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  • 1.
    Bogdan, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Cooperative Design of a Robotic Shopping Trolley2009In: The Good, the Bad and the Challenging: the user and the future of information and communication technologies, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Ertl, Dominik
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Göller, Michael
    Green, Anders
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Falb, Jürgen
    Kaindl, Hermann
    Evaluation of robot body movements supporting communication: Towards HRI on the move2011In: New Frontiers in Human–Robot Interaction / [ed] Kerstin Dautenhahn, Joe Saunders, Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011, p. 185-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In designing socially interactive robots we have focused on robot movement and its role in multi-modal human-robot communication. In this chapter we describe design and evaluation of robot body movements supporting communication, investigating the idea of using speed and orientation adjustments as design elements in human-robot interaction. The scenario studied includes a robotic shopping trolley that offers products via speech and GUI to the user while both are moving in a supermarket-like environment. Our results show that if the robot slows down while making such offers, users are more prone to react upon them and to take the product. However, even from our early pre-study with mock-up robots we observed that users tended not to mention the robot’s slow-down movements, even if these movements were shown several times to them during a video-based debriefing. This phenomenon, that users react implicitly on the robot’s movements without being consciously aware of them, was confirmed during an experimental study with a fully integrated robot prototype. We discuss our results by reflecting on human-robot interaction design methods, and we draw implications from the lessons learned in the study of the design of robot behaviours. In particular, we list a whole set of challenges for HRI when both the user and the robot are moving.

  • 3. Böcker, M.
    et al.
    Rodriguez-Ascaso, A.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Schneider, M.
    Pluke, M.
    Zetterström, E.
    Identifying design-for-all constraints in upcoming interaction technologies2010In: Proceedings of the IADIS Int. Conf. Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2010, IHCI, Proceedings of the IADIS Int. Conf. Game and Entertainment Technologies 2010, Part of the MCCSIS 2010, 2010, p. 251-258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a project funded by the Commission of the European Communities (EC) and the European Free Trade Area (EFTA) and carried out by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) in the form of a Specialist Task Force (STF). The starting point of the project is the observation that new information and communication technologies (ICT) are often introduced without taking into account the requirements of elderly and/or disabled users, resulting in products and services that are hardly usable by those users. STF 377 on "Inclusive eServices for all: Optimizing the accessibility and use of upcoming user interaction technology" develops a roadmap of forthcoming user-interaction technologies with a scope of ten years and aims to identify relevant user requirements from an accessibility viewpoint as well as corresponding usability solutions. The project results will, therefore, allow stakeholders in different stages of the research and development lifecycle (researchers, designers, developers, etc.) of services and devices to spot potential difficulties in the design of service user interfaces which could cause elderly or disabled users to experience usability issues, and solutions that rectify those shortcomings will be proposed. At the time of writing, first results are available. However, any comments and contributions can still be considered for inclusion in the final deliverable.

  • 4. Böcker, M.
    et al.
    Rodriguez-Ascaso, A.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Schneider, M.
    Pluke, M.
    Zetterström, E.
    Identifying enablers for future e-Services2010In: 2010 4th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, Pervasive Health 2010, 2010, p. 5482240-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point of the project is the observation that new information and communication technologies (ICT) are often introduced without taking into account the requirements of elderly and/or disabled users, resulting in products and services that are hardly usable by those users. A method for identifying enablers for future e-Services is described. In short it identifies usability problems with future interation technologies and map these future interaction technologies to e-Services. The results of investigations using this method allow stakeholders in different stages of the research and development lifecycle e-Services to spot potential difficulties in the design of user interfaces which could cause elderly or disabled users to experience usability issues.

  • 5.
    Green, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    With a new helper comes new tasks mixed-initiative interaction for robot-assisted shopping2009In: IHRCMICA-2009 Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness: Proceedings of the Workshop on Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness co-located with Ro-Man 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the CommRob project1 we are investigating Robot Assisted Shopping. We are considering the effects on usability when allowing for mixed-initiative dialogue. It is noted that when adding a robotic assistant to a scenario that was previously involving only one agent, two new tasks are created: collaborative interaction, and learning an interface. Evaluation of mixed-initiative dialogue becomes complicated because it is not straightforward to separate the overall task performance from the attributes brought by mixed-initiative interaction.

  • 6.
    Green, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinsson
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Applying the wizard-of-oz framework to cooperative service discovery and configuration2004In: RO-MAN 2004: 13TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON ROBOT AND HUMAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION, PROCEEDINGS, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2004, p. 575-580Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how the Wizard-of-Oz framework can be applied to a service robotics scenario. A scenario the Home Tour Scenario - involving a collaborative service discovery and configuration multimodal dialogue for the robot is described. The role of the wizard operators producing dialogue and robot movements is discussed as well as the specific simulation tools used: the Dialogue Production Tool and the Joystick Navigation Tool. Some attention will be paid to the pilot studies performed as a preparation for the unified Home Tour Scenario.

  • 7.
    Green, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Topp, Elin Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Developing a Contextualized Multimodal Corpus for Human-Robot Interaction2006In: Proceedings of the fifth international conference on language resources and evaluation, 2006, p. 401-406Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development process of a contextualized corpus for research on Human-Robot Communication. The data have been collected in two Wizard-of-Oz user studies performedwith 22 and 5 users respectively in a scenario that is called the HomeTour. In this scenario the users show the environment (a single room, or a whole floor) to the robot using a combination of speech and gestures. The corpus has been transcribed and annotated with respect to gestures and conversational acts, thus forming a core annotation. We have also annotated or linked other types of data, e.g., laser range finder readings, positioning analysis, questionnaire data and task descriptions that form the annotated context of the scenario. By providing a rich set of different annotated data, thecorpus is thus an important resource both for research on natural language speech interfaces for robots and for research on human-robot communication in general.

  • 8.
    Huettenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Topp, Elin A
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Investigating spatial relationships in human-robot interaction2006In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, NEW YORK, NY: IEEE , 2006, p. 5052-5059Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-presence and embodied interaction are two fundamental characteristics of the command and control situation for service robots. This paper presents a study of spatial distances and orientation of a robot with respect to a human user in an experimental setting. Relevant concepts of spatiality from social interaction studies are introduced and related to Human-Robot Interaction (HRI). A Wizard-of-Oz study quantifies the observed spatial distances and spatial formations encountered. However, it is claimed that a simplistic parameterization and measurement of spatial interaction misses the dynamic character and might be counterproductive in the design of socially appropriate robots.

  • 9.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Fetch-an-carry with CERO: observations from a long-term user study with a service robot2002In: 11th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 2002, p. 158-163Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    From HCI to HRI: Designing Interaction for a Service Robot2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Service robots are mobile, embodied artefacts that operate in co presence with their users. This is a challenge for human-robot interaction (HRI) design. The robot’s interfaces must support users in understanding the system’s current state and possible next actions. One aspect in the design for such interaction is to understand users’ preferences and expectations by involving them in the design process. This thesis takes a user-centered design (UCD) perspective and tries to understand the different user roles that exist in service robotics in order to consider possible design implications. Another important aim in the thesis is to understand the spatial management that occurs in face-to-face encounters between humans and robotic systems.

    The Cero robot is an office “fetch-and-carry” robot that supports a user in the transportation of light objects in an office environment. The iterative, user-centered design of the graphical-user interface (GUI) for the Cero robot is presented in Paper I. It is based upon the findings from multiple prototype design- and evaluation iterations. The GUI is one of the robot’s interfacing components, i.e., it is to be seen in the overall interplay of the robot’s physical design and other interface modalities developed in parallel with the GUI. As interaction strategy for the GUI, a graphical representation based upon simplification of the graphical elements as well as hiding the robot system’s complexity in sensing and mission execution is recommended.

    The usage of the Cero robot by a motion-impaired user over a period of three months is presented in Paper II. This longitudinal user study aims to gain insights into the daily usage of such an assistive robot. This approach is complementary to the described GUI design and development process as it allows empirically investigating situated use of the Cero robot as novel service application over a longer period of time with the provided interfaces. Findings from this trial show that the robot and its interfaces provide a benefit to the user in the transport of light objects, but also implies increased independence. The long-term study also reveals further aspects of the Cero robot system usage as part of a workplace setting, including the social context that such a mobile, embodied system needs to be designed for.

