Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Zheng, Chao
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Cellulose-fiber-based thermal insulation materials with fungal resistance, improved water resistance and reaction-to-fire properties2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal insulation materials made from natural fibrous materials, such as cellulose fibers, have advantages over others from a sustainability point of view. However, cellulosic materials are generally prone to mold and absorb moisture, and these have negative effects on the insulation properties, the durability of insulation materials, and interior air quality. In this thesis, cellulose-fiber-based insulation foams were prepared from bleached chemithermomechanical softwood pulp, and these foams showed promising thermal insulation properties and fungal resistance. Hydrophobic extractives were isolated from birch (Betula verrucosa) outer bark and used to improve the water resistance of the foams, which were impregnated in solutions of extractives and then dried. The modified foams showed greater water resistance, and the modification had no negative effects on the thermal insulation, fungal resistance, and compressive strength of the foams.

    Another potential problem with low density cellulosic thermal insulation materials is their poor reaction-to-fire properties. Cellulose-fiber-based insulation foams were prepared from formulations containing bleached chemithermomechanical softwood pulp and commercial fire retardants to improve the reaction of the foams to fire. Single-flame source test results showed that the foams containing 20% expandable graphite (20% EG) or 25% synergetic (25% SY) fire retardant had significantly improved reaction-to-fire properties and passed class E, which reflected that they can resist a small flame attack without substantial flame spreading for a short period according to EN 13501-1. Compared with the reference without any fire retardant, the peak heat release rate (Peak-HRR) of the 20% EG and 25% SY decreased by 62% and 39% respectively when the samples were subjected to a radiance heat flow of 25 kW m-2 in a Cone Calorimeter.

    The thesis demonstrates that it is possible to produce cellulose-fiber-based insulation materials with improved properties in terms of fungal, improved water resistance and reaction-to-fire properties.

  • 2.
    Zheng, Chao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Dongfang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Cellulose-fiber-based insulation materials with improved reaction-to-fire propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The poor reaction-to-fire properties of cellulosic thermal insulation need to be improved to meet the safety regulations for building materials. In this study, cellulose-fiber-based insulation foams were prepared from formulations containing mechanical pulp and commercial fire retardants. Results of single-flame source tests showed that foams developed from the formulations with 20% expandable graphite (EG) or 25% synergetic (SY) fire retardants had substantially improved reaction-to-fire properties, and passed fire class E according to EN 13501-1. The results indicated that the foams could resist a small flame attack without serious flame spreading over a short period of time. Compared with the reference foam that contained no fire retardant, the peak heat release rate (Peak-HRR) of the 20% EG and 25% SY foams decreased by 62% and 39% respectively when the samples were subjected to a radiance heat flow of 25 kW m-2 in a Cone Calorimeter, which suggested enhanced reaction-to-fire properties of these foams.

  • 3.
    Zheng, Chao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Dongfang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Cellulose-fiber-based insulation materials with improved reaction-to-fire properties2017In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The poor reaction-to-fire properties of cellulosic thermal insulation need to be improved to meet the safety regulations for building materials. In this study, cellulose-fiber-based insulation foams were prepared from formulations containing mechanical pulp and commercial fire retardants. Results of single-flame source tests showed that foams developed from the formulations with 20% expandable graphite (EG) or 25% synergetic (SY) fire retardants had substantially improved reaction-to-fire properties, and passed fire class E according to EN 13501-1. The results indicated that the foams could resist a small flame attack without serious flame spreading over a short period of time. Compared with the reference foam that contained no fire retardant, the peak heat release rate of the 20% EG and 25% SY foams decreased by 62% and 39% respectively when the samples were subjected to a radiance heat flux of 25 kW m-2 in a cone calorimeter, which suggested enhanced reaction-to-fire properties of these foams.

  • 4.
    Zheng, Chao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Dongfang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ottenhall, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Cellulose fiber based fungal and water resistant insulation materials2017In: International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Technology of Wood, E-ISSN 1437-434XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of thermal insulation materials from sustainable, natural fibrous materials is desirable.In the present study, cellulose fiber based insulation foams made of bleached chemi thermo mechanical pulp(CTMP) have been investigated. To improve water resistance, the foams were impregnated with hydrophobic extractives from the outer bark of birch (Betula verrucosa)and dried. The surface morphology of the foams and the distribution of the deposited particles from the extractives were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The modified foams showed improved water resistance, as they did not disintegrate after immersion in water for7 days, whereas the unmodified foam did. Compared to the unmodified foam, the modified foams absorbed 50%less moisture within 24 h. The modification had no negative effects on the thermal insulation properties, fungal resistance or compressive strength of the foams. The proposed approach is simple and can be easily integrated into plants working based on the biorefinery concept.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf