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  • 1.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Shahgaldi, Kambiz
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nowak, Jacek
    Ultrasonographic strain imaging is superior to conventional non-invasive measures of vascular stiffness in the detection of age-dependent differences in the mechanical properties of the common carotid artery2010In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 630-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Elastic properties of large arteries have been shown to deteriorate with age and in the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease. In this study, the performance of ultrasonographic strain measurements was compared to conventional measures of vascular stiffness in the detection of age-dependent differences in the elastic properties of the common carotid artery.

    Methods and results: In 10 younger (25-28 years, 4 women) and 10 older (50-59 years, 4 women) healthy individuals, global and regional circumferential and radial strain variables were measured in the short-axis view of the right common carotid artery using ultrasonographic two-dimensional (2D) strain imaging with recently introduced speckle tracking technique. Conventional elasticity variables, elastic modulus (Ep) and β stiffness index, were calculated using M-mode sonography and non-invasive blood pressure measurements. Global and regional circumferential systolic strain and strain rate values were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 for regional late systolic strain rate) in the younger individuals, whereas the values of conventional elasticity variables in the same group were lower (p < 0.05). Among all strain and conventional elasticity variables, principal component analysis and its regression extension identified only circumferential systolic strain variables as contributing significantly to the observed discrimination between the younger and older age groups.

    Conclusion: Ultrasonographic 2D-strain imaging is a sensitive method for the assessment of elastic properties in the common carotid artery, being in this respect superior to conventional measures of vascular elasticity. The method has potential to become a valuable non-invasive tool in the detection of early atherosclerotic vascular changes.

  • 2. Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Multivariate relationships between pain intensity and other aspects of health in rheumatoid arthritis - cross sectional and five year longitudinal analyses (the Swedish TIRA project)2008In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 30, no 19, p. 1429-1438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. This study analyses the relationships between pain intensity and other aspects of health commonly used to assess disease activity and disability in early rheumatoid arthritis and examines whether such relationships were different between women and men. Subjects and methods. This study included the 189 patients (69% women) with early RA (symptoms < 12 months at diagnosis) still remaining in the Swedish TIRA cohort 5 years after inclusion. Disease activity and disability was assessed 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months (M0-M60) after inclusion by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), number of swollen and tender joints, physicians global assessment of disease activity (PGA), grip force average over 10 seconds (Grippit), Grip Ability Test (GAT), Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI) in hand, lower limb and upper limb, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and pain intensity measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The variables were divided into meaningful blocks according to the correlation structure in a principal component analysis (PCA) at M60. Using hierarchical partial least squares (PLS) analyses, this study investigated the blocks cross-sectionally to test for correlations with pain intensity at M0 and M60. The blocks at M0 were also used as predictors of pain intensity at M60 in a hierarchical PLS. Results. The strongest relationship was found between pain intensity and the second block, consisting of HAQ and SOFI-lower limb at the cross-sectional analyses in both women and men. The block representing disease activity (i.e., ESR, CRP, PGA, and swollen and tender joints) had the weakest relation to pain intensity. According to the longitudinal analyses, the disease activity variables (block 1) at M0 had the strongest relationship to pain intensity at M60 in men. In contrast, HAQ and SOFI-lower limb (block 2) at M0 had a strong relation to pain intensity in women.

  • 3. Borsbo, Bjorn
    et al.
    Gerdle, Bjorn
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Impact of the interaction between self-efficacy, symptoms and catastrophising on disability, quality of life and health in with chronic pain patients2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 1387-1396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To investigate the interactions between self-efficacy - including subcomponents - and symptoms (pain, depression and anxiety), catastrophising, disability, quality of life and health in a population of patients with chronic pain. Method. The study used 433 patients with chronic pain including 47 patients with spinal cord injury-related pain, 150 patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders and 236 patients with fibromyalgia. The participants answered a postal questionnaire that provided background data, pain intensity and duration and psychological- and health-related variables. Results. In the multivariate context, depression, anxiety, catastrophising and disability were intercorrelated. Self-efficacy correlated positively with variables of quality of life and general health. These two groups of variables were negatively correlated. The pain variables - duration of pain, pain intensity and spreading of pain - formed a third group of variables. Self-efficacy function was negatively correlated to these three pain variables. When regressing disability, quality of life and health, we found that self-efficacy had a positive impact whereas symptoms, catastrophising and pain had a negative influence on these aspects. Different patterns of influencing variables were discerned for the three different analyses, and specific patterns of the subscales of self-efficacy corresponded to specific patterns of negative factors for the outcome of disability, quality of life and health. Conclusion. There is a complex interaction of psychological factors and symptoms and their positive and negative influence on disability, quality of life and health. The results indicate that it might be important to assess and influence both enhancing and detoriating factors to ensure an effective pain management programme.

