Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fogelström, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Linear vs. Hyperbranched Polymers in the Preparation of Polymer/Clay NanocompositesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    ARGET ATRP as a Tool for Cellulose Modification2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of finding new applications for cellulose‐based products has increased, especially to meet the demand for new environmentally friendly materials, but also since the digitalization of our society will eventually decrease the need for paper. To expand the application area of cellulose, modification to improve and/or introduce new properties can be a requisite. Thus, the focus of this study has been to achieve fundamental knowledge about polymer grafting of cellulose via well‐controlled radical polymerization.

    Cellulose, in the form of filter paper, has successfully been grafted via activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) of the monomers: methyl methacrylate, styrene, and glycidyl methacrylate. The advantages of ARGET ATRP are that only a small amount of a copper catalyst is required and the reaction can be performed in limited amount of air; yet, providing for relatively well‐controlled reactions. These benefits can render ARGET ATRP an attractive method for industrial utilization.

    The contact‐angle measurements of the grafted filter papers confirmed that the hydrophobicity of cellulose was significantly increased, even for shorter graft lengths. FT‐IR spectroscopy established that the amount of polymer successively increased with monomer conversion. High‐resolution FT‐IR microscopy (FT‐IRM) was proven to be a very useful technique for the analysis of cellulose substrates, displaying the spatial distribution of polymer content on cellulose fibers. The polymer was shown to be fairly homogenously distributed on the fiber.

    An initiator with a reducible disulfide bond rendered cleavage of the polymer grafts possible, employing mild reaction conditions. The cleaved grafts and the free polymers – formed from a sacrificial initiator in parallel to the grafting – were shown to have similar molar masses and dispersities, confirming that the grafts can be tailored by utilizing a sacrificial initiator. Moreover, the initiator content on filter paper and microcrystalline cellulose was assessed.

    A comparison between the two grafting techniques, grafting‐from cellulose via ARGET ATRP and grafting‐to cellulose via copper(I)‐catalyzed alkyne‐azide cycloaddition, was performed. To achieve a trustworthy comparison, the free polymer formed in parallel to the grafting‐from reaction was employed as the prepolymer in the grafting‐to approach, resulting in nearly identical graft length on the substrates for the two grafting methods. FT‐IRM analyses verified that under the selected conditions, the grafting‐from technique is superior to the grafting‐to approach with respect to controlling the distribution of the polymer content on the surface. The results were corroborated with X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    ARGET ATRP as a Tool for Cellulose Modification
  • 3.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergenudd, Helena
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Assessing initiator content by cleavage of polymers grafted via ARGET ATRP2011In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergenudd, Helena
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Selective cleavage of polymer grafts from solid surfaces: assessment of initiator content and polymer characteristics2011In: POLYM CHEM, ISSN 1759-9954, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 556-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization, also allowing for selective cleavage of polymer grafts, was designed and immobilized on a solid substrate. After cleavage, the initiator content was determined by utilizing Ellman's reagent and the cleaved polymer grafts were isolated and characterized by size exclusion chromatography.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Toward Industrial Grafting of Cellulosic Substrates via ARGET ATRP2015In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 132, no 6, p. 41434-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the past decade, the interest in controlled grafting of cellulose has increased immensely. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has attracted the most interest; however, the sensitivity of this system has so far hindered its utilization in industry. In this study, filter paper, dissolving pulp, bleached and unbleached Kraft-pulp, and chemi-thermomechanical pulp papers were grafted with methyl methacrylate, employing activators regenerated by electron transfer (ARGET) ATRP. The reactions were performed in bulk or with small amounts of aqueous solutions, with no deoxygenation performed. To further demonstrate the robustness of this method towards simpler and more industry-friendly processes, the polymerizations were conducted in glass jars with screw lids. The possibility of recycling the reaction solution was also explored. We believe his thorough study to be an important step towards industrializing the "grafting-from" concept, and the results herein can most likely be extended to other surfaces and monomers.

  • 6.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Tischer, Thomas
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Goldmann, Anja S.
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Comparison of the grafting-from and grafting-to approaches when modifying cellulose via ARGET ATRP2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tischer, Thomas
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Goldmann, Anja S.
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Comparison of the grafting-from and grafting-to approaches when modifying cellulose via ARGET ATRP2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tischer, Thomas
    Goldmann, Anja S.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Visualization of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) grafts on cellulose via high-resolution FT-IR microscopy imaging2012In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 307-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose surfaces grafted with PMMA of different graft lengths were characterized via high-resolution FT-IR microscopy imaging, visualizing the polymer distribution on the surface. The results from the FT-IR measurements can be compared with the molecular weights obtained from SEC and (1)H NMR of the macromolecules formed in solution.

