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  • 1.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Assessing Arctic Futures: Voices, Resources, and Governance2013In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 3, no 2, 431-446 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the future of the Arctic is running high, motivated in large part by belief that climate change will open new possibilities (and unleash new threats). Wealth from shipping and natural resource extraction features prominently in narratives about the Arctic in the media, and governance of the region has become a major concern as new actors demand influence. We use three components of current discourse about the Arctic to help reveal connections between how the region is constructed and how the right to decide its future is articulated. Voices are the actors who participate in the discursive construction of Arctic futures, with varying degrees of influence. Resources are objects upon which actors inscribe values, thus locating them in the discourse. Governance refers to the structural features through which action is regulated within spaces, restricting also the range of legitimate actors. We demonstrate the usefulness of these concepts through brief case studies of coal on Spitsbergen, hydrocarbons in the Barents Sea and whaling in the North Atlantic. We conclude by emphasizing the value of a historical perspective to understanding contemporary debates about the future of the Arctic.

  • 2.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Heritage, Conservation, and the Geopolitics of Svalbard: Writing the History of Arctic Environments2017In: Arctic Environmental Modernities: From the age of polar exploration to the era of the anthropocene / [ed] Lill-Ann Körber, Scott MacKenzie, Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan , 2017, 125-143 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industrial Heritage and Arctic Mining Sites: Material Remains as Resources for the Present – and the Future2017In: Heritage and Change in the Arctic: Resources for the Present, and the Future / [ed] Robert C Thomsen and Lill Rastad Bjørst, Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2017, 127-158 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities2016In: TICCIH bulletin / The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, ISSN 1605-6647, Vol. 71, 12- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Why history and industrial heritage matter for Arctic communities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Dodds, Klaus
    et al.
    Hemmings, Alan D.Roberts, PederPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Handbook on the Politics of Antarctica2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Peder, Roberts
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mining landscapes as cultural heritage: lessons from the Nordic Arctic2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Bathyscaphes and Big Science: Oceanography and Exploration 1945-19602012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Danish marine biologist Anton Bruun (1900-1961) returned home in 1952 after the highly successful Galathea expedition, the tradition of exploration that his venture embodied was already passing into history. During the decade that followed oceanographic exploration became associated more with international cooperation -- for logistical as much as political reasons -- while the leadership of the Nordic countries faded as the Cold War became entrenched. This paper pays close attention to the political as well as the scientific and technical reasons for these shifts. I argue that the shifting geopolitical landscape of the 1950s shaped the landscape for oceanography in diverse ways, from framing the possibilities for international cooperation (and competition) to opening new funding avenues. This went far beyond the sphere of narrowly military activities. Although the imperative to survey and control the oceans led to increased funding for physical oceanography, issues such as radioactive waste dumping, food security, and even the basic natural historical interest in locating new species opened space for marine biologists to benefit. Nor did the Cold War’s geopolitical impact end with the superpowers: decolonization changed the dynamics of international cooperation, as did the emergence of new international bodies such as UNESCO. As the 1950s ended and bathyscaphes even replaced ships as the most 'sexy' vehicles for oceanographic exploration, the change since 1945 was clear – even though oceanography remained both practically and rhetorically linked to exploration.

  • 10.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Class and Colonialism in Antarctic Exploration, 1750-19202015In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 47, 117-118 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Devils reproducing Like Rabbits: The Curious History of Penguin Farming in Norway2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses a strange and often forgotten historical episode -- the attempts to transplant Antarctic fauna to Norway and vice versa in the interwar years of last century -- as a way to examine conceptions of environmental flexibility and threat. The quest to introduce penguins to Norway (moving reindeer and possibly other species to the Antarctic) reflected an optimistic belief in the ability of Norwegians to turn even the harshest environments into sources of economic benefit. This belief articulated a more general view of the Antarctic as a space not for conservation, but for exploitation, grounded in the power of humans to beneficially tweak the environment. My principal case study is the ill-fated attempt to introduce penguins to Norway, led by the geologist and Arctic activist Adolf Hoel, who felt certain that penguin meat and penguin eggs could become viable commodities while the penguins flourished in northern Norway. Resistance to the venture came from both humans (who had no appetite for penguin products and regarded the animals as alien), and from the penguins themselves (who refused to conform to the lifestyles expected of them). The failure of the transplantation schemes demonstrated that Hoel’s dream was dashed by both cultural and biological factors, suggesting the value of broader approaches to understanding such incidents of environmental discord.

  • 12.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Exploring Greenland: Cold War Science and Technology on Ice2017In: British Journal for the History of Science, ISSN 0007-0874, E-ISSN 1474-001X, Vol. 50, no 1, 167-168 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Roberts, Peder
    MISHA, France.
    Heroes for the Past and Present: A Century of Remembering Amundsen and Scott2011In: Endeavour, ISSN 0160-9327, E-ISSN 1873-1929, Vol. 35, no 4, 142-150 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1911-1912 Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott led rival parties in a race to the geographic South Pole. While both parties reached the Pole - Amundsen first Scott's men died on the return journey. Amundsen became a Norwegian icon through his record-setting travels; Scott became a symbol of courage and devotion to science. The memory of each was invoked at various points during the twentieth century in the context of contemporary Antarctic events. Scott's status as a scientific figure was central to the Scott Polar Research Institute, while Amundsen's lack of scientific legacy became a way for British polar explorers to differentiate themselves from Norwegian contemporaries during the interwar years. After 1945 Scott and Amundsen were again invoked as exemplars of national polar achievement, even as the rise of large-scale science on the continent overshadowed past British and Norwegian achievements. In the present Amundsen and Scott remain wedded to particular values, focused respectively on national achievement and sacrifice in the name of science, while their race has become secondary.

  • 14.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Intelligence and internationalism: the Cold War career of Anton Bruun2013In: Centaurus, ISSN 0008-8994, E-ISSN 1600-0498, Vol. 55, no 3, 243-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish marine biologist Anton Frederik Bruun (1901–1961) is chiefly remembered as an explorer of the deep-sea fauna and a key figure in international scientific organizations during the 1950s. As the Cold War increasingly permeated the marine sciences and it became too expensive for small states to operate deep-sea research vessels, he became an asset to the USA's oceanographic establishment as it sought to first assess Soviet strength (in terms of research, technology and logistical capacity) and then to build up American oceanography in response. Bruun's contacts with the USSR – including a visit in 1957 – strengthened his contacts to the American military as well as American oceanographers. His enthusiasm for raising interest in the marine sciences in developing countries could also be matched to American geopolitical goals. Bruun's participation in the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Naga expedition to the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand captured the mutually beneficial nature of his American connections. Bruun was able to use the USA to reach distant oceans, while the USA in turn gained from Bruun's prestige as it forged connections with friendly states through science, an increasingly important arena for Cold War competition.

  • 15.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Knowing the Arctic from the Comfort of Cambridge2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Modern Explorers2017In: Handbook on the Politics of Antarctica / [ed] Klaus Dodds, Alan D. Hemmings, Peder Roberts, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, 152-166 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Nordic or national?: post-war visions of polar conflict and cooperation2013In: Science, geopolitics and culture in the polar region: Norden beyond borders / [ed] Sverker Sörlin, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, 55-78 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Manchester .
    Scientists and Sea Ice Under Surveillance in the Early Cold War2014In: The Surveillance Imperative: Geosciences During the Cold War and Beyond / [ed] Simone Turchetti and Peder Roberts, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 125-144 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On February 24, 1958, 85 individuals from the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the Soviet Union gathered in the small town of Easton, Maryland, for a conference on Arctic sea ice.1 Over four days they discussed a range of issues including the characteristics and physical composition of sea ice, its distribution and drift, and issues related to navigation and ice forecasting. Organized by the Earth Sciences Division of the United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS), at the behest of the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the conference was billed as an opportunity for the “productive exchange of facts and ideas.”2 The event reflected the rapid growth of interest in a scientific field with profound implications for military strategy in North America and commerce in the Soviet Union—and the desire for the United States to pick the brains of counterparts from around the world in a field where others almost certainly led, especially in terms of practical experience.

