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  • 1.
    Abellan-Flos, Marta
    et al.
    Univ Namur, Dept Chim, Lab Chim Bioorgan, Rue Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur, Belgium.;PSL Univ, CNRS, ESPCI Paris, Mol Macromol Chem & Mat, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Altun, Samuel
    Attana AB, Bjornnasvagen 21, S-11419 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Attana AB, Bjornnasvagen 21, S-11419 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vincent, Stephane P.
    Univ Namur, Dept Chim, Lab Chim Bioorgan, Rue Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur, Belgium..
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. Univ Massachusetts, Dept Chem, One Univ Ave, Lowell, MA 01854 USA.;Linnaeus Univ, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, SE-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    QCM sensing of multivalent interactions between lectins and well-defined glycosylated nanoplatforms2019In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 139, article id 111328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methodology has been adopted to unravel important factors contributing to the "cluster glycoside effect" observed in carbohydrate-lectin interactions. Well-defined, glycosylated nanostructures of precise sizes, geometries and functionalization patterns were designed and synthesized, and applied to analysis of the interaction kinetics and thermodynamics with immobilized lectins. The nanostructures were based on Borromean rings, dodecaamine cages, and fullerenes, each of which carrying a defined number of carbohydrate ligands at precise locations. The synthesis of the Borromeates and dodecaamine cages was easily adjustable due to the modular assembly of the structures, resulting in variations in presentation mode. The binding properties of the glycosylated nanoplatforms were evaluated using flow-through QCM technology, as well as hemagglutination inhibition assays, and compared with dodecaglycosylated fullerenes and a monovalent reference. With the QCM setup, the association and dissociation rate constants and the associated equilibrium constants of the interactions could be estimated, and the results used to delineate the multivalency effects of the lectin-nanostructure interactions.

  • 2.
    Borg, Tessie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Somfai, Peter
    Diastereoselective formation of 2,3,4,5-tetrasubstituted tetrahydrofurans by a Lewis acid promoted addition of C3-substituted 1,3-bis(silyl)propenes to aldehydes2013In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 54, no 30, p. 3916-3918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mild, efficient, Lewis acid promoted addition of C3-substituted 1,3-bis(silyl)propenes to aldehydes to provide the corresponding 2,3,4,5-tetrasubstituted tetrahydrofurans in excellent stereoselectivity is reported.

  • 3.
    Borg, Tessie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Somfai, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Diastereoselective formation of 2,3,4,5-tetrasubstituted tetrahydrofurans by a Lewis acid promoted addition of C3-substituted 1,3-bis(silyl)propenes to aldehydes2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Daniel, Quentin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Duan, Lele
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Luo, Xiaodan
    Peking Univ, Coll Chem & Mol Engn, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Ambre, Ram
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Wang, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Zhang, Biaobiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Zhang, Peili
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Wang, Lei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Li, Fusheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Sun, Junliang
    Peking Univ, Coll Chem & Mol Engn, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Ahlquist, Mårten S. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Water Oxidation Initiated by In Situ Dimerization of the Molecular Ru(pdc) Catalyst2018In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 4375-4382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mononuclear ruthenium complex [Ru(pdc)L-3] (H(2)pdc = 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, L = N-heterocycles such as 4-picoline) has previously shown promising catalytic efficiency toward water oxidation, both in homogeneous solutions and anchored on electrode surfaces. However, the detailed water oxidation mechanism catalyzed by this type of complex has remained unclear. In order to deepen understanding of this type of catalyst, in the present study, [Ru(pdc)(py)(3)] (py = pyridine) has been synthesized, and the detailed catalytic mechanism has been studied by electrochemistry, UV-vis, NMR, MS, and X-ray crystallography. Interestingly, it was found that once having reached the Ru-IV state, this complex promptly formed a stable ruthenium dimer [Ru-III(pdc)(py)(2)-O-Ru-IV(pdc)(py)(2)](+). Further investigations suggested that the present dimer, after one pyridine ligand exchange with water to form [Ru-III(pdc)(py)(2)-O-Ru-IV(pdc)(py)(H2O)](+), was the true active species to catalyze water oxidation in homogeneous solutions.

