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  • 1.
    Bhale, Vilas
    et al.
    Department of Agronomy, Dr. PDKV, Akola-444 101 (MS), India.
    Tupe, Arvind
    Department of Agronomy, Dr. PDKV, Akola-444 101 (MS), India.
    Karmore, Jayashri
    Department of Agronomy, Dr. PDKV, Akola-444 101 (MS), India.
    Kale, Manoj
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Crop planning in relation to climate change in rain fed regions2012In: Journal of Agricultural Technology, ISSN 1686-9141, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 443-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty and variability of rains both space and time is the major constraints affecting agricultural production in rain fed farming. Scientific study on the quantum and distribution of rainfall would enable to farming community and researcher to adjust or modify the cropping pattern as well as the cultural operation to utilize the actual moisture available in the field for profitable crop production. The daily rainfall data for last 39 year were analyzed to study its variability and probability. In rain fed farming rainfall is the primary and most important factor affecting productivity and it is mostly uncertain and erratic. Thus, the change in the rainfall pattern and amount suggests adjusting or modifying the cropping pattern and cultural practices of agricultural crops in the region for achieving the sustainable productivity. Under short break of monsoon, repeated hoeing to prevent soil moisture loss and under long dry spell, agronomic management like mulching, relay cropping or re-sowing are advocated.

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    Bhale and Manoj Kale
  • 2.
    Kale, Manoj Ashokrao
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bird Species in Urban and Agricultural Landscapes: Bird diversity patterns along an urbanisation gradient and crop damage caused by birds on the Deccan Plateau, India2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The major human activities that have transformed the Earth include agriculture and urbanization. The present study was conducted to contribute to a description of the effect on birds of urbanization and agriculture in an Indian region. Terrestrial bird assemblages were censused along a five-stage urbanisation gradient between January and April 2010-2013 near the city of Amravati, on the Deccan Plateau, Central India. Altogether, 89 species of birds were recorded, with the highest species richness in the rural areas (67 species) and lowest in the urban stage (29 species). The assemblages were significantly nested in all the five stages. Maximum cumulative species abundance (12 399 individuals over four years) was found in the urban stage, and was due to the constant presence of large groups of Rose-ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri). The lowest bird abundance was found in the industrial zone (4837 in total), where there was also a nearly two-fold decrease from 2010 to 2013. Thirty-six species demonstrated significant variation in their densities at least in one stage and between at least two months (p<0.05). Densities of 13.9% (n=5) of those species varied significantly in two stages, that of Copsychus saularis in three stages, and of Phoenicurus ochruros, in all five stages. Urban, suburban, periurban and forest stages were characterised by relatively stable species densities (significant changes observed only for 17.2% (n=5), 17.1% (n=6), 12.9% (n=7), and 17.8% (n=16) species, respectively). The additive diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall diversity (gamma-diversity), alpha diversity (within transects located within one stage) contributed 50.1% to the total diversity, and the controbution of within-stage variability was small (2.7%). Additionally, censuses on cultivated fields were taken. In two areas under mixed cropping systems, 53 bird species were identified in the two years period between June and December, 2011 and 2012. Out of the 53 detected species, only 14 were common (recorded at ≥50% of visits). Twenty-one species were recorded at Zadgaon in crops of tur (Cajanus cajan), cotton (Gossypium arboreum) and soybean (Glycine max). Nineteen species were recorded at Bhankhed in jawar (Sorghum bicolor), cotton and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus). At Zadgaon, territorial activity was observed in four species: the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus), Jungle Babbler (Turdoides striata), Yellow-eyed Babbler (Chrysomma sinense) and Red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus). The study indicated that four bird species were found under high risk, thirteen species at medium risk and eight species at low risk due to pesticide applications in croplands. The extent of crop damage in fields of groundnut, pearl millet, peas, sorghum, and sunflower was assessed by doing actual field censuses. The sustainable solution for reducing crop damage is a need for the farmers and such techniques will help to avoid direct or indirect effects of use of lethal bird control techniques on bird species diversity.