  • 19.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Scientists as Political Actors: Demarcating Arctic Geographies2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea Ice Forecasting and the Renewal of East-West Scientific Connections2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Shipwreck at Cape Flora: The Expeditions of Benjamin Leigh Smith, England's Forgotten Arctic Explorer2015In: British Journal for the History of Science, ISSN 0007-0874, E-ISSN 1474-001X, Vol. 48, no 2, 371-372 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Submarines for Science and Security: bathyscaphes and oceanography in the 19502013In: Book of abstracts, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Circumpolar North: Transnational Environments and Cold War Knowledge2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The European Antarctic: Science and Strategy in Scandinavia and the British Empire2011Book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Expeditions of Gino Watkins: Arctic Travels in a Disenchanted Age2013In: Travels in the North: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Long History of Northern Travel Writing / [ed] Silje Gaupseth, Marie-Theres Federhofer, Per Pippin Aspaas, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag, 2013, 1, 191-208 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Friend who Outstayed his Welcome?: Johan Hjort and the Difficulties of Bringing Science to Bear Upon Whaling2014In: Whaling and History IV / [ed] Jan Erik Ringstad, Sandefjord: Hvalfangstmuseet , 2014, 139-150 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Friend who Outstayed his Welcome?: Johan Hjort and the Norwegian whaling industry2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    “‘The Penguin Is To Be A Norwegian Bird”: Nationalizing and Naturalizing an Alien Animal2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Politics of Early Exploration2017In: Handbook on the Politics of Antarctica / [ed] Klaus Dodds, Alan D. Hemmings, Peder Roberts, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, 318-333 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Visioneers: How a Group of Elite Scientists Pursued Space Colonies, Nanotechnologies, and a Limitless Future.2014In: British Journal for the History of Science, ISSN 0007-0874, E-ISSN 1474-001X, Vol. 47, no 3, 580-581 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The White (Supremacist) Continent: Antarctica and Fantasies of Nazi Survival2016In: Antarctica and the Humanities: A Continent for the Humanities / [ed] Peder Roberts, Lize-Marié van der Watt, Adrian Howkins, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 105-124 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Traditions, Networks and Deep-Sea Expeditions After 19452016In: Expeditions as Experiments: Practising Observation and Documentation / [ed] Ulrike Spring and Marianna Klemun, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 213-234 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the Past of Arctic Futures: Resource Extraction Sites as Heritage2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Dodds, Klaus
    Hemmings, Alan D.
    The Politics of Antarctica2017In: Handbook on the Politics of Antarctica / [ed] Klaus Dodds, Alan D. Hemmings, Peder Roberts, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, 1-17 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Dodds, Klaus
    Royal Holloway University of London.
    Van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    'But Why Do You Go There?': Norway and South Africa in the Antarctic during the 1950s2013In: Science, geopolitics and culture in the polar region: Norden beyond borders / [ed] Sverker Sörlin, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, 79-110 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Howkins, Adrian
    Van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University (Arcum).
    Antarctica: A Continent for the Humanities2016In: Antarctica and the Humanities, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1-23 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    LTU.
    Animals as instruments of Norwegian imperial authority in the interwar Arctic2016In: Journal for the History of Environment and Society, ISSN 2506-6749, Vol. 1, no 1, 65-87 p., 10.1484/J.JHES.5.110829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the first half of the twentieth century a number of individuals in Norway participated in the transfer of animals from both the Arctic to the Antarctic regions and vice versa. These projects may be conceptualized as a form of imperial acclimatization, following in the footsteps of earlier attempts to transplant both plants and animals from their indigenous ranges to new geographic locations for both practical and recreational purposes. Reindeer were introduced to the island of South Georgia before World War I as Norwegian whalers turned a space previously uninhabited by humans into the operational hub of a booming Antarctic whaling industry. The successful transplantation of reindeer was followed by less successful attempts to transfer muskoxen from Greenland to Svalbard and the Scandinavian mainland, penguins from the Antarctic to the coast of Norway, and dreams of transferring fur seals from south to north. We argue that these attempts constituted both practical attempts to “enrich” the fauna of discrete habitats, but also expressions of Norwegian authority over the polar regions at a time when imperial ambitions in both the Arctic and Antarctic had significant traction within Norway. The transplanted animals may thus be conceived as geopolitical instruments – mastery over fauna as being a means of expressing mastery over space.

  • 38.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Paglia, Eric
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Field Stations and the Geopolitics of Nordic Knowledge Production on Svalbard2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Paglia, Eric
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. CRISMART at the Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Science as National Belonging: the Construction of Svalbard as a Norwegian SpaceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how science has been employed to establish, maintain, and contest senses of belonging on Svalbard, an Arctic archipelago administered by Norway since 1925 under an international treaty. The central argument is that the process of constructing Svalbard as a space belonging to Norway has long been intertwined with the processes of describing and representing the archipelago, and that participating in those processes has also permitted other states to articulate their own narratives of belonging— on Svalbard in particular and in the Arctic more generally. The concept of belonging is deployed to capture a sense of legitimate presence and stakeholdership that we do not believe can be adequately captured by the narrow concept of sovereignty. The article explores Norway’s historic and current use of science to validate (and even naturalize) its rule over Svalbard. At the same time, we argue that other states use science on Svalbard to articulate geopolitical scripts that portray them as stakeholders in an Arctic that is of trans-regional relevance due to the teleconnected effects of climate change.

     

  • 40.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Paglia, Eric
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Science as national belonging: The construction of Svalbard as a Norwegian space2016In: Social Studies of Science, ISSN 0306-3127, E-ISSN 1460-3659, Vol. 46, no 6, 894-911 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how science has been employed to establish, maintain, and contest senses of belonging on Svalbard, an Arctic archipelago administered by Norway since 1925 under an international treaty. Our central argument is that the process of constructing Svalbard as a space belonging to Norway has long been intertwined with the processes of describing and representing the archipelago and that participating in those processes has also permitted other states to articulate their own narratives of belonging - on Svalbard in particular and in the Arctic more generally. We deploy the concept of belonging to capture a sense of legitimate presence and stakeholdership that we do not believe can be adequately captured by narrow concepts of sovereignty. Norway's historic and current use of science validates (and even naturalizes) its rule over Svalbard. At the same time, other states use science on Svalbard to articulate geopolitical scripts that portray them as stakeholders in an Arctic that is of transregional relevance due to the effects of climate change.

  • 41.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Turchetti, SimoneUniversity of Manchester.
    The Surveillance Imperative: Geosciences during the Cold War and Beyond2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surveillance is a key notion for understanding power and control in the modern world, but it has been curiously neglected by historians of science and technology. Using the overarching concept of the "surveillance imperative," this collection of essays offers a new window on the evolution of the environmental sciences during and after the Cold War.

  • 42.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department for History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    On past, present and future Arctic expeditions2015In: The New Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen and Oyvind Paasche, Springer International Publishing , 2015, 57-68 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today the term “Arctic expedition” conjures up images of heroic men chasing knowledge, but also personal and national glory. Geographical goals such as the North Pole, the Northwest and Northeast Passages and the discovery of new lands became major cultural touchstones during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Individuals such as Sir John Franklin, Fridtjof Nansen, and Robert E. Peary became household names. Many smaller expeditions also ventured to the Arctic from Eurasia and North America. This chapter is about how large, publicity-friendly expeditions related to smaller, more prosaic ventures, and how the term expedition is used in the present to denote everything from seasonal fieldwork conducted by scientists to one-off feats of travel. We conclude with some reflections on how Arctic expeditions may look in the future – and how the term expedition continues to carry meaning in terms of culture and memory.

  • 43.
    Roberts, Peder
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van der Watt, Lize-MariéPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.Howkins, Adrian
    Antarctica and the Humanities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continent for science is also a continent for the humanities. Despite having no indigenous human population, Antarctica has been imagined in powerful, innovative, and sometimes disturbing ways that reflect politics and culture much further north. Antarctica has become an important source of data for natural scientists working to understand global climate change. As this book shows, the tools of literary studies, history, archaeology, and more, can likewise produce important insights into the nature of the modern world and humanity more broadly.

  • 44. Turchetti, Simone
    et al.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Knowing the Enemy, Knowing the Earth2014In: The Surveillance Imperative: Geosciences During the Cold War and Beyond / [ed] Simone Turchetti and Peder Roberts, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 1-19 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surveillance is a subject on many lips. Thanks to Edward Snowden’s revelations, commentators around the world have questioned if anything remains undetected by the surveillance networks set up by the world’s most powerful nations. Documentation leaked by the former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) contractor has revealed electronic ears and eyes spreading across the planet, enabling the rapid transfer of massive amounts of data to an army of intelligence operators, aided by some of the fastest computing machines on earth and their capacious hard drives. While emblematic examples such as German chancellor Angela Merkel’s tapped Nokia handset evoke the gadget-oriented espionage of an early 007 movie, the sheer scale and sweep of the operations have caused the greatest concern for most members of the public. Not only has it become apparent how much private information transferred through mobile phones, e-mails, Web portals, and social networking websites can be tapped into by security agencies, but we now also know that intelligence operators do not always discriminate between enemies and allies in tapping operations—something that has come to light in the most embarrassing circumstances for the Obama administration.1

  • 45.
    Wormbs, Nina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Lajus, Julia
    Nilsson E, Annika
    How to be Policy-Relevant: The History of Technology and the Future of the Arctic2012Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 45 of 45
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