  • 5.
    Fan, Lizhou
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Peili
    DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ, Inst Artificial Photosynth, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.;DUT, Res Ctr Mol Devices, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Biaobiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ, Inst Artificial Photosynth, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.;DUT, Res Ctr Mol Devices, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    3D Core-Shell NiFeCr Catalyst on a Cu Nanoarray for Water Oxidation: Synergy between Structural and Electronic Modulation2018In: ACS ENERGY LETTERS, ISSN 2380-8195, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 2865-2874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low cost transition metal-based electrocatalysts for water oxidation and understanding their structure-activity relationship are greatly desired for clean and sustainable chemical fuel production. Herein, a core-shell (CS) NiFeCr metal/metal hydroxide catalyst was fabricated on a 3D Cu nanoarray by a simple electrodeposition-activation method. A synergistic promotion effect between electronic structure modulation and nanostructure regulation was presented on a CS-NiFeCr oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst: the 3D nanoarchitecture facilitates the mass transport process, the in situ formed interface metal/metal hydroxide heterojunction accelerates the electron transfer, and the electronic structure modulation by Cr incorporation improves the reaction kinetics. Benefiting from the synergy between structural and electronic modulation, the catalyst shows excellent activity toward water oxidation under alkaline conditions: overpotential of 200 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) current density and Tafel slope of 28 mV/dec. This work opens up a new window for understanding the structure-activity relationship of OER catalysts and encourages new strategies for development of more advanced OER catalysts.

  • 6.
    Guo, Yaxiao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Yao, Zhaoyang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Sheng, Xia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Fan, Lizhou
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. Dalian Univ Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Inst Artificial Photosynth, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Boosting nitrogen reduction reaction by bio-inspired FeMoS containing hybrid electrocatalyst over a wide pH range2019In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 62, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile preparation of bio-inspired and morphology controllable catalytic electrode FeS@MoS2/CFC, featuring a carbon fiber cloth (CFC) covered with FeS dotted MoS2 nanosheets, has been established. Synergy between the CFC as a self-standing conductive substrate and the FeS nanoparticle dotted MoS2 nanosheets with abundant active sites makes the noble-metal-free catalytic electrode FeS@MoS2/CFC highly efficient in nitrogen reduction reaction (NRR), with an ammonia production rate of 8.45 mu g h(-1) cm(-2) and excellent long-term stability at -0.5 V in pH neutral electrolyte. Further electrolysis in acidic and alkaline electrolytes revealed the overall NRR catalytic activity of this electrode over a wide pH range.

  • 7.
    Kravchenko, Oleksandr
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Biedermann, Maurice
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Inge, Ken
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Univ Massachusetts, Dept Chem, Lowell, MA USA..
    Stable CAAC-based complexes in dynamic olefin metathesis2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Schaufelberger, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Resolving a Reactive Organometallic Intermediate from Dynamic Directing Group Systems by Selective C-H ActivationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalyst discovery from systems of potential precursors is a challenging endeavor. Herein, a new strategy applying dynamic chemistry to the identification of catalyst precursors from C-H activation of imines is proposed and evaluated. Using hydroacylation of imines as a model reaction, the selection of an organometallic reactive intermediate from a dynamic imine system, involving many potential directing group/metal entities, is demonstrated. The identity of the amplified reaction intermediate with the best directing group could be resolved in situ via ESI-MS, and coupling of the procedure to an iterative deconvolution protocol generated a system with high screening efficiency.

  • 9.
    Schaufelberger, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Resolving a Reactive Organometallic Intermediate from Dynamic Directing Group Systems by Selective C-H Activation2018In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 101-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalyst discovery from systems of potential precursors is a challenging endeavor. Herein, a new strategy applying dynamic chemistry to the identification of catalyst precursors from C-H activation of imines is proposed and evaluated. Using hydroacylation of imines as a model reaction, the selection of an organometallic reactive intermediate from a dynamic imine system, involving many potential directing group/metal entities, is demonstrated. The identity of the amplified reaction intermediate with the best directing group could be resolved in situ by ESI-MS, and coupling of the procedure to an iterative deconvolution protocol generated a system with high screening efficiency.

  • 10.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Flos, Marta Abellan
    Vincent, Stephane
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Well-defined 3D carbohydrate nanoplatforms: Synthesis, characterization, and lectin interaction2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 248Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Timmer, Brian J.J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Metals in Dynamic Chemistry: Selection & Catalysis2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the adaptation to the oxidative environment on earth, metals played a crucial role for the evolution of life. The presence of metals also allowed access to advanced functions due to their unique coordination sphere and reactivity. This thesis focused on exploiting these unique properties for further development of the field of dynamic chemistry – a field in which adaptation plays a central role as well.

    The first part of the thesis aimed to create a better understanding of multivalent effects in carbohydrate-lectin interactions. By reversible ligand coordination to zinc ions one of the nanoplatforms, the Borromean rings, could be selectively obtained. After carbohydrate functionalization the binding events were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance technology and compared to glycosylated fullerenes and dodecaamide cages. Overall, this investigation indicated that statistical and polyelectrolyte effects play a considerable role in the observed multivalent effects.

