Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Elenius, Kjell
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Hellmer, Kahl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Project presentation: Spontal: multimodal database of spontaneous dialog2009In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2009: The XXIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference / [ed] Peter Branderud, Hartmut Traunmüller, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2009, p. 190-193Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the ongoing Swedish speech database project Spontal: Multimodal database of spontaneous speech in dialog (VR 2006-7482). The project takes as its point of departure the fact that both vocal signals and gesture involving the face and body are important in every-day, face-to-face communicative interaction, and that there is a great need for data with which we more precisely measure these.

  • 2.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Elenius, Kjell
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Hellmer, Kahl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Spontal: a Swedish spontaneous dialogue corpus of audio, video and motion capture2010In: Proc. of the Seventh conference on International Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10) / [ed] Calzolari, Nicoletta; Choukri, Khalid; Maegaard, Bente; Mariani, Joseph; Odjik, Jan; Piperidis, Stelios; Rosner, Mike; Tapias, Daniel, 2010, p. 2992-2995Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the Spontal database of spontaneous Swedish dialogues. 120 dialogues of at least 30 minutes each have been captured in high-quality audio, high-resolution video and with a motion capture system. The corpus is currently being processed and annotated, and will be made available for research at the end of the project.

  • 3.
    House, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Self-voice identification in children with phonological impairment2011In: Proceedings of the ICPhS XVII, Hong Kong, 2011, p. 886-889Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report preliminary data from a study of self-voice identification in children with phonological impairment (PI), where results from 13 children with PI are compared to results from a group of children with typical speech. No difference between the two groups was found, suggesting that a phonological impairment does not affect children’s ability to recognize their recorded voices as their own. We conclude that children with PI indeed recognize their own recorded voice and that the use of recordings in therapy can be supported.

  • 4.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Children’s perception of their modified speech – preliminary findings2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011, 2011, p. 117-120Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes an ongoing investigation of 4-6 year-old children’s perception of synthetically modified versions of their own recorded speech. Recordings of the children’s speech production are automatically modified so that the initial consonant is replaced by a different consonant. The task for the children is to judge the phonological accuracy (correct vs. incorrect) and the speaker identity (me vs. someone else) of each stimulus. Preliminary results indicate that children with typical speech generally judge phonological accuracy correctly, ofboth original recordings and synthetically modified recordings. As a first evaluation of the re-synthesis technique with child users, the results are promising,as the children generally accept the intended phonological form, seemingly without detecting the modification.

  • 5.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Children’s recognition of their own voice: influence of phonological impairment2011In: INTERSPEECH 2011, 12th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association,, 2011, p. 2205-2208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the ability to identify the recorded voice as one’s own, in three groups of children: one group of children with phonological impairment (PI) and two groups of children with typical speech and language development; 4-5 year-olds and 7-8 year-olds. High average performance rates in all three groups suggest that these children indeed recognize their recorded voice as their own, with no significant difference between the groups. Signs indicating that children with deviant speech use their speech deviance as a cue to identifying theirown voice are discussed.

  • 6.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Corrective re-synthesis of deviant speech using unit selection2011In: Proceedings of the 18th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: Nodalida 2011 / [ed] Sandford Pedersen, B.; Nespore, G.; Skadina, I., 2011, p. 214-217Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a novel approach to modified re-synthesis, by concatenation of speech from different speakers. The system removes an initial voiceless plosive from one utterance, recorded from a child, and replaces it with another voiceless plosive selected from a database of recordings of other child speakers. Preliminary results from a listener evaluation are reported.

  • 7.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Development of self-voice recognition in children2009In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2009, 2009, p. 136-139Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to recognize the recorded voice as one’s own was explored in two groups of children, one aged 4-5 and the other aged 7-8. The task for the children was to identify which one of four voice samples represented their own voice. The results indicate that 4 to 5 year-old children perform as well as 7 to 8 year-old children when identifying their own recorded voice. Moreover, a time span of 1-2 weeks between recording and identification does not affect the younger children’s performance, while the older children perform significantly worse after this time span. Implications for the use of recordings in speech and language therapy are discussed.

  • 8.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Interactional patterns in computer-assisted phonological intervention in children2007In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2007, 2007, p. 69-72Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is interaction during speech and language intervention in children with phonological impairment. Interactional patterns between children and therapists in two different settings are compared; on the one hand ‘tabletop’ phonological intervention and, on the other hand, computer-assisted phonological intervention. The interactions are compared in terms of interactional dominance and coherence. This paper describes work in progress. Background and method will be presented here, but at the time of writing analyses are still ongoing. Preliminary results will be presented at the conference.

  • 9.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Modified re-synthesis of initial voiceless plosives by concatenation of speech from different speakers2009In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2009, 2009, p. 198-2001Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a method of re-synthesising utterance-initial voiceless plosives, given an original utterance by one speaker and a speech database of utterances by many other speakers. The system removes an initial voiceless plosive from an utterance and replaces it with another voiceless plosive selected from the speech database. (For example, if the original utterance was /tat/, the re-synthesised utterance could be /k+at/.) In the method described, techniques used in general concatenative speech synthesis were applied in order to find those segments in the speech database that would yield the smoothest concatenation with the original segment. Results from a small listening test reveal that the concatenated samples are most often correctly identified, but that there is room for improvement on naturalness. Some routes to improvement are suggested.

  • 10.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Segmental re-synthesis of child speech using unit selection2011In: Proceedings of the ICPhS XVII, 2011, p. 1910-1913Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a novel approach to segmental re-synthesis of child speech, by concatenation of speech from different speakers. The re-synthesis builds upon standard methods of unit selection, but instead of using speech from only one speaker, target segments are selected from a speech database of many child speakers. Results from a listener evaluation suggest that the method can be used to generate intelligible speech that is difficult to distinguish from original recordings.

  • 11.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Self-voice recognition in 4 to 5-year-old children2009In: INTERSPEECH 2009: 10TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2009, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2009, p. 820-823Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's ability to recognize their own recorded voice as their own was explored in a group of 4 to 5-year-old children. The task for the children was to identify which one of four voice samples represented their own voice. The results reveal that children perform well above chance level, and that a time span of 1-2 weeks between the recording and the identification does not affect the children's performance. F0 similarity between the participant's recordings and the reference recordings correlated with a higher error-rate. Implications for the use of recordings in speech and language therapy are discussed.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf