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  • 1.
    Brown, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    Radiometric and spectrophotometric in vitro assays of glycosyltransferases involved in plant cell wall carbohydrate biosynthesis2012In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1634-1650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the glycosyltransferases (GTs) that catalyze the formation of plant cell wall carbohydrates remain to be biochemically characterized. This can be achieved only if specific assays are available for these enzymes. Here we present a protocol for in vitro assays of processive and nonprocessive membrane-bound GTs. The assays are either based on the use of radioactive nucleotide sugars (NDP sugars; e.g., UDP-[U-C-14] glucose) and the quantification of the radiolabeled monosaccharides incorporated into soluble or insoluble carbohydrates, or on the coupling of the GT reaction with that of pyruvate kinase (PK) and the oxidation of NADH by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The radiometric assays are more suitable for exploratory work on poorly characterized enzymes, whereas the spectrophotometric assays require the availability of highly enriched GTs. Both assays can be performed within 1 d, depending on the number of fractions to be assayed or reaction mixtures to be tested.

  • 2.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhancing toughness of cellulose nanofibrils through the expression of cellulose-binding modules in plantManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Stronger cellulose microfibril network structure through the expression of cellulose-binding modules in plant primary cell walls2019In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 3083-3094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) are non-catalytic domains typically occurring in glycoside hydrolases. Their specific interaction with diverse polysaccharides assists hydrolysis by the catalytic subunits. In this work, we have exploited the interactions between a CBM from family 3 (CBM3) and cell wall polysaccharides to alter the structure and mechanical properties of cellulose microfibrils from BY-2 tobacco cell suspension cultures. A CBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was overexpressed in the cells using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Water suspensions of cellulose microfibrils were prepared by the removal of the non-cellulosic components of the primary cell walls, followed by mild disintegration using sonication. The morphology of the microfibrils was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These cellulose microfibrils were further hydrolyzed with 64wt% sulfuric acid to produce cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The average length of CNCs prepared from the CBM3-transformed cells was 201nm, higher than that from the wild-type cells (122nm). In addition, the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism of nanopapers prepared from suspensions of cellulose microfibrils were investigated. The nanopapers obtained from the CBM3-transformed cells exhibited enhanced tensile strength and work of fracture, 40% and 128% higher than those prepared from wild-type tobacco cells, respectively. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 4.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Understanding and manipulating primary cell walls in plant cell suspension cultures2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cell wall is required for many aspects of plant function and development. It is also an accessible and renewable resource utilized both in unrefined forms and as raw material for further development. Increased knowledge regarding cell wall structure and components will contribute to better utilization of plants and the resources they provide. In this thesis aspects of the primary cell wall of Populus trichocarpa and Nicotiana tabacum are explored.

    In Publication I a method for isolation and biochemical characterization of plant glycosyltransferases using a spectrophotometric or a radiometric assay was optimized. The radiometric assay was applied in Publication II where the proteome of the plasmodesmata isolated from P. trichocarpa was analyzed. Proteins identified belonged to functional classes such as “transport”, “signalling” and “stress responses”. Plasmodesmata-enriched fractions had high levels of callose synthase activity under ion depleted conditions as well as with calcium present.

    The second part of the thesis comprises the alteration of the cell wall of N. tabacum cells and A. thaliana plants through in vivo expression of a carbohydrate binding module (CBM) (Publication III). In tobacco this resulted in cell walls with loose ultrastructure containing an increased proportion of 1,4-β-glucans. The cell walls were more susceptible to saccharification, possibly due to changes in the structure of cellulose or xyloglucan. Arabidopsis plants showed increased saccharification after mild pretreatment, suggesting that heterologous expression of CBMs is a promising method for cell wall engineering. In Publication IV cellulose microfibrils (CMFs) and nanocrystals (CNCs) were extracted from the transgenic cells. CNC preparation resulted in higher yields and longer CNCs. Nanopapers prepared from the CMFs of the CBM line demonstrated enhanced strength and toughness. Thus, changes to the ordered regions of cellulose were suggested to take place due to CBM expression.

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