  • 4. Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Catastrophizing, depression, and pain: Correlation with and influence on quality of life and health - A study of chronic whiplash-associated disorders2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study were: (i) to classify subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing, and investigate distribution in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders; and (h) to investigate how these subgroups were distributed and inter-related multivariately with respect to consequences such as health and quality of life outcome measures. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Patients: A total of 275 consecutive chronic pain patients with whiplash-associated disorders who were referred to a university hospital. Methods: The following data were obtained by means of self-report questionnaires: pain intensity in neck and shoulders, background history, Beck Depression Inventory, the catastrophizing scale of Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, the SF-36 Health Survey, and the EuroQol. Results: Principal component analysis was used to recognize subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing. These subgroups have specific characteristics according to perceived health and quality of life, and the degree of depression appears to be the most important influencing factor. Conclusion: From a clinical point of view, these findings indicate that it is important to assess patients for intensity of pain, depression, and catastrophizing when planning a rehabilitation programme. Such an evaluation will help individualize therapy and intervention techniques so as to optimize the efficiency of the programme.

  • 5. Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Gerdle, Björn
    The complex interplay between pain intensity, depression, anxiety and catastrophising with respect to quality of life and disability2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 19, p. 1605-1613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To identify subgroups of patients with chronic pain based on the occurrence of depression, anxiety and catastrophising and the duration of pain and pain intensity. In addition to this, the relationship between the subgroups with respect to background variables, diagnosis, pain-related disability and perceived quality of life are investigated. Methods. This study used 433 patients with chronic pain including 47 patients with spinal cord injury-related pain, 150 with chronic whiplash associated disorders and 236 with fibromyalgia. The participants answered a postal questionnaire that provided background data, pain intensity and duration and psychological and health-related items. Results. On the basis of depression, anxiety, catastrophising, pain intensity and duration, we identified subgroups of patients with chronic pain that differed with respect to perceived quality of life, disability and diagnosis. The psychological factors, especially depression, significantly influenced perceived quality of life and disability. Pain intensity and duration play a minor role with respect to quality of life, although pain intensity is associated to perceived disability. Conclusions. The results of this study highlight the importance of not looking at patients with chronic pain as a homogenous entity. A detailed assessment, including psychological factors with emphasis on depressive symptoms, might be essential for planning and carrying through treatment and rehabilitation.

  • 6. Gerdle, Bjorn
    et al.
    Lemming, Dag
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    Larsson, Britt
    Peolsson, Michael
    Rosendal, Lars
    Biochemical alterations in the trapezius muscle of patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) - A microdialysis study2008In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind the development of chronic trapezius myalgia in patients with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) appear to involve both peripheral and central components, but the specific contribution of alterations in muscle is not clear. Female patients with WAD and involvement of trapezius (N = 22) and female controls (N = 20; CON) were studied during an experiment compromised of rest (baseline), 20 min repetitive low.-force exercise and 120 min recovery. Their interstitial concentrations of serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, potassium, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and blood flow were determined in the trapezius muscle using a microdialysis technique. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles were also assessed. In WAD, we found signs of generalized hypersensitivity according to PPT. The WAD group had significantly higher interstitial [IL-6] and [5-HT] in the trapezius than the CON. [Pyruvate] was overall significantly lower in WAD, and with lactate it showed another time-pattern throughout the test. In the multivariate regression analysis of pain intensity [5-HT] was the strongest regressor and positively correlated with pain intensity in WAD. In addition, blood flow, [pyruvate], and [potassium] influenced the pain intensity in a complex time dependent way. These findings may indicate that peripheral nociceptive processes are activated in WAD with generalized hypersensitivity for pressure and they are not identical with those reported in chronic work-related trapezius myalgia, which could indicate different pain mechanisms.

  • 7. Hyden, L. C.
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Pain gestures: the orchestration of speech and body gestures2002In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 325-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about the use and function of gestures in pain communication. More specifically how we can communicate an internal bodily experience like pain with the help of gestures. This is of great importance both in everyday situations and in medical consultations of various types. Our focus in this article is on the issues of the gesture as a communicative resource, how verbal and nonverbal communicative resources are related to each other and in what way gestures contribute to the structure of different types of pain. Thirty-seven patients have been interviewed about their pain experiences and the main result is that several communicative modalities are interwoven in the pain accounts. Three different functions of gestures were identified: the pointing, iconic and symbolic functions. The clinical relevance of this approach to gestures in pain communication is to take note of the intricate interplay of different communicative resources used in the pain description, and to emphasize both verbal and nonverbal interaction in the clinical conversation as a resource in the care situation.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Balzano, Rita
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Winter, Reidar
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Wave intensity wall analysis: a novel noninvasive method to measure wave inntensity2009In: Heart and Vessels, ISSN 0910-8327, E-ISSN 1615-2573, Vol. 24, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wave intensity analysis is a concept providing information about the interaction of the heart and the vascular system. Originally, the technique was invasive. Since then new noninvasive methods have been developed. A recently developed ultrasound technique to estimate tissue motion and deformation is speckle-tracking echocardiography. Speckle tracking-based techniques allow for accurate measurement of movement and deformation variables in the arterial wall in both the radial and the longitudinal direction. The aim of this study was to test if speckle tracking-derived deformation data could be used as input for wave intensity calculations. The new concept was to approximate changes of flow and pressure by deformation changes of the arterial wall in longitudinal and radial directions. Flow changes (dU/dt) were approximated by strain rate (sr, 1/s) of the arterial wall in the longitudinal direction, whereas pressure changes (dP/dt) were approximated by sign reversed strain rate (1/s) in the arterial wall in the radial direction. To validate the new concept, a comparison between the newly developed Wave Intensity Wall Analysis (WIWA) algorithm and a commonly used and validated wave intensity system (SSD-5500, Aloka, Tokyo, Japan) was performed. The studied population consisted of ten healthy individuals (three women, seven men) and ten patients (all men) with coronary artery disease. The present validation study indicates that the mechanical properties of the arterial wall, as measured by a speckle tracking-based technique are a possible input for wave intensity calculations. The study demonstrates good visual agreement between the two systems and the time interval between the two positive peaks (W1-W2) measured by the Aloka system and the WIWA system correlated for the total group (r = 0.595, P < 0.001). The correlation for the diseased subgroup was r = 0.797, P < 0.001 and for the healthy subgroup no significant correlation was found (P > 0.05). The results of the study indicate that the mechanical properties of the arterial wall could be used as input for wave intensity calculations. The WIWA concept is a promising new method that potentially provides several advantages over earlier wave intensity methods, but it still has limitations and needs further refinement and larger studies to find the optimal clinical use.

  • 9.
    Lindberg, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Grönlund, C.
    Granåsen, G.
    Karlsson, J. S.
    Peolsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Tissue strain from Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) during sub-maximal isotonic muscle contractions2010In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany: Vol. 25/4 Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics, Springer Publishing Company, 2010, Vol. 25/4, p. 1554-1556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) as a method to quantify the deformation of skeletal muscle tissue during contraction. The parameters used to describe tissue dynamics in this study were strain and strain rate, respectively. Eight subjects were evaluated performing submaximal isotonic contractions of biceps brachii before and after muscle fatigue.

  • 10. Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Brodin, Lars-Ake
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    A tissue velocity ultrasound imaging investigation of the dorsal neck muscles during resisted isometric extension2010In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 567-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with neck pain exhibit altered patterns of muscle patterning, but limited investigations have been carried out on these alterations or muscle patterning in healthy volunteers. This study investigated the tissue motion of the dorsal neck muscles at the C4 segmental level in 15 healthy subjects during manually resisted head extension. Doppler-based tissue velocity ultrasound imaging (TVI) was used to detect regional tissue deformation, providing indirect evidence of inter-muscular movement patterning. The deep muscles, multifidus and semispinalis, had different muscular movement patterning than the superficial muscles, especially the trapezius muscle. The semispinalis cervicis (SSCerv) was the first deformed upon exercise initiation, followed by multifidus and semispinalis capitis (SSCap). The semispinalis muscles, notably capitis, exhibited a high rate of deformation during the exercise. The trapezius muscle exhibited the least and lowest deformation rate. In conclusion, TVI provided detailed information on regional tissue activity and muscle movement patterning among the dorsal neck muscles. In future studies, data from patients with neck disorders will have to be matched to data from healthy volunteers in a variety of situations and activities.

  • 11. Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Predictive factors for long-term outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion: a multivariate data analysis2008In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 406-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a prospective randomized study to investigate predictive factors for short- and long-term outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) as measured by current pain intensity on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and by disability using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Current understanding about how preoperative and short-term outcome data predict long-term outcome is sparse, and there are few studies involving analysis of short-term follow-up using multivariate approaches with quantification of the relative importance of each variable studied. A total of 95 patients were randomly allocated for ACDF with the cervical intervertebral fusion cage or the Cloward procedure. The mean follow-up time was 19 months (range 12-24) for short-term follow-up and 76 months (range 56-94 months) for long-term. Background factors, radiologically detected findings, physiological measurements, treatment type, pain, and disability were used as potential predictors. Multivariate statistical analysis by projection to latent structures was used to investigate predictors of importance for short- and long-term outcome of ACDF. A "preoperative" low disability and pain intensity, non-smoking status, male sex, good hand strength, and an active range of motion (AROM) in the neck were significant predictors for good short- and long-term outcomes. The short-term outcome data were better at predicting long-term outcome than were baseline data. Radiologically detected findings and surgical technique used were mainly insignificant as predictors. We suggest that the inclusion criteria for ACDF should be based on a bio-psycho-social model including NDI. NDI may also be regarded as an important outcome measurement in evaluation of ACDF.

  • 12.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Ake
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Tissue motion pattern of ventral neck muscles investigated by tissue velocity ultrasonography imaging2010In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 109, no 5, p. 899-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We designed this experimental study to investigate tissue motions and thus infer the recruitment pattern of the ventral neck muscles [sternocleidomastoid (SCM), longus capitis (Lca), and longus colli (Lco)] at the C4-C5 level in healthy volunteers during isometric manual resistance of the head in flexion in a seated position. This exercise is used in the physiotherapeutic treatment of neck pain and is assumed to activate the deep ventral muscles, but the assumption has not been clearly evaluated. Neck flexors of 16 healthy volunteers (mean age 24 years, SD 3.7) were measured using ultrasonography with strain and strain rate (SR) tissue velocity imaging (TVI) during isometric contraction of flexor muscles. TVI involves using Doppler imaging to study tissue dynamics. All three muscles showed a deformation compared to rest. Except for the initial contraction phase, Lco exhibited a lower strain than Lca and SCM but was the only muscle with a significant change in SR between the phases. When the beginning of the contraction phase was analysed, Lco was the first to be deformed among most volunteers, followed by Lca and then SCM. The exercise investigated seems to be useful as a "stabilizing" exercise for Lco. Our suggestion is that in further research, Lco and Lca should be investigated as separate muscles. TVI could be used to study tissue motions and thus serve as an indicator of muscle patterning between the neck flexors, with the possibility of separating Lco and Lca.

  • 13. Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Gerdle, Björn
    Generalized pain is associated with more negative consequences than local or regional pain: A study of chronic whiplash-associated disorders2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The main aims of this study were: (i) to determine, for chronic whiplash-associated disorders, whether widespread pain has more severe consequences for other symptoms and different aspects of perceived health than does local/regional pain; (ii) to investigate whether pain, depression, and symptoms not directly related to pain are intercorrelated and to what extent these symptoms correlate with catastrophizing according to the Coping Strategy Questionnaire. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Patients: A total of 275 consecutive chronic pain patients with whiplash-associated disorders who were referred to a university hospital. Methods: Background history, Beck Depression Inventory, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, the SF-36 Health Survey and EuroQol were used to collect data. Results: Spreading of pain was associated with negative consequences with respect to pain intensity and prevalence of other symptoms, life satisfaction/quality and general health. The subjects differ with respect to the presence of symptoms not directly related to pain. A minor part of the variation in Back Depression Inventory was explained by direct aspects of pain, indicating that, to some extent, generalization of pain is related to catastrophizing thoughts. Conclusion: Widespread pain was associated with negative consequences with respect to pain intensity, prevalence of other symptoms including depressive symptoms, some aspects of coping, life satisfaction and general health.