    During the long-term user study, bystanders in the operation area of the Cero robot were observed in their attempt to interact with it. To understand better how such bystander users may shape the interaction with a service robot system, an experimental study investigates this special type and role of robot users in Paper III. A scenario in which the Cero robot addresses and asks invited trial subjects for a cup of coffee is described. The findings show that the level of occupation significantly influences bystander users’ willingness to assist the Cero robot with its request.

    The joint handling of space is an important part of HRI, as both users and service robots are mobile and often co-present during interaction. To inform the development of future robot locomotion behaviors and interaction design strategies, a Wizard-of Oz (WOZ) study is presented in Paper IV that explores the role of posture and positioning in HRI. The interpersonal distances and spatial formations that were observed during this trial are quantified and analyzed in a joint interaction task between a robot and its users in Paper V. Findings show that a face-to-face spatial formation and a distance between ~46 to ~122 cm is dominant while initiating a robot mission or instructing it about an object or place.

    Paper VI investigates another aspect on the role of spatial management in the joint task between a robot and its user based upon the study described in Papers IV and V. Taking the dynamics of interaction into account, the findings are that users structure their activities with the robot and that this organizing is observable as small movements in interaction. These small adaptations in posture and orientation signify the transition between different episodes of interaction and prepare for the next interaction exchange in the shared space. The understanding of these spatial management behaviors allow designing human-robot interaction based upon such awareness and active handling of space as a structuring interaction element.

  • 11.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Ertl, Dominik
    Falb, Jürgen
    Kaindl, Hermann
    Göller, Michael
    Evaluation of Robot Body Movements Supporting Communication2010In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction - A Symposium at the AISB 2010 Convention, 2010, p. 42-49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In designing socially interactive robotswe have focused on robot movement and its role in multi-modal human-robot communication. In this paper we describe a user-centred design and evaluation process, investigating the idea of using speed and orientation adjustments as design elements in human-robot interaction. The scenario studied includes a robotic shopping trolley that offers products to the user while both are moving in a supermarket-like environment. Our results show that if the robot slows down while making such offers, users are more prone to react upon them. However, in an early pre-study, performed only with a robot mock-up, we observed that users tended not to notice the robot's slow-down movements while offers are made, even if these movements were shown several times to them during a video-based debriefing. This phenomenon, that users react implicitly on the robot'smovements without being consciously aware of them, was confirmed during an experimental study with a fully integrated robot prototype.We discuss our results by reflecting on human-robot interaction design methods, and we propose implications from the lessons learnt in the study of the design of robot behaviours.

  • 12.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Green, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Norman, Mikael
    Oestreicher, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Involving users in the design of a mobile office robot2004In: IEEE transactions on systems, man and cybernetics. Part C, Applications and reviews, ISSN 1094-6977, E-ISSN 1558-2442, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the experiences from the iterative design of a fetch-and-carry-robot, to be used by motion-impaired people in an office environment. A user-centered approach was chosen, involving several steps of information elicitation to inform the design. We describe the main elements of the design process, the communication and interaction components of the final prototype system, and an evaluation of the system in the form of a longitudinal study. Results from this study confirmed that continuous testing with users is extremely important in the design process for service robots. The trials have also revealed that interaction design for robots should not focus only on the individual user, but that other members in the environment can be seen "secondary users" or "bystanders" who tend to relate to the robot actively in various ways. We conclude that these social and collaborative issues should be studied in future research.

  • 13.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Green, Anders
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Report on user study on the role of posture and postioning in HRI2006Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Pakucs, Botond
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Analog personal information - When you just can't get what you know is available2006In: Int. Symp. Human Factors Telecommun., HFT, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the remote access to analogue information through a Universal Speech Access server by directing a service robot to the site of the needed information. In a proof-of-concept study the transmitting back of an image of the previously electronically inaccessible information is tested to investigate whether analogue personal information resources can be made available to mobile users.

  • 15.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    To help or not to help a service robot2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an experimental study in which people who had never encountered our service robot before were requested to assist it with a task. We call these visiting users "bystanders" to differentiate them from people who belong to the social setting and group in which the robot is operated in and thus are familiar with the robot. In our study 32 subjects were exposed to our robot and requested by it to provide a cup of coffee as part of a delivery mission. We anticipated that people in general would help the robot, dependent upon whether they were busy or had received a demonstration of the robot as introduction. Our results indicate that the willingness of bystanders to help a robot not only is a consequence of the robot initiated interaction, but equally depends on the situation and state of occupation people are in when requested to interact with and assist the robot.

  • 16.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    To help or not to help a service robot2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an experimental study in which people who had never encountered our service robot before were requested to assist it with a task. We call these visiting users "bystanders" to differentiate them from people who belong to the social setting and group in which the robot is operated in and thus are familiar with the robot. In our study 32 subjects were exposed to our robot and requested by it to provide a cup of coffee as part of a delivery mission. We anticipated that people in general would help the robot, dependent upon whether they were busy or had received a demonstration of the robot as introduction. Our results indicate that the willingness of bystanders to help a robot not only is a consequence of the robot initiated interaction, but equally depends on the situation and state of occupation people are in when requested to interact with and assist the robot.

  • 17.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    To help or not to help a service robot - Bystander intervention as a resource in human-robot collaboration2006In: Interaction Studies, ISSN 1572-0373, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 455-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobile service robot performing a task for its user(s) might not be able to accomplish its mission without help from other people present in the shared environment. In previous research, collaborative control has been studied as an interactive mode of operation with a robot, compensating for its limitations in autonomy. However, few studies of robots requesting assistance by detecting potential collaborators, directing its attention to them, addressing them, and finally obtaining help from them, have previously been performed in real-world use contexts. This study focuses on a fetch-and-carry robot, Cero, which has been designed to operate in an office environment as an aid for motion-impaired users. During its missions, the robot sometimes needs help with loading or unloading an object. The main question for the study was: under what conditions are people willing to help when requested to do so by the robot? We were particularly interested in bystanders, i.e. people who happened to be in the environment but who did not have any official business with the robot (they neither knew anything about the robot, nor did they have access rights to the robot or its functions). To answer these questions and to provide a better understanding of human-robot help-seeking situations, we conducted an experimental study in which subjects who had not encountered our service robot before were requested to assist it with a task. The results of the study confirm that bystanders can to some degree be expected to help in robot missions, but that their willingness to help the robot depends on the situation and state of occupation that people are in when requested to interact with and assist the robot.

  • 18.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Severinson Eklundh,, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Green, Anders
    Topp, Elin A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Christensen, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    What's in the gap?: Interaction Transitions that make the HRI work2006In: Proceedings of the 15th IEEE international symposium on robot and human interactive communication, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis from a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) study on spatial positioning and interaction episode transitions. Subjects showed a living room to a robot to teach it new places and objects. This joint task was analyzed with respect to organizing strategies for interaction episodes. Noticing the importance of transitions between interaction episodes, small adaptive movements in posturewere observed. This finding needs to be incorporated into HRI modules that plan and execute robots’ spatial behavior in interaction, e.g., through dynamic adaptation of spatial formations and distances depending on interaction episode.

  • 19.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Tate, M.
    Böcker, M.
    Orr, R.
    Petersen, F.
    Standardising SPOKEN commands for mobile devices and services2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    reaching a level of maturity that suggests sophisticated voicebased user-interface technologies will soon be available in mobile devices. As voice commands for mobile devices and services have so far been primarily limited to voice dialling and the activation of individual menu items, there is currently a window of opportunity to standardise voice commands for basic functions of mobile devices and services. ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, has formed a Specialist Task Force (STF) to extend the existing ETSI standard ES 202 076 on voice commands for mobile services and devices. The existing published standard covers five major European languages, whereas the revised version will extend the number of languages covered to 30. This paper gives an overview of the commands and languages covered, and outlines the approach used to identify the voice commands (elicitation, validation and phonetic discrimination).

  • 20.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Topp, Elin Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    The Art of Gate-Crashing Bringing HRI into users' homes2009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special purpose service robots have already entered the market and their users homes. Also the idea of the general purpose service robot or personal robot companion is increasingly discussed and investigated. To probe human-robot interaction with a mobile robot in arbitrary domestic settings, we conducted a study in eight different homes. Based on previous results from laboratory studies we identified particular interaction situations which should be studied thoroughly in real home settings. Based upon the collected sensory data from the robot we found that the different environments influenced the spatial management observable during our subjects' interaction with the robot. We also validated empirically that the concept of spatial prompting can aid spatial management and communication, and assume this concept to be helpful for Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) design. In this article we report on our exploratory field study and our findings regarding, in particular, the spatial management observed during show episodes and movement through narrow passages.

  • 21. Kaindl, H.
    et al.
    Ertl, D.
    Falb, J.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Göller, M.
    Multimodal communication involving 2D-space movement2010In: 4th International Conference on Cognitive Systems, CogSys 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Kaindl, H.
    et al.
    Putz, B.
    Ertl, D.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    A Walking Aid Integrated in a Semi-Autonomous Robot Shopping Cart2011In: ThinkMind: ACHI 2011, The Fourth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions / [ed] Les Miller, Silvana Roncagliolo, 2011, p. 218-221Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Challenged and/or elderly people experiencing limited mobility impairment may want to get support for walking. In public, e.g., in a supermarket, they may want to get this support without it being immediately visible. Therefore, we integrated walking aid functionality into a robot shopping cart. It can support a customer to lean on the cart while the walking pace is controlled to follow a user-determined setting. More precisely, the user of the cart can get walking assistance by holding specifically designed handle bars supporting both arms. This construction is fully integrated in a prototypical robot designed as a shopping cart.

  • 23. Lohse, M.
    et al.
    Hanheide, M.
    Wrede, B.
    Walters, M.L.
    Koay, K.L.
    Syrdal, D.S.
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Dautenhahn, K.
    Sagerer, G.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Evaluating extrovert and introvert behaviour of a domestic robot – a video study2008In: Proceedings of the 17th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN, 2008, p. 488-493Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) research is here presented into social robots that have to be able to interact with inexperienced users. In the design of these robots many research findings of human-human interaction and human-computer interaction are adopted but the direct applicability of these theories is limited because a robot is different from both humans and computers. Therefore, new methods have to be developed in HRI in order to build robots that are suitable for inexperienced users. In this paper we present a video study we conducted employing our robot BIRON (BIelefeld RObot companioN) which is designed for use in domestic environments. Subjects watched the system during the interaction with a human and rated two different robot behaviours (extrovert and introvert). The behaviours differed regarding verbal output and person following of the robot. Aiming to improve human-robot interaction, participants' ratings of the behaviours were evaluated and compared.

  • 24. Pluke, M.
    et al.
    Böcker, M.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Rodriguez-Ascaso, A.
    Schneider, M.
    Zetterström, E.
    Inclusive innovative services: Planning today to avoid future failure2010In: 2010 International Conference on Information Society, i-Society 2010, 2010, p. 429-434Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have the potential to enhance the lives of most users. However, new user interaction technologies are often introduced without taking into account the requirements of elderly and/or disabled users, resulting in products and services that are hardly usable by those users. ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, has established a Specialist Task Force (STF) 377 which is developing a roadmap of forthcoming user-interaction technologies with a scope of ten years and which aims to identify relevant user requirements from an accessibility viewpoint as well as corresponding usability solutions. The results of investigations using this method allow stakeholders in different stages of the research and development lifecycle of e-Services to identify and avoid potential difficulties in the design of user interfaces which could cause elderly or disabled users to experience usability issues.

  • 25. Rodriguez-Ascaso, A.
    et al.
    Zetterström, E.
    Böcker, M.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Pluke, M.
    Schneider, M.
    Inclusive E-services for all: Identifying accessibility requirements for upcoming interaction technologies2010In: Computers Helping People with Special Needs: 12th International Conference, ICCHP 2010, Vienna, Austria, July 14-16, 2010. Proceedings, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, p. 135-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have the potential of facilitating the lives of citizens. However, experience consistently shows that user-interface innovations for consumer products are being researched and developed without taking into account the needs of people with disabilities. This situation is not helped by the fact that product and service developers can be unaware of the requirements of customers with impairments and therefore lack the insight into appropriate design solutions that may not be very demanding in terms of R&D and production costs. ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, has established a Specialist Task Force (STF) 377 on "Inclusive eServices for all: Optimizing the accessibility and use of upcoming user interaction technology". The aim of this working group is to systematically evaluate ongoing and forthcoming interaction technologies to sketch a 10-year roadmap of foreseen technological enablers.

  • 26.
    Räsänen, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Report on User and Stakeholder Requirements: CommRob Project : Deliverable D7.12008Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Green, A.
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Social and collaborative aspects of interaction with a service robot2003In: Robotics and Autonomous Systems, ISSN 0921-8890, E-ISSN 1872-793X, Vol. 42, no 04-mar, p. 223-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To an increasing extent, robots are being designed to become a part of the lives of ordinary people. This calls for new models of the interaction between humans and robots, taking advantage of human social and communicative skills. Furthermore, human-robot relationships must be understood in the context of use of robots, and based on empirical studies of humans and robots in real settings. This paper discusses social aspects of interaction with a service robot, departing from our experiences of designing a fetch-and-carry robot for motion-impaired users in an office environment. We present the motivations behind the design of the Cero robot, especially its communication paradigm. Finally, we discuss experiences from a recent usage study, and research issues emerging from this work. A conclusion is that addressing only the primary user in service robotics is unsatisfactory, and that the focus should be on the setting, activities and social interactions of the group of people where the robot is to be used.

  • 28. Spexard, T.
    et al.
    Li, S.
    Wrede, B.
    Hanheide, M.
    Topp, Elin Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Interaction awareness for joint environment exploration2007In: 2007 RO-MAN: The 16th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human interactive Communication, IEEE , 2007, p. 546-551Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important goal for research on service robots is the cooperation of a human and a robot as team. A service robot in a domestic environment needs to build a representation of its future workspace that corresponds to the human user's understanding of these surroundings. But it also needs to apply this model about the "where" and "what" in its current interaction to allow communication about objects and places in a human-adequate way. In this paper we present the integration of a hierarchical robotic mapping system into an interactive framework controlled by a dialog system. The goal is to use interactively acquired environment models to implement a robot with interaction aware behaviors. A major contribution of this work is a three-level hierarchy of spatial representation affecting three different communication dimensions. This hierarchy is consequently applied in the design of the grounding-based dialog, laser-based topological mapping, and an objects attention system. We demonstrate the benefits of this integration for learning and tour guiding in a human-comprehensible interaction between a robot and its user in a home-tour scenario. The enhanced interaction capabilities are crucial for developing a new generation of robots that will be accepted not only as service robots but also as robot companions.

  • 29.
    Topp, Elin A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Huettenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Christensen, Henrik I.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinson
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Bringing together human and robotic environment representations - A pilot study2006In: 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Vols 1-12, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2006, p. 4946-4952Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human interaction with a service robot requires a shared representation of the environment for spoken dialogue and task specification where names used for particular locations are depending on personal preferences. A question is how such human oriented models can be tied to the geometric robotic models needed for precise localisation and navigation. We assume that this integration can be based on the information potential users give to a service robot about its working environment. We further believe that this information is best given in an interactive setting (a "guided tour") in this particular environment. This paper presents a pilot study that investigates how humans present a familiar environment to a mobile robot. The study is set up within our concept of Human Augmented Mapping, for which we assume an initial "guided tour" scenario to teach a robot its environment. Results from this pilot study are used to validate a proposed generic environment model for a service robot.

  • 30.
    Topp, Elin Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Hütenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Christensen, Henrik Iskov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinson
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Acquiring a shared environment representation2006In: HRI Proc. ACM Conf. Human-Robot Interact., 2006, p. 361-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interacting with a domestic service robot implies the existence of a joint environment model for a user and a robot. We present a pilot study that investigates, how humans present a familiar environment to a mobile robot. Results from this study are used to evaluate a generic environment model for a service robot that can be personalised by interaction.

1 - 30 of 30
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