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  • 1.
    Kull, Kalevi
    et al.
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Bogdanova, Olga
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Gramigna, Remo
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Heinapuu, Ott
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Lepik, Eva
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Riin, Magnus
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Moss, Rauno Thomas
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Ojamaa, Maarja
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Pern, Tanel
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Põhjala, Priit
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Pärn, Katre
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Raudmäe, Kristi
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Remm, Tiit
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Salupere, Silvi
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Soovik, Ene-Reet
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Sõukand, Renata
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Tønnessen, Morten
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    Väli, Katre
    Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu.
    A hundred introductions to semiotics, for a million students: Survey of semiotics textbooks and primers in the world2015In: Sign Systems Studies, ISSN 1406-4243, Vol. 43, no 2-3, p. 281-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to estimate the current situation of teaching materials available in the field of semiotics, we are providing a comparative overview and a worldwide bibliography of introductions and textbooks on general semiotics published within last 50 years, i.e. since the beginning of institutionalization of semiotics. In this category, we have found over 130 original books in 22 languages. Together with the translations of more than 20 of these titles, our bibliography includes publications in 32 languages. Comparing the authors, their theoretical backgrounds and the general frames of the discipline of semiotics in diff erent decades since the 1960s makes it possible to describe a number of predominant tendencies. In the extensive bibliography thus compiled we also include separate lists for existing lexicons and readers of semiotics as additional material not covered in the main discussion. Th e publication frequency of new titles is growing, with a certain depression having occurred in the 1980s. A leading role of French, Russian and Italian works is demonstrated.

  • 2.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anthropos and its Scene: Anthropocene, heritage and long-term human history2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage is the scene where the acts of the anthropos, the human being, are celebrated (sometimes condemned), commemorated, and enacted. As a central stage for remembrance of bygone human generations, it is pertinent to ask what is the relation of heritage to the concept of Anthropocene – the era of humans, and how does Anthropocene relate to the longer history of the places in question.

    When Stroemer and Crutzen first published the term Anthropocene in 2000, they proposed latter part of the 18th c as the border line between Holocene and Anthropocene, coinciding roughly with the invention of steam engine. Latter discussions have concentrated mostly on the European industrial revolution from 1800 onwards and the advent of the nuclear age as the borderlines. Archaeologists in their turn have argued against these Eurocentric definitions and maintain that Anthropocene is essentially co-extensive with Holocene, since early civilizations also engineered their landscapes extensively, having a considerable impact on the whole earth system. This definition would effectively blur the boundaries of the so-called natural heritage, acknowledging that most of our extant natural environment is as a matter of fact natureculture.

    Industrial heritage is the heritage type that most explicitly works to perpetuate the onset of Anthropocene in human memory. Most of its protected objects commemorate the moment when humans became drivers of the earth system change. Mining and burning of coal, long-haul transport and global movement, metalwork, harnessing water, military infrastructure, new ways of intensive resource use and production – all these and even more speak of human achievements in this new era of human dominance, often coupled with stories of oppression, environmental destruction and injustice.

    On the other hand, also the other heritage sites that commemorate more long-term histories, such as religious or agricultural heritage sites bear an inevitable trace of the Anthropocene. Their endangerment, the need to preserve these sites mostly surges from the huge socio-economic changes accompanying Modernization and the Great Acceleration. Were it not for intensification of agriculture, increasing urbanization, depopulation of marginal villages, growing resource use, increasing automobile use and whatever other indices of Industrial revolution and Great Acceleration you may think of, these places may have never become endangered. Be it Shirakawa and Gokayama villages of Hida, pilgrimage routes of Mt Fuji or Ōmi Hachiman channels of Lake Biwa, their today’s appearance bears a stamp of Anthropocene. Heritage policy where each site is preserved as it was at the moment of taking it under protection, perpetuates this face of Anthropocenic abandonment forever.

