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  • 1.
    Etemady Qeshmy, Danial
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Makdisi, Jacob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ribeiro da Silva, Elias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Pontifical Catholic Univeristy of Parana, Imaculada Conceição, 1155, 80215-901, Curitiba, Brazil.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Grevgatan 34, SE-10215, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Managing Human Errors: Augmented Reality systems as a tool in the quality journey2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 28, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry is shifting, entering a new era with smart and connected devices. The fourth industrial revolution is promising increased growth and productivity by the Smart Factory and within the enabling technologies is Augmented Reality (AR). At the same time as the technology is introduced, errors in manufacturing are a problem which is affecting the productivity and the quality. This research aims to find the main causes of human errors in assembly lines and thereafter explores whether augmented reality is an appropriate tool to be used in order to address those issues. Based on a literature review that identified and characterized a preliminary set of root causes for human errors in assembly lines, these causes were empirically studied in an exercise that covered an in-depth case study in a multinational automotive company. Data in form of interviews and deviation- reports have been used to identify the causing factors and the result showed that the main causes of human errors are the amount of thinking, deciding and searching for information which affected the cognitive load of the operator and in result their performance. Several interviews with experts in augmented reality allowed to verify if AR technology would be feasible to solve or mitigate the found causes. Besides that, in repetitive manual assembly operations, AR is better used showing the process in order to train new operators. At the same time for experienced operators, AR should show information only when an error occurs and when there is a need of taking an active choice. Nevertheless, while theoretically able to managing human error when fully developed, the desired application makes the augmentation of visual objects redundant and increasingly complex for solving the identified causes of errors which questions the appropriateness of using AR systems. Furthermore, the empirical findings showed that for managing human errors, the main bottleneck of an AR system is the systems artificial intelligence capabilities.

  • 2.
    Ribeiro da Silva, Elias
    et al.
    KTH.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Supplier integration through Digital Manufacturing: A SME paradox2018In: Proceedings of the 2nd SC4 Network International Symposium on Supply Chain 4.0. Digital Transformation in SME, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Riberio Da Silva, Elias Hans Dener
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Pontifical Catholic Univeristy of Parana, Imaculada Conceição, 1155, 80215-901, Curitiba, Brazil.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Grevgatan 34, SE-10215, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Pontifical Catholic Univeristy of Parana, Imaculada Conceição, 1155, 80215-901, Curitiba, Brazil ; Federal University of Technology - Parana, Pato Branco, Brazil.
    In pursuit of Digital Manufacturing2019In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies are adopting several new technologies that form the pillars of Industry 4.0 production framework, of which Digital Manufacturing (DM) stands out by combining conventional manufacturing technologies with digital techniques. These are used to assist in the design and analysis of the product and manufacturing processes. The adoption of digital manufacturing is partly about technological change, but it also entails significant organizational issues, which often are overlooked by managers. The purpose of this study is to identify the key factors that enable or prevent DM implementation, considering the production paradigm of Industry 4.0. Based on a literature review that identified a preliminary list of key factors, the appropriateness of these factors is empirically tested and refined in a two-fold approach: an in-depth pilot case in a multinational automotive company that is adopting DM technologies, and a survey of 113 users, managers, implementers and researchers working on digital manufacturing and Industry 4.0. The study identified 24 key factors to be considered when firms implement DM. These are categorized into technical, organizational, project based and external factors. The findings also indicate how each factor should be considered, and that they cannot be generalized due to cultural differences inherent to each individual company. As such, this research contributes to the current research debate by identifying the critical factors to be considered when conceiving and applying models for planning and executing DM implementation.

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