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    PhD Thesis_Manoj Ashokrao Kale
  • 3.
    Kale, Manoj Ashokrao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Bombay Nat Hist Soc, Hornbill House,Shaheed Bhagat Singh Rd, Bombay 400001, Maharashtra, India..
    Ferrante, Marco
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Agroecol, Flakkebjerg Res Ctr, Forsogsvej 1, DK-4200 Slagelse, Denmark..
    Ivanova, Tatiana
    ICPO Biologists Nat Conservat, 24 Line VO 3-7, St Petersburg 199106, Russia..
    Kasambe, Raju
    Bombay Nat Hist Soc, Hornbill House,Shaheed Bhagat Singh Rd, Bombay 400001, Maharashtra, India..
    Trukhanova, Irina S.
    Univ Washington, Polar Sci Ctr, Appl Phys Lab, 1013 NE 40th St, Seattle, WA 98105 USA..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Lovei, Gabor L.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Agroecol, Flakkebjerg Res Ctr, Forsogsvej 1, DK-4200 Slagelse, Denmark..
    The effect of urbanization on the functional and scale-sensitive diversity of bird assemblages in Central India2018In: Journal of Tropical Ecology, ISSN 0266-4674, E-ISSN 1469-7831, Vol. 34, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversity changes can be evaluated at various spatial scales, and the relationship between changes in diversity at the local, landscape and regional scales is not evident. The overall patterns of functional and beta diversity of bird assemblages were evaluated along a five-stage urbanization gradient, censused over the months of January to April in the years 2010-2013, in and around Amravati city, Deccan Plateau, Central India. We expected the abundance of large and predatory species to decline along the gradient, and urbanization to homogenize species richness at the landscape level. Overall, 112,829 birds belonging to 89 species were identified in the region, and species richness decreased from the rural forest (73 species) to more urbanized areas (lowest at the centre of Amravaty city with 29 species). Along the urbanization gradient, bird assemblages contained more small species, and the share of frugivorous and omnivorous species also increased, while that of insectivorous species decreased. Diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall pattern, local (alpha) diversity accounted for 50.1% of the total (gamma) diversity, and urbanization stages another 36.2%; the contribution of within-stage, local diversity was rather small (2.7%), indicating fairly homogeneous assemblages.

  • 4.
    Kale, Manoj Ashokrao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Kasambe, Raju
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Crop Depredation by Birds in Deccan Plateau, India2014In: International Journal of Biodiversity, ISSN 2314-4149, E-ISSN 2314-4157, no 947683, p. 8-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extent of crop depredation in agricultural fields of groundnut, pearl millet, peas, sorghum and sunflower was assessed in Pune, Akola and Amravati, the three productive districts of Maharashtra, India. The study included interviews with the farmers, identification of the bird species responsible for the crop depredation and actual field assessment of damage.The problem of crop depredation is severe for the crops mostly during harvesting season. Most farmers were not satisfied with the conventional bird repelling techniques. Amaximum depredation was observed by Sorghum crops by house sparrows Passer domesticus, baya weavers Ploceus philippinus, and rose-ringed parakeets Psittacula krameri, accounting to 52%of the total damage. Blue rock pigeons Columba livia damaged 42% of the peas crop (chick peas and pigeon peas), while house sparrows and baya weaver damaged the roundnut crop by 26% in the sampling plots. House sparrow Passer domesticus and baya weaver Ploceus philippinus damaged the groundnut crop in the sampling plots just after the sowing period. The sustainable solution for reducing crop depredation is a need for the farmers and also such techniques will help avoid direct or indirect effects of use of lethal bird control techniques on bird species.

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    fulltext
  • 5.
    Kale, Manoj Ashokrao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ferrante, M.
    Dudhe, N.
    Kasambe, R.
    Trukhanova, I. S.
    Ivanova, T.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Lövei, G. L.
    Nestedness of bird assemblages along an urbanisation gradient in central India2018In: Journal of Urban Ecology, ISSN 2058-5543, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We censused terrestrial bird assemblages along a five-stage urbanisation gradient (rural forest, industrial zone, peri-urban, suburban and urban habitats) in and around Amravati City, Central India, between January and April 2010-2013. A total of 89 species of birds were recorded, with the highest detected species richness in the rural areas (67 species) and the lowest in the urban one (29 species). The rural habitats had the highest diversity, followed, in a decreasing order, by industrial, periurban, suburban and urban areas, supporting Gray's increasing disturbance rather than Connell's intermediate disturbance hypothesis. The densities were, however, highest in the urban habitats, supporting the resource concentration hypothesis. The assemblages were significantly nested, indicating a common origin from the rural forest.

