the end-of-life phase of a vehicle’s roof are modelled through a continuous formulation. The roof is modelled as a sandwich structure with its design variables being the material compositions and the thicknesses of the different layers. The results show the applicability of the LCEO methodology to product system design and the use of penalisation to ensure solution feasibility.

  • 3.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Pignier, Nicolas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Boij, Susann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Dahan, Jeremy A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. Siemens PLM, United Kingdom.
    Identification of noise sources on a realistic landing gear using numerical phased array methods applied to computational data2017In: 23rd AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aerodynamic sound sources on a realistic landing gear are investigated using numerical phased array methods, based on array data extracted from compressible Detached-Eddy Simulations of the flow. Assuming monopole or monopole in a moving medium propagation, the sound sources are identified in the source region through various beamforming approaches: dual linear programming (dual-LP) deconvolution, orthogonal beamforming and CLEAN-SC. The predicted source locations are in good agreement with previous experimental results performed on the same nose landing gear configuration by industrial and academic partners within the ALLEGRA project. Additionally, the modeled sources are used to generate far-field spectra which are subsequently compared to the ones obtained with the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy. The results of the dual-LP approach show a good match between the far-field spectra up to a certain frequency threshold cor- responding to the quality of the mesh used. The results demonstrate the potential of numerical phased array methods as a legitimate modeling tool for aeroacoustic simulations in general and as a tool to gain insight into the noise generation mechanisms of landing gear components in particular. 

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