  • 14. Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Coping in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: A descriptive study2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are few studies of the way patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders cope with pain and other aspects of the condition. This study analyses: (a) gender differences in coping strategies; (b) whether the patients can be sub-grouped based on their coping strategies and whether the sub-groups differ clinically; and

  • 15.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Larsson, Britt
    Brodin, Lars-Ake
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Gerdle, Björn
    A pilot study using Tissue Velocity Ultrasound Imaging (TVI) to assess muscle activity pattern in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia2008In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different research techniques indicate alterations in muscle tissue and in neuromuscular control of aching muscles in patients with chronic localized pain. Ultrasound can be used for analysis of muscle tissue dynamics in clinical practice. Aim: This study introduces a new muscle tissue sensitive ultrasound technique in order to provide a new methodology for providing a description of local muscle changes. This method is applied to investigate trapezius muscle tissue response especially with respect to specific regional deformation and deformation rates - during concentric shoulder elevation in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia and healthy controls before and after pain provocation. Methods: Patients with trapezius myalgia and healthy controls were analyzed using an ultrasound system equipped with tissue velocity imaging (TVI). The patients performed a standardized 3-cm concentric shoulder elevation before and after pain provocation/exercise at a standardized elevation tempo (30 bpm). A standardized region of interest (ROI), an ellipsis with a size that captures the upper and lower fascia of the trapezius muscle (4 cm width) at rest, was placed in the first frame of the loop registration of the elevation. The ROI was re-anchored frame by frame following the same anatomical landmark in the basal fascia during all frames of the concentric phase. In cardiac measurement, tissue velocities are measured in the axial projection towards and against the probe where red colour represents shortening and red lengthening. In the case of measuring the trapezius muscle, tissue deformation measurements are made orthogonally, thus, indirectly. Based on the assumption of muscle volume incompressibility, blue represents tissue contraction and red relaxation. Within the ROI, two variables were calculated as a function of time: deformation and deformation rate. Hereafter, max, mean, and quadratic mean values (RMS) of each variable were calculated and compared before and after pain provocation/exercise. Results: This new methodology seems valuable when looking at local muscle changes and studying the mechanism behind chronic muscle pain. The univariate analyses indicate that patients with chronic trapezius myalgia after pain provocation due to exercise at group level showed decreased strain and unchanged strain rate while healthy controls had unchanged strain and increased strain rate. However, the multivariate analysis indicates that most patients showed lower levels according to both strain and strain rate after exercise compared to most controls. Conclusion: Tissue velocity imaging can help describe musculoskeletal tissue activity and dynamics in patients with chronic pain conditions. An altered muscle tissue dynamic after pain provocation/exercise among the majority of trapezius myalgia patients compared with the healthy controls was found.

  • 16.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Löfstedt, T.
    Vogt, S.
    Stenlund, H.
    Arndt, A.
    Trygg, J.
    Modelling human musculoskeletal functional movements using ultrasound imaging2010In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 10, p. 9-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A widespread and fundamental assumption in the health sciences is that muscle functions are related to a wide variety of conditions, for example pain, ischemic and neurological disorder, exercise and injury. It is therefore highly desirable to study musculoskeletal contributions in clinical applications such as the treatment of muscle injuries, post-surgery evaluations, monitoring of progressive degeneration in neuromuscular disorders, and so on.The spatial image resolution in ultrasound systems has improved tremendously in the last few years and nowadays provides detailed information about tissue characteristics. It is now possible to study skeletal muscles in real-time during activity.Methods: The ultrasound images are transformed to be congruent and are effectively compressed and stacked in order to be analysed with multivariate techniques. The method is applied to a relevant clinical orthopaedic research field, namely to describe the dynamics in the Achilles tendon and the calf during real-time movements.Results: This study introduces a novel method to medical applications that can be used to examine ultrasound image sequences and to detect, visualise and quantify skeletal muscle dynamics and functions.Conclusions: This new objective method is a powerful tool to use when visualising tissue activity and dynamics of musculoskeletal ultrasound registrations.