    Nuclear heritage – the heritage of the shorter Anthropocene definition, preferred by the Stratigraphic Commission – is a particularly challenging type where the difficulties arise from the invisibility of true nuclear legacy. In cultural heritage, this legacy is partly made visible, whereas designating nature protection areas on the nuclear sites, the invisible but present effects of the nuclear legacy are concealed. Once again, the essence of natural heritage becomes blurred in a new type of natureculture, a technoenvironment.

  • 3.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Classic and cute: Framing biodiversity in Japan through rural landscapes and mascot charactersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Constructing agricultural and industrial heritage in Hida region, Japan2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation analyses the tension between the construction of agricultural and industrial heritage in Japan. The nostalgic image of historical landscapes is increasingly penetrating into protection policies as a model of sustainability, focusing primarily on rice production landscapes. Yet Japan is an old industrial country. In a prevalent discourse of unique national harmony with nature, industrial heritage sites need to appeal to a different sense of uniqueness and value.

    This paper traces two UNESCO World Heritage sites, Tomioka Silk Mill (inscribed in 2014) and Historic Villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama (inscribed in 1995), and their reception and representation in relation to changing ideas on value, heritage and Japaneseness. Both of the sites are tightly related to silk industry, but while Tomioka is recognized as the cradle of industrial Japan, Hida region is increasingly interpreted as an isolated rural settlement and linked with traditional agricultural activities, including rice cultivation, which, however, is extremely recent for the area. In addition, both of the areas are tightly interconnected in 20th century Japanese literature and film through stories of serious exploitation of adolescent girls in early Japanese silk industry.

  • 5.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Econationalism, (Self-)Orientalism or Environmental Justice Movements? Comment on the panel "Environmentalism of the Finno-Ugric and Samoyedic peoples2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fuji. Fuji? Fuji! The community and the “universal value“ of the world heritage.2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Greening the History: Discourses of Nation, Ecology and Environmental Protection in contemporary Japan2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nation-building brings along the definition of new national landscapes, drawing of new lines of division, new peripheries and centres. Legal frameworks of ownership, use and protection among others inscribe these cultural concepts on real landscapes. The present paper follows the development of the Japanese rural rice cultivation landscapes from a landscape of production that has to support the nation’s colonial endeavour before the WWII, through the peripheral backyards of the modernizing industrial Japan after the WWII, to the embodiment of the ancient Japanese wisdom and harmony with nature from the late 20th century onwards. Inscribing new national landscapes on the state territories bundled together infrastructure development, nature protection and the promotion of tourism. From the second half of the 20th century, but especially from 1990s onwards, the reasoning of the values of national landscapes has become increasingly dominated by ecological discourse that – being by nature a systemic metalanguage ­– naturalizes the national value in scientific terms. In the context of raising nationalism and under the protective framework of ecology, the satoyama ecosystems that unite two basic national landscape ideals, the forests and rice paddies, become a symbol of sustainable resource use and superior moral character of the nation, manifested in the ancient wisdom of the traditional agricultural practice.  Strong ideological stands have their inevitable consequences for the real life landscape management, and not only within Japan: afforestation and constantly growing forest reserve (and consequent large-scale timber import for sustaining traditional building techniques), expanding areas of protection for satoyama landscapes that are hardly sustainable in today’s rural settings, resuscitation of several lost landscape features and whitewashing Japan’s history of industrial disasters by claiming a special harmonious relationship with nature, unseen in the Western civilization.

  • 8.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Internal and external perception in conceptualizing home landscapes: Japanese examples2014In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 51-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing the conceptual pair external-internal, the present article traces how meanings and ideals are generated in landscapes. It analyses the dialectics between the firsthand landscape experiences acquired in the course of everyday life activities and externally created models of value and meaning that have been adopted by the locals, replacing or dominating over the former ones. With rice and reed fields at the banks of Lake Biwa in Central Japan as a backdrop, this phenomenon is described at personal, community and cultural level.

  • 9.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Interplay of aesthetics, national nostalgia and sustainability in the protection policies of the rice paddy landscapes in central Japan2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Maastikusemiootika: (Landscape Semiotics)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nihon no shizen wo nomikomu 'satoyama'. (‘Satoyama’ that has devoured the Japanese nature’).2017In: Satoyama to iu monogatary - kankyô jinbungaku no taiwa (The Fairy-Tale of of Satoyama: Conversations from Environmental Humanities) / [ed] Masami, Y.; Kuroda, S., Tokyo: Bensei shuppan , 2017, p. 96-118Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    On Dogs, Aurora and Ships: Bipolar Imagination in Japan2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Japan is a relative newcomer in the Arctic politics as it has no territorial claims in the Arctic, nor an early history of Arctic expeditions. Instead, modernizing Japan focused its attention to Antarctica from as early as 1910. Today, Japan is showing increasing interest in Arctic politics and management, insisting that important decisions should not be taken only by the Arctic States and the Arctic Ocean coastal States. The Japanese government view is that the Arctic “should be recognized as a part of the common heritage of mankind. The international community should protect this area and use it for peaceful purposes”. Japan explains its polar interests by being a maritime country and although the country’s main activities in the polar regions pertain to scientific research, many consider Japan’s real motivation to be in the potential Northern shipping routes. Accordingly, the Arctic figures in the government documents as empty fields of water, ice and hidden treasures, subjected to international scientific research and management – quite like the Antarctic. Indigenous people are almost invisible. I will present an ongoing research project into the commonalities in the Japanese imagination of the two poles. Through the analyses of museum exhibits and other cultural phenomena, I will discuss a variety of images where the perception of the two poles gets blurred, notably the Japanese obsession with Aurora borealis, snow fields, but also the moving bodies of icebreakers, whales – and dogs. A telling example is the story of 15 Japanese Karafuto breed dogs whose tragic fate after the first Japanese Antarctic overwinter camp has become the dominant cultural narrative of polar research. The block-buster movie of the expedition, “Tales of Antarctica”, is largely shot in the Canadian Arctic and it can be argued that the origin of the dogs in the former Northern territories of Japan (Sakhalin) helps to project Japan as a place with deep cultural ties to Arctic

  • 13.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    People and animals in the shadow of Antarctic.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Protection Policies through a Lens: The Role of Representations in the Environmental Protection of Japanese Agrarian Landscapes2014In: Framing Nature: Signs, Stories and Ecologies of Meaning. Abstracts, Tartu: University of Tartu, 2014, p. 122-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental discourse and natural imagery hold a special place in national self-descriptions, and different visual and verbal representations of nature, that is nature through a lens or a pen, play a crucial part in establishing which elements belong to the “desirable national environment” and what parts of landscape are rather negated or ignored. Without underestimating the emotional bonds of each individual with their home landscapes, the present paper will address the role of visual (both photo and cinematographic) and verbal representations of landscapes in shaping public discourse on nature and environmental protection policies.

    The discussion will focus on the representation of traditional rice agriculture landscapes at Lake Biwa, Japan, and their role in shaping local environmental consciousness and protection policies. Framing nature in beauty images has been crucial in Japanese environmental protection already from the establishment of early national parks that was carried out hand in hand with big publicity campaigns of major train companies. Well framed visual representations that cut off today’s industrial or urban everyday landscapes are central to the discourse on national landscapes in today’s Shiga Prefecture, where photographic and cinematographic works of Imamori Mitsuhiko have highlighted near-dissappeared traditional rice agriculture ecosystems. In a skillful montage, beautiful traditional villages are depicted as embodiments of traditional Japanese wisdom about co-existance with nature and have found ardent fans among middle-aged town people who happily immerse themselves in further “framing activities”: nature walks, food tasting, ecotourism etc. “The biggest challenge was to keep garbage out of the shot,” says the framer, Imamori Mitsuhiko himself about shooting “Satoyama”, the NHK and BBC co-produced film on water cycles in traditional rice farming villages at lake Shiga. For the consumer of framed images and experiences, it is the correspondence between the first-hand experience and neat images that matters most, appears from the interviews with participants at various tourist events in traditional agricultural villages. And even though the contact of these participants with the real Shiga prefecture remains largely on the level of framed nature, thus excluding the majority of the prefecture’s present reality, the conscious popularization activity of Imamori Mitsuhiko and subsequent satoyama boom has considerably increased the popular awareness about landscape heritage both on local and national level and has in fact helped to preserve several landscape elements that had already almost dissappeared.

  • 15.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Semiotic study of landscapes between bodies and representations2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lindström, Kati
    University of Tartu.
    Transparent bodies: The lack of bodily dimension in the representations of historical landscapes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Universal heritage value, community identities and world heritage: Forms, functions, processes and context at a changing Mt FujiManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Numerous international documents underline the high identity value of cultural heritage for local communities and its potential for sustainable development. Simultaneously, the inclusion in UNESCO’s World Heritage List depends on the outstanding universal value that presumes a global community and prioritizes global heritage value before the local ones. This setup holds potential tension.

    This paper discusses how to define heritage communities and access their heritage identities, differentiating between landscape forms, functions, processes and context. The case study of Mt Fuji World Heritage is used to illustrate the model. While global and national communities emphasize the form of the heritage and policies target the preservation of the present visual shape, the local and religious communities identify with the functions and practices embodied by the sites. Not all communities identify with the proposed interpretative context for Mt Fuji heritage value. Additional tension arises from the Eurocentric mind-set behind world heritage expertise.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-31 10:14
  • 18.
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Whose identity should World Heritage support2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Jones, Thomas E.
    Mount Fuji’s Listing as a Cultural World Heritage Site: Challenges of Fragmented Governance2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage management is often fragmented, and Japan is no exception with considerable horizontal fragmentation between municipal, prefectural and central government agencies. For example, the Ministry of Environment (MoE) is the legally-designated administrator of national parks but their institutional objectives are often inconsistent with those of other state agencies, such as the MAFF (a significant landowner) and MEXT (responsible for cultural heritage). This poses serious challenges for management of large mixed type heritage where objects are not easily classified as natural or cultural. Mount Fuji, UNESCO World Cultural Heritage since 2013, consists of a serial nomination of sites within Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park that overlaps with the administrative territory of 15 municipalities and two prefectures. This complex combination of multiple stakeholders can have the unintended side-effect of pitting government agencies against each other, and against private stakeholders such as mountain huts who maintain certain trails. The nomination process was challenged by the legislation and established procedures that struggle to accommodate natural landscapes functioning as cultural objects of worship and art. The fragmented management style was typified by subordination to business interests and avoidance of disrupting the status quo. One solution was to focus on sites that were already listed under national law. Site maintenance is typically split between several departments and institutions that are subjected to regular rotation of human resources. 13 However, the UNESCO listing process opened a window for greater cooperation. After tentative listing in 2007, a cross-cutting committee was formed in 2009 to standardize place names, and remove unnecessary or inferior trail signs. The simplified system of colour-coded, multi-lingual signs along 4 main trails symbolizes how the ‘carrot’ of UNESCO inscription provided an incentive to galvanize diverse stakeholders into collaborative action, but it is difficult to envisage how the momentum can maintain cross-cutting partnerships now that inscription has been achieved.

  • 20.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Koff, Tiiu
    Tallinn University.
    Antropotseen: Inimeste ajastu2015In: Horisont, ISSN 0134-2282, Vol. 5, p. 26-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Kull, Kalevi
    Palang, Hannes
    Landscape semiotics: Contribution to culture theory2014In: Estonian Approaches to Culture Theory / [ed] Kull, K.; Lang, V., Tartu: University of Tartu, 2014, p. 110-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Kull, Kalevi
    Palang, Hannes
    Semiotic study of landscapes: An overview from semiology to ecosemiotics.: 风景的符号学研究:从索绪尔符号学到生态符号学2014In: Semiotics of Life: Approaches from Tartu: (生命符号学:塔尔图的进路) / [ed] Kull, Kalevi; Magnus, Riin;Peng, Jia (trans.); Tang, Li (trans.), Chengdu: Sichuan University Press , 2014, p. 183-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Kull, Kalevi
    Palang, Hannes
    The semiotic study of landscapes: From the Saussure's semiotics to ecological semiotics.: (风景的符号学研究——从索绪尔符号学到生态符号学)2014In: Academic Journal of Poyang Lake [鄱阳湖学刊], ISSN 1674-6848, Vol. 4, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Nugin, Raili
    Tallinn University.
    Palang, Hannes
    Tallinn University.
    Jaago, Tiiu
    University of Tartu.
    Kannike, Anu
    Kull, Kalevi
    Printsmann, Anu
    Siim, Pihla Maria
    Piirirohkus ja mälu: (Memory and multiplicity of boundaries)2014In: Eesti kultuuri süvamehhanismid / [ed] Tasa, Monika; Rumm, Kaija, 2014, p. 13-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ortiz Villalón, Cristian
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Kõhuussid, katk ja kasvajad: tervis keskkonnaajaloos: (Stomach bugs, pest and tumours: health in environmental history)2015In: Horisont, ISSN 0134-2282, Vol. 5, p. 56-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Palang, Hannes
    Tallinn University.
    Kull, Kalevi
    University of Tartu.
    Landscape semiotics2018In: The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies / [ed] Peter Howard, Ian H. Thompson, Emma Waterton, Routledge, 2018, 2ndChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Plath, Ulrike
    Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Bodies between catastrophes and control2015In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 171-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Plath, Ulrike
    Tallinn University.
    Intervjuu Austria keskkonnaajaloolase Prof. Verena Winiwarteriga.2015In: Tuna, ISSN 1406-4030, Vol. 2, p. 146-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Fuji as a European Mountain? Universal heritage value, local identities and changing landscapes at a new world heritage site.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mt. Fuji is a mountain that is visible from the whole world – as a symbol of the Japanese state or the great Orient, its images are featured in virtually every Japan-related brochure and merchandize well beyond  the geographical constraints of the Archipelago.

    The present paper asks several provocative questions: to what extent are the Western perceptions of Mt. Fuji  embedded into the constructed „universal heritage value“ in its UNESCO World Heritage nomination process; how does the defined universal value relate to the local identity value of Mt Fuji cultural landscape; and how does the contemporary perception of both universal and local value of the place relate to the evidence of its long-term  history of land use? To what extent can we claim that its nomination as a „sacred place and source of artistic inspiration“ casts the mountain in terms of European values and perception of the place, and how well does it accommodate different identities and uses on local level? And on the other hand, to what  extent are the present local identities related to historical land use before the rapid modernization?

    To answer these and related questions, we will use a variety of sources from interviews with people involved in world heritage nomination process, nomination materials, media sources, but also historical evidence of past landscape use, such as maps, historical documents and archaeological data. While the people involved in the construction of „universal value“ lament the excessive pressure by the Western experts, the local inhabitants express bewilderment about the nomination as a site of worship and art. How and by whom was the mountain used is a key question in addressing these claims. An additional theoretical issue involved in the discussion is how much should the present local identities and evaluations be included in the construction of heritage value in case of a massive landscape change that completely changes millenia-long practices? 

