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  • 1.
    Fallqvist, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Kroon, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Gad, Annica
    Karolinska Institutet, MTC.
    Experimental and computational assessment of F-actin influence in regulating cellular stiffness and relaxation behaviour of fibroblasts2016In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 59, p. 168-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In biomechanics, a complete understanding of the structures and mechanisms that regulate cellular stiffness at a molecular level remain elusive. In this paper, we have elucidated the role of filamentous actin (F-actin) in regulating elastic and viscous properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Specifically, we performed colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) on BjhTERT fibroblast cells incubated with Latrunculin B (LatB), which results in depolymerisation of F-actin, or DMSO control. We found that the treatment with LatB not only reduced cellular stiffness, but also greatly increased the relaxation rate for the cytoplasm in the peripheral region and in the vicinity of the nucleus. We thus conclude that F-actin is a major determinant in not only providing elastic stiffness to the cell, but also in regulating its viscous behaviour. To further investigate the interdependence of different cytoskeletal networks and cell shape, we provided a computational model in a finite element framework. The computational model is based on a split strain energy function of separate cellular constituents, here assumed to be cytoskeletal components, for which a composite strain energy function was defined. We found a significant influence of cell geometry on the predicted mechanical response. Importantly, the relaxation behaviour of the cell can be characterised by a material model with two time constants that have previously been found to predict mechanical behaviour of actin and intermediate filament networks. By merely tuning two effective stiffness parameters, the model predicts experimental results in cells with a partly depolymerised actin cytoskeleton as well as in untreated control. This indicates that actin and intermediate filament networks are instrumental in providing elastic stiffness in response to applied forces, as well as governing the relaxation behaviour over shorter and longer time-scales, respectively.

  • 2. Frye, M.
    et al.
    Taddei, A.
    Dierkes, C.
    Martinez-Corral, I.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Ortsäter, H.
    Kazenwadel, J.
    Calado, D. P.
    Ostergaard, P.
    Salminen, M.
    He, L.
    Harvey, N. L.
    Kiefer, F.
    Mäkinen, T.
    Matrix stiffness controls lymphatic vessel formation through regulation of a GATA2-dependent transcriptional program2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue and vessel wall stiffening alters endothelial cell properties and contributes to vascular dysfunction. However, whether extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness impacts vascular development is not known. Here we show that matrix stiffness controls lymphatic vascular morphogenesis. Atomic force microscopy measurements in mouse embryos reveal that venous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) progenitors experience a decrease in substrate stiffness upon migration out of the cardinal vein, which induces a GATA2-dependent transcriptional program required to form the first lymphatic vessels. Transcriptome analysis shows that LECs grown on a soft matrix exhibit increased GATA2 expression and a GATA2-dependent upregulation of genes involved in cell migration and lymphangiogenesis, including VEGFR3. Analyses of mouse models demonstrate a cell-autonomous function of GATA2 in regulating LEC responsiveness to VEGF-C and in controlling LEC migration and sprouting in vivo. Our study thus uncovers a mechanism by which ECM stiffness dictates the migratory behavior of LECs during early lymphatic development.

  • 3.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden..
    Tuominen, Mikko
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Haapanen, Janne
    Makela, Jyrki M.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces2016In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 468, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7 degrees C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4 degrees C and -7 degrees C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost formation to occur. 

  • 4.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Haapanen, Janne
    Mäkelä, Jyrki M.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: supercooled water onhydrophobic surfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and for obtaining anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titaniumdioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these sets of surfaces we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7 °C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4 °C and -7 °C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. This hysteresis is lower for hydrophobic wood samples with multi-scale roughness compared to those with predominantly micro-scale features. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data suggests that the multi-scale roughness reduces the penetration of supercooled water into surface depressions, and enhances the freezing delay at low degrees of supercooling. However, the flat surface is even more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost formation to occur.

  • 5.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Local surface mechanical properties of PDMS-silica nanocomposite probed with Intermodulation AFMManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Thorén, Per Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Haviland, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Local surface mechanical properties of PDMS-silica nanocomposite probed with Intermodulation AFM2017In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 150, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of polymeric nanocomposites are strongly affected by the nature of the interphase between filler and matrix, which can be controlled by means of surface chemistry. In this report, we utilize intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) to probe local mechanical response with nanometer-scale resolution of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) coatings with and without 20 wt% of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. The data evaluation is carried out without inferring any contact mechanics model, and is thus model-independent. ImAFM imaging reveals a small but readily measurable inhomogeneous mechanical response of the pure PDMS surface layer. The analysis of energy dissipation measured with ImAFM showed a lowering of the viscous response due to the presence of the hydrophobic silica nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. An enhanced elastic response was also evident from the in-phase stiffness of the matrix, which was found to increase by a factor of 1.5 in presence of the nanoparticles. Analysis of dissipation energy and stiffness in the immediate vicinity of the nanoparticles provides an estimate of the interphase thickness. Because the local stiffness varies significantly near the nanoparticle, AFM height images contain artifacts that must be corrected in order to reveal the true surface topography. Without such a correction the AFM height images erroneously show that the stiff particles protrude from the surface, whereas corrected images show that they are actually embedded in the matrix and likely covered with a thin layer of polymer.

  • 7.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Haviland, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Comparison between AFM-based methods for assesing local surface mechanical properties of PDMS-silica composite layersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Local surface mechanical properties of polymeric nanocomposites play a significant role in theirperformance. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can be used to perform measurements of suchproperties with high lateral resolution. The interphase between filler and matrix, and how it can becontrolled by means of surface chemistry is of particular interest. In this work we compare threeoperating modes of AFM: Tapping mode, PeakForce QNM (Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping)and Intermodulation AFM (ImAFM), for their ability to capture the tip-surface force and to extractlocal mechanical properties by applying different contact mechanics models. Layers ofpoly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with and without 20 wt.% of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles werestudied employing these AFM modes. We show that tapping mode AFM can provide qualitativeinformation, but it is insufficient to accurately and quantitatively discriminate surface propertiessince this mode does not allow extraction of the tip-surface force. Quantitative mapping ofmechanical properties is possible with both PeakForce QNM and ImAFM. However, it remained achallenge to evaluate the data for soft PDMS layers with PeakForce QNM. Local surface mechanicalproperties could be more reproducibly assessed via ImAFM. We show that the Tapping modeimages for pure PDMS report a relatively homogeneous surface, but as we utilize PeakForce QNMand ImAFM more details appear and the inhomogeneous nature of the surface layer becomesapparent. Incorporation of silica particles in the PDMS layer results in a significant increase in theapparent stiffness of the matrix. All imaging modes allow visualization of the hard particles in thesoft matrix. However, we were most successful with imaging the interphase using ImAFM.

  • 8.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Huang, Hui
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ecco, Luiz
    Schellbach, Carsten
    Delmas, Gregory
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Tech Res Inst Sweden.
    Towards the mechanism of electrochemical activity and self-healing of 1 wt% PTSA doped polyaniline in alkyd composite polymer coating: combined AFM-based studies2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 19111-19127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A composite solvent-borne alkyd coating with 1 wt% p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) doped polyaniline (PANI) was prepared. The mechanisms of electrochemical activity and self-healing properties of the composite coating were investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), intermodulation AFM (ImAFM), electrochemical controlled (EC)-AFM combined with cyclic voltammetry (CV), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as open-circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. The ImAFM demonstrates the multiphase structure of the composite coating and a high compatibility between the doped PANI and alkyd matrix. The CV and EC-AFM results reveal a high electrochemical activity of the doped PANI in the composite coating as well as reversible redox reactions between the emeraldine salt (ES) and leuco emeraldine base (LB) forms. The Volta potential mapping of KFM demonstrates a strong self-healing ability of the doped PANI in air conditions. The good electrochemical connection between the fine network of PANI in the composite coating and metal surface underneath enable the occurrence of reversible redox reaction between the ES/LB forms of doped PANI and a concomitant release of dopant anions both in air and in 3 wt% NaCl solution as demonstrated by OCP and EIS results. These therefore lead to the strong passivation and self-healing effect of the composite coated on the carbon steel surface.

  • 9.
    Mizuno, Hiroyasu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    Kjellin, Mikael
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    Fielden, Matthew
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    COLL 385-Friction measurement between polyester fibres using fibre probe SPM2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10. Mukherjee, S. P.
    et al.
    Gliga, A. R.
    Lazzaretto, B.
    Brandner, B.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Newman, L.
    Rodrigues, A. F.
    Shao, W.
    Fournier, P. M.
    Toprak, Muhammet Sadaka
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Star, A.
    Kostarelos, K.
    Bhattacharya, K.
    Fadeel, B.
    Graphene oxide is degraded by neutrophils and the degradation products are non-genotoxic2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1180-1188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophils were previously shown to digest oxidized carbon nanotubes through a myeloperoxidase (MPO)-dependent mechanism, and graphene oxide (GO) was found to undergo degradation when incubated with purified MPO, but there are no studies to date showing degradation of GO by neutrophils. Here we produced endotoxin-free GO by a modified Hummers' method and asked whether primary human neutrophils stimulated to produce neutrophil extracellular traps or activated to undergo degranulation are capable of digesting GO. Biodegradation was assessed using a range of techniques including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and mass spectrometry. GO sheets of differing lateral dimensions were effectively degraded by neutrophils. As the degradation products could have toxicological implications, we also evaluated the impact of degraded GO on the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. MPO-degraded GO was found to be non-cytotoxic and did not elicit any DNA damage. Taken together, these studies have shown that neutrophils can digest GO and that the biodegraded GO is non-toxic for human lung cells.

  • 11.
    Raj, Akanksha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wang, Min
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Zander, Thomas
    Wieland, D. C. Florian
    Liu, Xiaoyan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    An, Junxue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Garamus, Vasil M.
    Willumeit-Roemer, Regine
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Lubrication synergy: Mixture of hyaluronan and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 488, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phospholipids and hyaluronan have been implied to fulfil important roles in synovial joint lubrication. Since both components are present in synovial fluid, self-assembly structures formed by them should also be present. We demonstrate by small angle X-ray scattering that hyaluronan associates with the outer shell of dipalmitoylphophatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles in bulk solution. Further, we follow adsorption to silica from mixed hyaluronan/DPPC vesicle solution by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation measurements. Atomic Force Microscope imaging visualises the adsorbed layer structure consisting of non-homogeneous phospholipid bilayer with hyaluronan/DPPC aggregates on top. The presence of these aggregates generates a long-range repulsive surface force as two such surfaces are brought together. However, the aggregates are easily deformed, partly rearranged into multilayer structures and partly removed from between the surfaces under high loads. These layers offer very low friction coefficient (<0.01), high load bearing capacity (approximate to 23 MPa), and self-healing ability. Surface bound DPPC/hyaluronan aggregates provide a means for accumulation of lubricating DPPC molecules on sliding surfaces.

  • 12.
    Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Heydarihamedani, Golrokh
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Haapanen, Janne
    TUT Tampere University of Technology, Aerosol Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics.
    Mäkelä, Jyrki M.
    TUT Tampere University of Technology, Aerosol Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics.
    Wålinder, E.P. Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Claessson, M. Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Hydrophobisation of wood surfaces by combining liquid flame spray (LFS)and plasma treatment: dynamic wetting properties2016In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 527-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrophilic nature of wood surfaces is a major cause for water uptake and subsequent biological degradation and dimensional changes. In the present paper, a thin transparent superhydrophobic layer on pine veneer surfaces has been created for controlling surface wettability and water repellency. This effect was achieved by means of the liquid flame spray (LFS) technique, in the course of which nanoparticulate titanium dioxide (TiO2) was brought to the surface, followed by plasma polymerisation. Plasma polymerised perfluorohexane (PFH) or hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) were then deposited onto the LFS-treated wood surfaces. The same treatment systems were applied to silicon wafers so as to have well-defined reference surfaces. The dynamic wettability was studied by the multicycle Wilhelmy plate method, resulting in advancing and receding contact angles as well as sorption behaviour of the samples during repeated wetting cycles in water. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterise the topography and surface chemical compositions and to elucidate the question how the morphology of the nanoparticles and plasma affect the wetting behaviour. A multi-scale roughness (micro-nano roughness) was found and this enhanced the forced wetting durability via a superhydrophobic effect on the surface, which was stable even after repeated wetting cycles. The hydrophobic effect of this approach was higher compared to that of plasma modified surfaces with their micro-scale modification.

  • 13.
    Wang, Min
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Adsorption and Friction Performance of Layers formed from Mixed Hyaluronan -Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Vesicle SolutionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
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