  • 17. Rosendal, L.
    et al.
    Kristiansen, J.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Sogaard, K.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Kjaer, M.
    Sorensen, J.
    Larsson, B.
    Increased levels of interstitial potassium but normal levels of muscle IL-6 and LDH in patients with trapezius myalgia2005In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 119, no 03-jan, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind the development of work-related trapezius pain are suggested to involve both peripheral and central components, but the specific contribution of alterations in muscle nociceptive and other substances is not clear. Female patients with chronic trapezius myalgia (N = 19; TM) and female controls (N = 20; CON) were studied at rest, during 20 min repetitive low-force exercise and recovery, and had their interstitial concentrations of potassium (K+), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and collagen turnover determined in the trapezius muscle by the microdialysis technique. K+ levels were at all time points higher in TM than in CON (P < 0.0001). Baseline levels of LDH and IL-6 were similar in both groups. In response to exercise pain intensity, rated perceived exertion, and the concentrations of K+, LDH and IL-6 increased significantly in both groups. [K+] immediately decreased to baseline levels in CON but remained elevated during the first 20 min of recovery in TM (P < 0.01) whereafter it returned to baseline level. In all subjects taken together mean [K+] correlated negatively with pressure pain threshold of trapezius (P < 0.001), positively with mean pain intensity VAS (P < 0.001) and mean perceived exertion (P < 0.001). Rises in muscle LDH and IL-6 as well as the anabolic ratio for collagen type I was not significantly different between groups. In conclusion, patients with chronic pain in the trapezius muscle had increased levels of interstitial potassium. This finding could be causally related to myalgia or secondary to pain due to deconditioned muscle or altered muscle activity pattern.

  • 18. Rosendal, L.
    et al.
    Larsson, B.
    Kristiansen, J.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Sogaard, K.
    Kjaer, M.
    Sorensen, J.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Increase in muscle nociceptive substances and anaerobic metabolism in patients with trapezius myalgia: microdialysis in rest and during exercise2004In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 324-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local metabolic changes are suggested to be involved in muscle pain development in humans. Nineteen women with chronic work-related trapezius myalgia (TM) and 20 healthy female controls (CON) were studied during baseline rest, 20 min repetitive low-force exercise, and 120 min recovery. Interstitial serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, and blood flow were determined by microdialysis in the trapezius muscle. Baseline pressure pain threshold (PPT) was lower (143+/-18 (TM) vs. 269+/-17 (CON) kPa) (mean +/- SEM), pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS) higher (33+/-5 vs. 2+/-1 mm), muscle 5-HT higher (22.9+/-6.7 vs. 3.8+/-1.3 nmol/l), and glutamate higher (47+/-3 vs. 36+/-4 mumol/l) in TM than in CON (all P<0.05), whereas muscle blood flow was similar in groups. Furthermore, muscle pyruvate was higher (180+/-15 vs. 135+/-12 mumol/l) and lactate higher (4.4+/-0.3 vs. 3.1+/-0.3 mmol/l) in TM than in CON (P<0.001). In response to exercise, VAS and glutamate increased in both TM and CON (all P<0.05). In TM only, lactate and pyruvate increased significantly (P<0.02), whereas blood flow increased to similar levels in both groups. During the initial 20 min recovery period, blood flow remained increased in TM (P<0.005) whereas it decreased to baseline levels in CON. In conclusion, patients with chronic work-related TM have increased levels of muscle 5-HT and glutamate that were correlated to pain intensity (r=0.55, P<0.001) and PPT (r=-0.47, P<0.001), respectively. In addition, TM was associated with increased anaerobic metabolism, whereas a normal rise in blood flow was seen with exercise. These findings indicate that peripheral nociceptive processes are active in work-related TM.

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