    The second part of the thesis aimed to design and synthesize a new catalyst for application in aqueous olefin metathesis. This afforded a ruthenium based catalyst that was applied in the self- and cross-metathesis of highly functionalized substrates, such as carbohydrates. In addition, it was shown that addition of a small amount of acetic acid prevented undesired double bond isomerization.

    The last part of the thesis aimed to explore new methods to discover transition metal catalysts. Dynamic exchange of directing groups generated a pool of potential substrates for C-H activation. Combining this pool of substrates with a pool of potential catalysts resulted in amplification of a reactive substrate/metal combination. By iterative deconvolution in combination with mass spectrometry, this “intermediate” could be identified from the mixture, proving applicability of this alternative approach to catalyst discovery.

  • 12.
    Timmer, Brian J.J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Flos, M. Abellan
    Jorgensen, L. Monster
    Proverbio, D.
    Altun, S.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Aastrup, T.
    Vincent, S. P.
    Spatially well-defined carbohydrate nanoplatforms: synthesis, characterization and lectin interaction study2016In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 52, no 83, p. 12326-12329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two novel dodecasubstituted carbohydrate nanoplatforms based on molecular Borromean rings and dodecaamine cages have been prepared for use in evaluating the importance of the spatial distribution of carbohydrates in their interaction with lectins. The binding affinities of the glyconanoplatforms were characterized using quartz crystal microbalance technology and compared with a monovalent reference and dodecaglycosylated fullerenes.

  • 13.
    Timmer, Brian J.J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Flos, M. Abellán
    Altun, Samuel
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Vincent, Stéphane
    Key Factors for Multivalency Effects in Carbohydrate Nanoplatform-Lectin InteractionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Timmer, Brian J.J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kravchenko, Oleksandr
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Cross Metathesis of Highly Functionalized Substrates in Aqueous MediaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Timmer, Brian J.J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Acid-Assisted Direct Olefin Metathesis of Unprotected Carbohydrates in WaterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Timmer, Brian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Schaufelberger, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Hammarberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Franzen, Johan.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Simple and Effective Integration of Green Chemistry and Sustainability Education into an Existing Organic Chemistry Course2018In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 95, no 8, p. 1301-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green chemistry and sustainable development have become increasingly important topics for the education of future chemists. The cross-disciplinary nature of green chemistry and sustainable development often means these subjects are taught in conjunction with other subjects, such as organic chemistry and chemical engineering. Herein, a straightforward and efficient approach for vertical integration of green chemistry concepts within existing undergraduate organic chemistry courses is shown. The gradual self-evaluation, "greenification", and reassessment of an organic chemistry course at KTH Royal Institute of Technology from 2013 to 2017 is described, with particular focus on the laboratory course and a novel green chemistry project designed to promote sustainability thinking and reasoning. The laboratory project, which can also be conducted as an independent organic chemistry laboratory exercise, required students to critically evaluate variations of the same Pechmann condensation experiment according to the twelve principles of green chemistry. The course evaluation shows that, after the modifications, students feel more comfortable with the topics "green chemistry" and "sustainability" and consider these topics more important for their future careers. Furthermore, the ability of students to discuss and critically evaluate green chemistry parameters improved considerably as determined from the laboratory project reports.

  • 17.
    Zhang, Peili
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, China.
    Sheng, Xia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, China.
    Chen, Xiaoyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Fang, Zhiyong
    Jiang, Jian
    Wang, Mei
    Li, Fusheng
    Fan, Lizhou
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Ren, Yansong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Biaobiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian J. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Ahlquist, Mårten S. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, China.
    Paired Electrocatalytic Oxygenation and Hydrogenation of Organic Substrates with Water as the Oxygen and Hydrogen Source2019In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 58, no 27, p. 9155-9159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of water as an oxygen and hydrogen source for the paired oxygenation and hydrogenation of organic substrates to produce valuable chemicals is of utmost importance as a means of establishing green chemical syntheses. Inspired by the active Ni3+ intermediates involved in electro-catalytic water oxidation by nickel-based materials, we prepared NiBx as a catalyst and used water as the oxygen source for the oxygenation of various organic compounds. NiBx was further employed as both an anode and a cathode in a paired electrosynthesis cell for the respective oxygenation and hydrogenation of organic compounds, with water as both the oxygen and hydrogen source. Conversion efficiency and selectivity of >= 99% were observed during the oxygenation of 5-hydroxy-methylfurfural to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and the simultaneous hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol. This paired electrosynthesis cell has also been coupled to a solar cell as a stand-alone reactor in response to sunlight.

1 - 17 of 17
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