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  • 1.
    Elmi Moamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Comparing Africa’s Shared River Basins – The Limpopo, Orange, Juba and Shabelle Basins2014In: Universal Journal of Geoscience, ISSN 2331-9615, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 200-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper compares the Limpopo and Orange Rivers in Southern African Development Community (SADC), and the Juba and Shabelle Rivers in the Horn of Africa (HoA), which all are internationally shared basins. The aim is to identify differences and similarities between the river basins in the two regions in order to increase our knowledge and understanding of the issue of shared rivers. Relevant data were mainly collected and methods applied include document and literature review, text analysis, interviews with key professional persons during several study visits to the regions. Both the physical geography and the sectoral water uses of the rivers were presented and analyzed. Climatic similarities stand out when comparing the basins, as they are characterized by unevenly distributed rainfall patterns with great seasonal and annual variations, and the regions are water scarce. In both regions, the population is increasing, while the available water resource is decreasing. In all of the four basins, the regions are facing inevitable crisis of water scarcity. The river basins differ however primarily in terms of physical development of rivers’ water resources. The rivers in SADC have been developed for varieties of uses while the rivers in HoA are under-developed and under-utilized. The SADC rivers have established joint institutions for cross-border river cooperation while the HoA rivers have never had any type of river cooperation. Since the rivers have almost similar climatic and physical conditions, the legitimate research question in the future could be: what caused the differences in resource development and cooperation?

  • 2.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Joint Development and Cooperation in International Water Resources2013In: International Waters in Southern Africa / [ed] Nakayama, Mikayasu, United Nations University Press, 2013, p. 209-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Managing Shared Basins in the Horn of Africa: Ethiopian Projects on the Juba and Shabelle Rivers and Downstream Effects in Somalia2013In: Natural Resources and Conservation, ISSN 2331-6365, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Managing shared river basins in the Horn of Africa: Ethiopian planned water projects on the Juba and Shabelle Rivers and effects on downstream uses in Somalia2013In: Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, ISSN 1746-448X, E-ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 172, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Juba and Shabelle Rivers in the Horn of Africa are shared by Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia. Most of the rivers' runoff originates from the Ethiopian Highlands. Before entering into the Indian Ocean, the rivers pass through a semidesert area and cross area of border dispute. The rivers are in a war-scarce, warravaged and contentious region. The paper examines the physical and developmental aspects of the two rivers, and analyses resulting trans-boundary river management issues. Methodology used is document and literature reviews, interviews with key persons and other relevant organizations. River master plans and other relevant documents describing policies as well as existing and planned uses were reviewed. The two rivers supply support important economic areas in southern Somalia. As an outcome from their master plans of the river basins, Ethiopia is now planning to build several large dams for hydropower generation and large scale irrigation schemes. No notifications were given to downstream Somalia, which will be the most affected downstream riparian of the projects. These unilateral major water development projects will have substantial adverse impacts on Somalia, as there are no agreements between the nations on sharing river waters. The sum of the existing uses in Somalia and planned ones in Ethiopia will exceed available water resources in the rivers. Potential disputes over the shared rivers are therefore likely to rise. Turning this risk of conflict into a sustainable peace and development in the region, the paper presents existing and potential opportunities for cooperation over the shared water resources for mutually sharing benefits.

  • 5.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sharing Water in Africa: Comparative Analysis of the Limpopo and Orange-Senqu River Basins in SADC and the Juba and Shabelle River Basins in the Horn of Africa2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As water resources management becomes increasingly critical and many countries in the arid and semi-arid regions are increasingly forced to consider the possibilities of utilizing the water that is available in international rivers. Thus, the concerns relating to the use of international waters in shared rivers are becoming more important. The increasing competition over shared waters may have to lead either to more joint management and cooperation or to conflicts between basin countries.

    The purpose of the thesis work has been to analyze management of shared waters in international river basins with case studies from the Limpopo and the Orange River Basins in Southern African Development Community (SADC) region and the Juba and Shabelle River Basins in the Horn of Africa (HoA) region, focusing on river cooperation. The methodology employed was a comparative case study analysis through literature review, document analysis, interviews, focus groups and study visits.

    While similarities in climatic conditions and population growth stand out when comparing the basins in the two regions, the rivers differ primarily in terms of physical development of the water resources and institutional building for cross-border river cooperation. The Limpopo and Orange-Senqu river basins in the SADC region became reason for cooperation and catalyst of regional integration while the Juba and Shabelle river basins in the HoA has the potential to lead its riparian to conflict. The river basins in SADC established and operationalized functional system of river cooperation with both bilateral and multilateral basin-wide frameworks.The analysis concludes that management of water resources in internationally shared river basins is effectively affected by issues other than water. Sharing benefits from the shared waters in international rivers require basin-wide river cooperation. There are variety sets of factors that are of great importance for initiating, establishing and operationalizing river basin cooperation.

  • 6.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Transboundary Water Management in the Limpopo and the Orange-Senqu River Basins of SADC: Bilateral Cooperation in Multilateral FrameworkManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Elmi Mohamed, Abdullahi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Iman, Hussien M.
    Hydropolitics in the Horn of Africa: Conflicts and Required Cooperation in the Juba and Shabelle River Basins2010In: Shared Waters, Shared Opportunities: Hydropolitics in East Africa, Nairobi: French Institute for Research in Africa , 2010, p. 37-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Kinsman, John
    Johansson, Karin
    Mohamud, Khalif Bile
    Weinehall, Lars
    Freij, Lennart
    Wall, Stig
    Dalmar, Abdirisak Ahmed
    Ibrahim, Abdirashid Omer
    Hagi, Abdisamad Abikar
    Abdi, Abshir Ali
    Hussein, Abdullahi Sheik
    Shirwa, Abdulkadir Mohamed
    Warsame, Amina
    Ereg, Derie Ismail
    Aden, Mohamed Hussain
    Qasim, Maryan
    Ali, Mohamed Khalid
    Elmi, Abdullahi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Afrah, Abdullahi Warsame
    Sabtiye, Faduma Omar
    Guled, Fatuma Ege
    Ahmed, Hinda Jama
    Mohamed, Halima
    Tinay, Halima Ali
    Mohamud, Kadigia Ali
    Yusuf, Mariam Warsame
    Omar, Mayeh
    Abdi, Yakoub Aden
    Abdulkadir, Yusuf
    Johansson, Annika
    Kulane, Asli Ali
    Schumann, Barbara
    Essen, Birgitta
    Kalengayi, Faustine Nkulu
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Norstrom, Fredrik
    Lonnberg, Goran
    Norder, Helene
    Schroders, Julia
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Edin, Kerstin
    Sahlen, Klas-Goran
    Gustafsson, Lars L.
    Persson, Lars-Ake
    Eriksson, Malin
    Emmelin, Maria
    Hasselberg, Marie
    Klingberg, Marie
    Preet, Raman
    Hogberg, Ulf
    Sjostrom, Urban
    Omar, Saif
    Healing the health system after civil unrest2015In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-4, article id 27381Article in journal (Refereed)
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