  • 30.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Idealised landscapes and heritage: sustainability in mountain Japan2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Taming the Lake: Modernization of Water at Lake Biwa2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lake Biwa is the largest freshwater lake in Japan with the present surface of 670 square kilometers and a rich ecosystem that has merited its listing as Ramsar Wetland in 1993. On the other hand, it has had a remarkable historical and cultural importance as a major junction for land and water traffic to and from Kyoto but also as a major provider of fish and rice to the ancient capital. In water management, modernization has meant mostly three things. First, land reclamation that led to the disappearance of most satellite lakes and reed fields that acted as buffer zones and cleaning mechanism for wastewaters running in from the irrigation channels of the paddy fields. Second, the control of water level in the lake that has proved to be detrimental for the numerous endemic fish species that depended on the seasonal swelling of the lake. And third, establishing land transportation, replacing the older water-centred transport routes. All these three questions were closely related to the new modern economy of increasing industrialization, inter-regional division of labour, development of agribusiness, privatization of lake shores and tourism, bringing about profound changes in water quality, species composition and the locals’ perception of the lake.

  • 32.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Zeballos Velarde, Carlos Renzo
    Taming the Lake: Modernization of Water at Lake Biwa2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Nugin, Raili
    et al.
    Jaago, Tiiu
    Lindström, Kati
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kannike, Anu
    Palang, Hannes
    Kull, Kalevi
    Printsmann, Anu
    Siim, Pihla Maria
    Plurality of pasts and boundaries: Evidence from the last hundred years of EstoniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34. Uchiyama, Junzo
    et al.
    Gillam, Christopher
    Hosoya, Leo Aoi
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Jordan, Peter
    Investigating Neolithization of Cultural Landscapes in East Asia: The NEOMAP Project2014In: Journal of world prehistory, ISSN 0892-7537, E-ISSN 1573-7802, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 197-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neolithic is regarded as one of the most important developments in prehistory, a major cultural threshold marked by combined shifts in economy, technology, ideology, settlement and social organisation. Many foundational ideas about the Neolithic emerged within the context of European archaeology, and substantial work has now been directed at understanding how this 'package' of innovations appeared first in the Near East, and then dispersed steadily out into the rest of northwest Europe. Papers presented in this special issue are an output of the international NEOMAP Project (Neolithization and Modernization: Landscape History on East Asian Inland Seas) (2005-2012), which sought to apply two key approaches drawn from European Neolithic studies to the archaeology of East Asia: (a) the concept of Neolithization, defined as a long-term and historically-contingent process of culture-change; and (b), the contextual study of this process via the framework of cultural landscape research. This exercise has been highly productive, and provides new insights into a series of unique cultural transformations in East Asia, most of which have a very different sequence and character to those in the European Neolithic. It is hoped that, in turn, these comparative insights into the Neolithization of East Asian cultural landscapes will encourage those working on the European Neolithic to look back over their own regional datasets and critically reflect on some of their deeper assumptions about the internal logic and cultural content of the European Neolithic transition. Given the existence of so many fundamentally different kinds of Neolithic across the broader continent of Eurasia, the overall goal of this special issue is to re-kindle international debates about how best to explain each of these distinctive regional Neolithization trajectories.

  • 35.
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    et al.
    Mt Fuji World Heritage Research Centre.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Idealised Landscapes and Heritage: Past and Future Sustainability in Hida2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The designation of historical heritage occurs on the basis of modern values and ideologies that are supposedly embodied in the cultural landscapes of the nominated area, without considering the actual historical contexts supporting them. This paper discusses the meaning of historical heritage in the modern socio-cultural contexts by presenting results of the GIS analysis of a historical database in the Hida Province (present Gifu Prefecture), as an example, focusing on the observed historical changes from a landscape perspective.

                          While located in deep mountains, Hida villages are often marketed as secluded places, cut off from the Modern world ("the last unexplored area of Japan" according to the UNESCO world heritage nomination documents), with a high level of auto-sufficiency and harmonious relationship with the environment. However, the analyses show that Hida has never been isolated; rather, the inter-regional trading network was the pre-requisite for the formation of this regional landscape throughout history, since it was dependent on gunpowder and silk industry. Originally nominated for its architectural qualities, the Hida villages are increasingly perceived through the prism of ecologically sustainable traditional rice farming. Contrasting historical data with modern discourse analysis, we question the concept of sustainability in imagined past and protected present landscapes.

1 - 35 of 35
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