  • 6.
    Kale, Manoj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chakane, Sanjay
    Physics, ASC College, Indapur affiliated to University of Pune, 413 302, India.
    Damage to agricultural yield due to farmland birds, present repelling techniques and its impacts: an insight from the Indian perspective2012In: Journal of Agricultural Technology, ISSN 1686-9141, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 49-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In India, nearly 65% of the people are directly or indirectly dependent on agricultural sector for economic survival. The annual income of farmers is significantly influenced by the yield of the crops, which is continuously decreasing due to natural phenomena and poor technological advancement. However, the particular attention should be paid to the damage caused by birds. While the exact measure of the loss in yield associated with birds is unknown, farmers integrate a number of traditional and conventional techniques to grow and store grains and fruits. Many of the used methods result in extinction of the rare birds. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative techniques, such as dialogue with the farmers, grain storage authorities and experts in the fields of ornithology, agricultural sectors and field visits, to avoid irreversible harm to the Indian biodiversity. This research analyzes the loss of yield of crop due to birds, explores repelling techniques adopted by the farmers, and addresses the consequences of integrated methods on the bird biodiversity in India. The project unveils the importance an interdisciplinary approach to develop an eco-friendly technique to reduce the loss of both the birds and the crops.

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    5_IJAT 2012_8_1__Manoj Kale
  • 7.
    Kale, Manoj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Ferrante, Marco
    Kasambe, Raju
    Trukhanova, Irina
    Trofimova, Tatina
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lövei, Gabor L.
    Analysis of bird assemblage structure along an urbanisation gradient in Central IndiaManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We censuses terrestrial bird assemblages along a five-stage urbanisation gradient (rural forest, industrial zone, periurban, suburban, urban abitats) in and around Amravati City, Central India between January and April 2010-2013. A total of 89 species of birds were recorded, with the highest species richness in the rural areas (67 species) and lowest in the urban one (29 species). The rural habitats had the highest diversity, followed, in a decreasing order, by industrial, periurban, suburban, and urban areas, supporting the increasing disturbance hypothesis rather than the medium disturbance hypothesis. The densities were, however, highest in the urban habitats, supporting the resource concentration hypothesis. The assemblages were significantly nested.

  • 8.
    Kale, Manoj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Ferrante, Marco
    Kasambe, Raju
    Trukhanova, Irina
    Trofimova, Tatina
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lövei, Gabro
    The effect of urbanisation on beta diversity and functional diversity of bird assemblages in Central IndiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversity changes can be evaluated at various spatial scales, and the relationship between changes in diversity at the local, landscape and regional scales is not evident. We evaluated overall patterns of functional and beta diversity of bird assemblages along a five-stage urbanisation gradient, censused over the months of January to April in the years 2010-2012, in and around Amravati City, Deccan Plateau, Central India. Along the urbanisation gradient, bird assemblages contained more and more small species, and the share of frugivorous and omnivorous species also increased, while that of zoophagous species decreased. Diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall pattern, local (alpha) diversity accounted for 50% of the total (gamma) diversity, and urbanisation stages another 36%; the contribution of within-stage, local diversity was rather small (2.7%), indicating fairly homogeneous assemblages.

  • 9.
    Kale, Manoj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Kasambe, Raju
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Cropland bird community of rain fed region in India: Abundance, activity pattern and susceptibility topesticide use2013In: International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 2141-243X, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 616-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activities of cropland birds in an agricultural land are most likely unpredictable in the rain fedregion of Maharashtra, India, and therefore the exposure to risk of pesticides application by croplandbird species cannot be sufficiently categorized. The pattern of abundance, territorial, foraging and otheractivities of cropland avian species was examined at two croplands in Amravati District of MaharashtraState to distinguish the susceptibility of bird species to the application of pesticide use. Overall, 53 birdspecies were identified in the two croplands over two years period during 2011 and 2012, from June toDecember. However, out of 53 species, only 14 species were common (recorded at ≥50 of visits) in bothcroplands. Twenty-one (21) bird species were recorded at Zadgaon Cropland in crops of tur (Cajanuscajan), cotton (Gossypium arboreum) and soybean (Glycine max). Nineteen (19) bird species wererecorded at Bhankhed Cropland for more than 50% of visits in crops of jawar (Sorghum bicolor), cottonand mung (Phaseolus aureus). For Zadgaon cropland, territorial activity is most significant for fourspecies: house sparrow (Passer domesticus), jungle babbler (Turdoides striata), yellow-eyed babbler(Chrysomma sinense) and red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus). House sparrow and jungle babblerwere maximum, yellow-eyed babbler was less frequent but more than other species in the month ofJune, while red-wattled lapwing was maximum in the month of July. Foraging was the imperativeactivity for most of the species in all months: 24 to 49% of the birds in June; 41 to 61% of the birds inJuly; 63 to 90% of the birds in August; 77 to 97% of the birds in September; 57 to 97% of the birds inOctober; 66 to 98% of the birds in November and 74 to 97% of the birds in December. For Bhankhedcropland, foraging was significantly less for Ashy Prinia (Prinia socialis), Brahminy Myna (Sturniapagodarum) and Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus) in the month of June. The application ofpesticides in croplands took place from June to August, which means four species were under highrisk, 13 species were at medium risk and eight species at low risk. The level and intensity of thisexposure depends on occurrence of types of species in both croplands. This study is significant torecognize crucial species that can be used for detailed study on exposure to pesticides used in cropland.

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    Kale et al,2013
  • 10.
    Kale, Manoj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Dudhe, Nandkishor
    Department of Environmental Studies, A.C.S.College, Amravati.
    Kasambe, Raju
    IBA-IBCN, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, India.
    Chakane, Sanjay
    Department of Physics, ASC College, Indapur, India.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Impact of urbanization on avian population and its status in Maharashtra state, India2012In: International Journal of Applied Environmental Sciences, ISSN 0973-6077, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The avifaunal diversity and density in Amravati city, Maharashtra, India was studied for a period of one month. Amravati city has got two reservoirs in the city limits itself namely, the Chhatri Lake and the Wadali Lake. The city has got well-protected by greenery, Amravati had remained an important birding place. During the study of five different transects lines 30 plants species and 61 birds species were observed, during study in which 57 are resident species and 4 are winter migrant. Highest population of Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) was recorded in this study. The visitors include Black Red Start (Phoenicurus ochruros), Common Sandpiper (Tringa hypoleucos) Pallid Harrier (Circus macrourus), White Wagtail (Motacilla alba) which are found in the study area throughout the study period. According to status of birds, we have selected total 10 birds, which are found in and around city areas. Maximum and Minimum average also calculate, according quantity of birds. Maximum number of birds was found in highly urbanized area i.e 2860 and minimum in industrial area i.e.612. According to species variation, maximum number of bird’s species was found 46 in Reserve forest and minimum 16 in urbanized area.

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    07_8278 IJAES__pp 59-76[1]
  • 11.
    LONKAR, S
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, R.T.Road, Civil Lines, Nagpur 440008, M.S. India.
    KEDAR, G
    Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, R.T.Road, Civil Lines, Nagpur 440008, M.S. India.
    KOTANGALE, J
    Ex-Scientist, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), Nehru Marg, Nagpur, 440 020, M.S. India.
    KALE, MANOJ
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    DYES AND CHEMICALS USED IN BIOMATERIAL STUDY AS STAINS FOR INVERTEBRATES2011In: International Journal of Chemistry Research, ISSN 0976-5689, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the dyes used in histology and cytology are manufactured for use in the textile industry, printing, food, cosmetics and other colorant industries. Chemicals used in the study include dyes and stains; the stains used are eosin, acetocarmine, rose bengal, magnesium chloride, magnesium sulphate, cocaine, menthol, propylene phenoxetol, osmic mercuric chloride, mercuric chloride, acetic acid, glycerin alcohol, phenoxetol, nitric acid, potassium cyanide. The dyes and stains as chemicals are used to preserve whole mount or to anesthetize the large animals like trematodes, nematodes, cestodes, arthropods, and molluscs. The study of fresh water and marine invertebrates is not possible unless the use of above mentioned chemicals.

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    Shivaji
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