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  • 1.
    Eitel-Amor, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Flores, O.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers2014In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 506, no 1, p. 012008-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work addresses the question whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence and which role they play during transition. First, the parent-offspring mechanism is investigated in temporal simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to turbulent channels and boundary layers up to Re-tau = 590. Using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations, the effect of a turbulent background is also considered. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are created shortly after initialization. Thereafter, all rotational structures decay, whereas this effect is enforced in the presence of an eddy viscosity. In a second approach, a laminar boundary layer is tripped to transition by insertion of a regular pattern of hairpins by means of defined volumetric forces representing an ejection event. The idea is to create a synthetic turbulent boundary layer dominated by hairpin-like vortices. The flow for Re-tau < 250 is analysed with respect to the lifetime of individual hairpin-like vortices. Both the temporal and spatial simulations demonstrate that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background has formed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former DNS studies is an outer layer phenomenon not being connected to the onset of near-wall turbulence.

  • 2.
    Eitel-Amor, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Simulation and validation of a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer up to Reθ = 83002014In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, ISSN 0142-727X, E-ISSN 1879-2278, Vol. 47, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of a finely resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of a spatially developing zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer up to a Reynolds number of Reθ = 8300 are presented. The very long computational domain provides substantial assessment for suggested high Reynolds number (Re) trends. Statistics, integral quantities and spectral data are validated using high quality direct numerical simulation (DNS) ranging up to Reθ = 4300 and hot-wire measurements covering the remaining Re-range. The mean velocity, turbulent fluctuations, skin friction, and shape factor show excellent agreement with the reference data. Through utilisation of filtered DNS, subtle differences between the LES and DNS could to a large extent be explained by the reduced spanwise resolution of the LES. Spectra and correlations for the streamwise velocity and the wall-shear stress evidence a clear scale-separation and a footprint of large outer scales on the near-wall small scales. While the inner peak decreases in importance and reduces to 4% of the total energy at the end of the domain, the energy of the outer peak scales in outer units. In the near-wall region a clear k - 1 region emerges. Consideration of the two-dimensional spectra in time and spanwise space reveals that an outer time scale λt ≈ 10δ99 / U∞, with the boundary layer thickness δ99 and free-stream velocity U∞, is the correct scale throughout the boundary layer rather than the transformed streamwise wavelength multiplied by a (scale independent) convection velocity. Maps for the covariance of small scale energy and large scale motions exhibit a stronger linear Re dependence for the amplitude of the off-diagonal peak compared to the diagonal one, thereby indicating that the strength of the amplitude modulation can only qualitatively be assessed through the diagonal peak. In addition, the magnitude of the wall-pressure fluctuations confirms mixed scaling, and pressure spectra at the highest Re give a first indication of a -7/3 wave number dependence. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  • 3.
    Eitel-Amor, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Flores, O.
    Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers2015In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 27, no 2, article id 025108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work presents a number of parallel and spatially developing simulations of boundary layers to address the question of whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence, and which role they play during transition. In the first part, the parent-offspring regeneration mechanism is investigated in parallel (temporal) simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to either turbulent channels or boundary layers (Re-tau less than or similar to 590). The effect of a turbulent background superimposed on the mean flow is considered by using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are only created shortly after initialization, with all rotational structures decaying for later times. For hairpins in a clean (laminar) environment, the decay is relatively slow, while hairpins in weak turbulent environments (10% of nu(t)) dissipate after a couple of eddy turnover times. In the second part, the role of hairpin vortices in laminar-turbulent transition is studied using simulations of spatial boundary layers tripped by hairpin vortices. These vortices are generated by means of specific volumetric forces representing an ejection event, creating a synthetic turbulent boundary layer initially dominated by hairpin-like vortices. These hairpins are advected towards the wake region of the boundary layer, while a sinusoidal instability of the streaks near the wall results in rapid development of a turbulent boundary layer. For Re-theta > 400, the boundary layer is fully developed, with no evidence of hairpin vortices reaching into the wall region. The results from both the parallel and spatial simulations strongly suggest that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background is developed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former direct numerical simulation studies is reminiscent of the transitional boundary layer and may not be connected to some aspects of the dynamics of the fully developed wall-bounded turbulence.

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