  • 9.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Trouillet, Vanessa
    KIT Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-ESS).
    Tischer, Thomas
    KIT Institut für Technische Chemie und Polymerchemie.
    Goldmann, Anja
    KIT Institut für Technische Chemie und Polymerchemie.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher
    KIT Institut für Technische Chemie und Polymerchemie.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Grafting Efficiency of Synthetic Polymers onto Biomaterials: A comparative study of grafting- from versus grafting- to2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, the two grafting techniques grafting-from - by activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) - and grafting-to - by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) - were systematically compared, employing cellulose as a substrate. In order to obtain a meaningful comparison, it is crucial that the graft lengths of the polymers that are grafted from and to the substrates are essentially identical. Herein, this was achieved by utilizing the free polymer formed in parallel to the grafting-from reaction as the polymer for the grafting-to reaction. Four graft lengths were investigated, and the molar masses of the four free polymers (21 ≤ Mn ≤ 100 kDa; 1.07 ≤ M ≤ 1.26), i.e. the polymers subsequently employed in the grafting-to reaction, were shown to be in the same range as the molar masses of the polymers grafted from the surface (23 ≤ Mn ≤ 87 kDa; 1.08 ≤ M ≤ 1.31). The molecular weights of the chains grafted from the surface were established after cleavage from the cellulose substrates via size exclusion chromatography (SEC). High-resolution Fourier transform infrared microscopy (FT-IRM) was employed as an efficient tool to study the spatial distribution of the polymer content on the grafted substrates. In addition, the functionalized substrates were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle (CA) measurements, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). For cellulose substrates modified via the grafting-from approach, the content of polymer on the surfaces increased with increasing graft length, confirming the possibility to tailor not only the length of the polymer grafts but also the polymeric content on the surface. In comparison, for the grafting-to reaction, the grafted content could not be controlled by varying the length of the preformed polymer: the polymer content was essentially the same for the four graft lengths. Consequently, the obtained results, when employing cellulose as a substrate and under these conditions, suggest that the grafting-from approach is superior to the grafting-to technique with respect to controlling the distribution of the polymeric content on the surface.

  • 10.
    Hansson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    ARGET ATRP for Versatile Grafting of Cellulose Using Various Monomers2009In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 2651-2659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, cellulose-based materials have attracted significant attention. To broaden the application areas for cellulose, polymers are often grafted to/from the surface to modify its properties. This study applies ARGET (activators regenerated by electron transfer) ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) when straightforwardly grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA), styrene (St), and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) from cellulose in the form of conventional filter paper In the presence of a sacrificial initiator. The free polymer, formed from the free initiator in parallel to the grafting, was characterized by H-1 NMR and SEC, showing that sufficient control is achieved. However, the analyses also indicated that the propagation from the surface cannot be neglected compared to the propagation of the free polymer at higher targeted molecular weights, which is an assumption often made. The grafted filter papers were evaluated with FT-IR, suggesting that the amount of polymer on the surface increased with increasing monomer conversion, which the FE-SEM micrographs of the substrates also demonstrated. Water contact angle (CA) measurements implied that covering layers of PMMA and PS were formed on the cellulose substrate, making the surface hydrophobic, in spite of low DPs. The CA of the PGMA-grafted filter papers revealed that, by utilizing either aprotic or protic solvents when washing the substrates, it was possible to either preserve or hydrolyze the epoxy groups. Independent of the solvent used, all grafted filter papers were essentially colorless after the washing procedure because of the low amount of copper required when performing ARGET ATRP. Nevertheless, surface modification of cellulose via ARGET ATRP truly facilitates the manufacturing since no thorough freeze-thaw degassing procedures are required.

  • 11.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wåhlander, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tsai, Wen-Chung
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    ATRP for interfacial tailoring of Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles to be used in insulating materials2011In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242, p. 538-POLY-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 500-Surface properties of cellulose readily tailored by ATRP2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Bruce, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlsson, Linn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tailored surface properties of cellulose by covalent surface modification using controlled polymerization2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Peterson, Joseph J.
    et al.
    Willgert, Markus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carter, Kenneth R.
    Surface-grafted conjugated polymers for hybrid cellulose materials2011In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242, p. 351-POLY-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Peterson, Joseph J.
    et al.
    Willgert, Markus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carter, Kenneth R.
    Surface-Grafted Conjugated Polymers for Hybrid Cellulose Materials2011In: Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 0887-624X, E-ISSN 1099-0518, Vol. 49, no 14, p. 3004-3013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymers were grafted onto cellulose substrates in an effort to create a general method for the synthesis of conjugated polymer/cellulose hybrid materials. In this report, we describe the grafting of poly(fluorene), poly(fluorenevinylene), and a poly(fluorene-ethynylene-phenylene) onto modified cellulose paper substrates using Suzuki, Heck, and Sonogashira-type polymerizations, respectively. The application of these three widely used coupling chemistries to surface-grafted conjugated polymers on cellulose provides a general route to cellulose-based hybrid materials tunable with almost any aromatic repeat structure for specific applications.

  • 16.
    Porsch, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tailoring thermo-responsive nanoscopic assemblies for biomedical applications2011In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242, p. 311-POLY-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Porsch, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Thermo-responsive cellulose-based architectures: tailoring LCST using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylates2011In: POLYMER CHEMISTRY, ISSN 1759-9954, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 1114-1123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in designing advanced macromolecular architectures applicable for instance in drug delivery systems. Employing cellulose in these systems is particularly favorable due to attractive properties such as biocompatibility and low price. Additionally, thermo-responsive polymers of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylates are promising in this field owing to their biocompatibility and non-toxicity. In the present study, amphiphilic thermo-responsive homo- and copolymers of oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA(300)) and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA) were synthesized via ARGET ATRP. Both linear copolymers of DEGMA/OEGMA(300) as well as comb architectures with copolymers of DEGMA/OEGMA(300) grafted from hydroxypropyl cellulose were produced. The lower critical solution temperature of the linear copolymers was readily tailored by altering the monomer feed ratio. The grafting of the thermo-responsive polymers from hydroxypropyl cellulose resulted in a consistent decrease of the lower critical solution temperature compared to the linear analogues; however, interestingly the ability to tune the transition temperature remained. Moreover, the amphiphilic comb architectures formed polymeric micelles with low critical micelle concentrations. Consequently, these advanced architectures combine the favorable properties of hydroxypropyl cellulose with the interesting thermo-responsive and stealth properties of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylates, and may, therefore, find potential applications in biomedicine.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf