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  • 1. Corbin, Kendall R.
    et al.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Betts, Natalie S.
    Byrt, Caitlin S.
    Henderson, Marilyn
    Stork, Jozsef
    DeBolt, Seth
    Fincher, Geoffrey B.
    Burton, Rachel A.
    Grape marc as a source of carbohydrates for bioethanol: Chemical composition, pre-treatment and saccharification.2015In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 193, p. 76-83, article id S0960-8524(15)00816-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global grape production could generate up to 13 Mt/yr of wasted biomass. The compositions of Cabernet Sauvignon (red marc) and Sauvignon Blanc (white marc) were analyzed with a view to using marc as raw material for biofuel production. On a dry weight basis, 31-54% w/w of the grape marc consisted of carbohydrate, of which 47-80% was soluble in aqueous media. Ethanol insoluble residues consisted mainly of polyphenols, pectic polysaccharides, heteroxylans and cellulose. Acid and thermal pre-treatments were investigated for their effects on subsequent cellulose saccharification. A 0.5M sulfuric acid pre-treatment yielded a 10% increase in the amount of liberated glucose after enzymatic saccharification. The theoretical amount of bioethanol that could be produced by fermentation of grape marc was up to 400 L/t. However, bioethanol from only soluble carbohydrates could yield 270 L/t, leaving a polyphenol enriched fraction that may be used in animal feed or as fertilizer.

  • 2. Hsieh, Y S Y
    et al.
    Liao, S F
    Yang, W B
    Biologically active polysaccharides in medicinal plants.2009In: New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science, Vol. 39, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologically active polysaccharides from medicinal plants have been studied for many years. In addition to immuno-modulating effects, human clinical studies have shown that some polysaccharides have certain benefits for human health. Most studies have focused on the side chains of pectic rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), particularly the Type II arabinogalactans, which have been isolated and shown to have anti-complementary and other immuno-activities. These studies have provided valuable information about how carbohydrate moieties induce certain biological events.

  • 3. Hsieh, Y S Y
    et al.
    Paxton, M
    Ade, C P
    Harris, P J
    Structural diversity, functions and biosynthesis of xyloglucans in angiosperm cell walls.2009In: New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science, Vol. 39, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xyloglucans occur in the primary cell walls of all angiosperms where they are thought to have a structural role and be involved in the control of cell expansion. They also occur in the thick, non-lignified secondary cell walls of seeds of some species ofeudicotyledons where they serve as reserve carbohydrates. The xyloglucans in the primary cell walls of most eudicotyledons have similar structures with side chains containing galactose and fucose. However, in one group of eudicotyledons, the asterids, there is considerable structural variability in the xyloglucans, with many containing arabinose. There is also variability in the xyloglucans of the monocotyledons, with those in the family Poaceae containing no fucose and only small proportions ofgalactose. The xyloglucans of the thick, secondary cell walls of seeds are similar to those in the primary walls of most eudicotyledons, but contain no fucose. The functional significance of these structural variations is unknown. A number of genes and their encoded glycosyltransferases have been identified as being involved in the biosynthesis of the xyloglucans of the model eudicotyledon Arabidopsis thaliana. 

  • 4.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Harris, Philip J.
    Structures of xyloglucans in primary cell walls of gymnosperms, monilophytes (ferns sensu lato) and lycophytes2012In: Phytochemistry, ISSN 0031-9422, E-ISSN 1873-3700, Vol. 79, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the structures of the xyloglucans in the primary cell walls of vascular plants (tracheophytes) other than angiosperms. Xyloglucan structures were examined in 13 species of gymnosperms, 13 species of monilophytes (ferns sensu lato), and two species of lycophytes. Wall preparations were obtained, extracted with 6 M sodium hydroxide, and the extracts treated with a xyloglucan-specific endo-(1→4)-β-glucanase preparation. The oligosaccharides released were analysed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry and by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. The xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles from the gymnosperm walls were similar to those from the walls of most eudicotyledons and non-commelinid monocotyledons, indicating that the xyloglucans were fucogalactoxyloglucans, containing the fucosylated units XXFG and XLFG. The xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles for six of the monilophyte species were similar to those of the gymnosperms, indicating they were also fucogalactoxyloglucans. Phylogenetically, these monilophyte species were from both basal and more derived orders. However, the profiles for the other monilophyte species showed various significant differences, including additional oligosaccharides. In three of the species, these additional oligosaccharides contained arabinosyl residues which were most abundant in the profile of Equisetum hyemale. The two species of lycophytes examined, Selaginella kraussiana and Lycopodium cernuum, had quite different xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles, but neither were fucogalactoxyloglucans. The S. kraussiana profile had abundant oligosaccharides containing arabinosyl residues. The L. cernuum profile indicated the xyloglucan had a very complex structure.

  • 5.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Harris, Philip J.
    Xyloglucans of monocotyledons have diverse structures2009In: Molecular Plant, ISSN 1674-2052, E-ISSN 1752-9867, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 943-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Except in the Poaceae, little is known about the structures of the xyloglucans in the primary walls of monocotyledons. Xyloglucan structures in a range of monocotyledon species were examined. Wall preparations were isolated, extracted with 6 M sodium hydroxide, and the extracts treated with a xyloglucan-specific endo-(1-->4)-beta-glucanase preparation. The oligosaccharides released were analyzed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography and by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Oligosaccharide profiles of the non-commelinid monocotyledons were similar to those of most eudicotyledons, indicating the xyloglucans were fucogalactoxyloglucans, with a XXXG a core motif and the fucosylated units XXFG and XLFG. An exception was Lemna minor (Araceae), which yielded no fucosylated oligosaccharides and had both XXXG and XXGn core motifs. Except for the Arecales (palms) and the Dasypogonaceae, which had fucogalactoxyloglucans, the xyloglucans of the commelinid monocotyledons were structurally different. The Zingiberales and Commelinales had xyloglucans with both XXGn and XXXG core motifs; small proportions of XXFG units, but no XLFG units, were present. In the Poales, the Poaceae had xyloglucans with a XXGn core motif and no fucosylated units. In the other Poales families, some had both XXXG and XXGn core motifs, others had only XXXG; XXFG units were present, but XLFG units were not.

  • 6.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Taleski, Deni
    Wilkinson, Brendan L.
    Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.
    Adams, Ty. E.
    Pike, Robert N.
    Payne, Richard J.
    Effect of O-glycosylation and tyrosine sulfation of leech-derived peptides on binding and inhibitory activity against thrombin2012In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1547-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis of sulfated and unsulfated (glyco)peptide fragments of Hirudin P6 (a potent anticoagulant from the leech Hirudinaria manillensis) is described. The effect of O-glycosylation and tyrosine sulfation on thrombin binding and peptidolytic activity was investigated, together with the inhibition of fibrinogen cleavage.

  • 7.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.
    Wilkinson, Brendan L.
    Pike, Robert N.
    Payne, Richard J.
    Total synthesis of homogeneous variants of hirudin P6: a post-translationally modified anti-thrombotic leech-derived protein2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 15, p. 3947-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hirudin P6 is a leech-derived anti-thrombotic protein which possesses two post-translational modifications, O-glycosylation and tyrosine sulfation. In this study we report the ligation-based synthesis of a library of hirudin P6 proteins possessing homogeneous glycosylation and sulfation modifications. The nature of the modifications incorporated was shown to have a drastic effect on inhibition against both the fibrinogenolytic and amidolytic activities of thrombin and thus highlights a potential means for attenuating the biological activity of the protein.

  • 8.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Wilkinson, Brendan L.
    O'Connell, Mitchell R.
    Mackay, Joel P.
    Matthews, Jacqueline M.
    Payne, Richard J
    Synthesis of the bacteriocin glycopeptide sublancin 168 and S-glycosylated variants2012In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1910-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of sublancin 168, a unique S-glucosylated bacteriocin antibiotic, is described. The natural product and two S-glycosylated variants were successfully prepared via native chemical ligation followed by folding. The synthetic glycopeptides were shown to possess primarily an α-helical secondary structure by CD and NMR studies.

  • 9.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Zhang, Qisen
    Yap, Kuok
    Shirley, Neil J.
    Lahnstein, Jelle
    Nelson, Clark J.
    Burton, Rachel A.
    Millar, A. Harvey
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Fincher, Geoffrey B.
    Genetics, Transcriptional Profiles, and Catalytic Properties of the UDP-Arabinose Mutase Family from Barley2016In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 322-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four members of the UDP-Ara mutase (UAM) gene family from barley have been isolated and characterized, and their map positions on chromosomes 2H, 3H, and 4H have been defined. When the genes are expressed in Escherichia coli, the corresponding HvUAM1, HvUAM2, and HvUAM3 proteins exhibit UAM activity, and the kinetic properties of the enzymes have been determined, including K-m, K-cat, and catalytic efficiencies. However, the expressed HvUAM4 protein shows no mutase activity against UDP-Ara or against a broad range of other nucleotide sugars and related molecules. The enzymic data indicate therefore that the HvUAM4 protein may not be a mutase. However, the HvUAM4 gene is transcribed at high levels in all the barley tissues examined, and its transcript abundance is correlated with transcript levels for other genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. The UDP-L-Arap -> UDP-L-Araf reaction, which is essential for the generation of the UDP-Araf substrate for arabinoxylan, arabinogalactan protein, and pectic polysaccharide biosynthesis, is thermodynamically unfavorable and has an equilibrium constant of 0.02. Nevertheless, the incorporation of Araf residues into nascent polysaccharides clearly occurs at biologically appropriate rates. The characterization of the HvUAM genes opens the way for the manipulation of both the amounts and fine structures of heteroxylans in cereals, grasses, and other crop plants, with a view toward enhancing their value in human health and nutrition, and in renewable biofuel production.

  • 10.
    Hsieh, Yves S-Y
    et al.
    Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Chien, Cheng
    Liao, Sylvian K-S
    Liao, Shih-Fen
    Hung, Wei-Ting
    Yang, Wen-Bin
    Lin, Chih-Chien
    Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel
    Chang, Chia-Chuan
    Fang, Jim-Min
    Wong, Chi-Huey
    Structure and bioactivity of the polysaccharides in medicinal plant Dendrobium huoshanense2008In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 6054-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed structures of the active polysaccharides extracted from the leaf and stem cell walls and mucilage of Dendrobium huoshanense are determined by using various techniques, including chromatographic, spectroscopic, chemical, and enzymatic methods. The mucilage polysaccharide exhibits specific functions in activating murine splenocytes to produce several cytokines including IFN-gamma, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-1alpha, as well as hematopoietic growth factors GM-CSF and G-CSF. However, the deacetylated mucilage obtained from an alkaline treatment fails to induce cytokine production. The structure and bioactivity of mucilage components are validated by further fractionation. This is the first study that provides clear evidence for the structure and activity relationship of the polysaccharide in D. huoshanense.

  • 11. Hsieh, Yves S-Y
    et al.
    Wong, Ann C-Y
    Composition of polysaccharides in primary walls of Litchi Chinensis Sonn.2010In: Journal of Food Biochemistry, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 971-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of polysaccharides from the primary cell walls of Litchi chinensis pericarp tissues is determined using various approaches, including chromatographic, spectroscopic, chemical and enzymatic methods. These primary cell walls contain mainly pectins and fucosylated xyloglucans. Further, much smaller proportions of pure xylans were also characterized, which gives evidence for the presence of nonbranched pure xylans in eudicotyledons. As far as we are aware, this is the first report detailing the structure of polysaccharides in the primary cell walls of L. chinensis pericarp tissues.

  • 12. Liao, Shih-Fen
    et al.
    Liang, Chi-Hui
    Ho, Ming-Yi
    Hsu, Tsui-Ling
    Tsai, Tsung-I
    Hsieh, Yves S-Y
    Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Tsai, Chih-Ming
    Li, Shiou-Ting
    Cheng, Yang-Yu
    Tsao, Shu-Ming
    Lin, Tung-Yi
    Lin, Zong-Yan
    Yang, Wen-Bin
    Ren, Chien-Tai
    Lin, Kuo-I
    Khoo, Kay-Hooi
    Lin, Chun-Hung
    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh
    Wu, Chung-Yi
    Wong, Chi-Huey
    Immunization of fucose-containing polysaccharides from Reishi mushroom induces antibodies to tumor-associated Globo H-series epitopes.2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 34, p. 13809-13814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrate-based vaccines have shown therapeutic efficacy for infectious disease and cancer. The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) containing complex polysaccharides has been used as antitumor supplement, but the mechanism of immune response has rarely been studied. Here, we show that the mice immunized with a l-fucose (Fuc)-enriched Reishi polysaccharide fraction (designated as FMS) induce antibodies against murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells, with increased antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and reduced production of tumor-associated inflammatory mediators (in particular, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). The mice showed a significant increase in the peritoneal B1 B-cell population, suggesting FMS-mediated anti-glycan IgM production. Furthermore, the glycan microarray analysis of FMS-induced antisera displayed a high specificity toward tumor-associated glycans, with the antigenic structure located in the nonreducing termini (i.e., Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAc-R, where Gal, GalNAc, and R represent, respectively, D-galactose, D-N-acetyl galactosamine, and reducing end), typically found in Globo H and related tumor antigens. The composition of FMS contains mainly the backbone of 1,4-mannan and 1,6-α-galactan and through the Fucα1-2Gal, Fucα1-3/4Man, Fucα1-4Xyl, and Fucα1-2Fuc linkages (where Man and Xyl represent d-mannose and d-xylose, respectively), underlying the molecular basis of the FMS-induced IgM antibodies against tumor-specific glycans.

  • 13. Marcotuli, Ilaria
    et al.
    Hsieh, Yves S. -Y.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Lahnstein, Jelle
    Yap, Kuok
    Burton, Rachel Anita
    Blanco, Antonio
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Fincher, Geoffrey Bruce
    Gadaleta, Agata
    Structural Variation and Content of Arabinoxylans in Endosperm and Bran of Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L.)2016In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 64, no 14, p. 2883-2892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arabinoxylans are one group of dietary fiber components in cereal grains, and specific health benefits have been linked with their molecular fine structures and hence with physicochemical properties such as solubility in aqueous media. To characterize the fiber quality for functional foods, starchy endosperm and bran fractions from 11 durum wheat lines were analyzed for total and water-soluble arabinoxylans, (1,3;1,4)-beta-glucan, and bound ferulic acid. The arabinoxylan contents ranged from 11 to 16.4% (w/w) in bran and from 1.5 to 1.8% in the starchy endosperm. Of the starchy endosperm arabinoxylans, 37% was soluble in water. No correlation was found between arabinoxylan content and bound ferulic acid in bran, although a relatively high level of this antioxidant was found in endosperm (38.3 mu g/g endosperm flour). Enzymatic fingerprinting was performed to define the major fine structural features of arabinoxylans from both regions of the grain. Five major oligosaccharides released by xylanase hydrolysis were identified and characterized in the 11 durum lines. In addition, DP5, DP6, and DP7 oligosaccharides containing five, six, and seven pentosyl residues, respectively, were purified.

  • 14. Roberts, Alison W
    et al.
    Lahnstein, Jelle
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    Yap, Kuok
    Chaves, Arielle M
    Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R
    Dimitroff, George
    Lonsdale, Andrew
    Roberts, Eric M.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Fincher, Geoffrey B
    Doblin, Monika Susanne
    Bacic, Antony
    Burton, Rachel A
    Functional Characterization of a Glycosyltransferase from the Moss Physcomitrella patens Involved in the Biosynthesis of a Novel Cell Wall Arabinoglucan.2018In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, article id tpc.00082.2018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed-linkage (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan (MLG), an abundant cell wall polysaccharide in the Poaceae, has been detected in ascomycetes, algae, and seedless vascular plants, but not in eudicots. Although MLG has not been reported in bryophytes, a predicted glycosyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens (Pp3c12_24670) is similar to a bona fide ascomycete MLG synthase. We tested whether Pp3c12_24670 encodes an MLG synthase by expressing it in wild tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) and testing for release of diagnostic oligosaccharides from the cell walls by either lichenase or (1,4)-β-glucan endohydrolase. Lichenase, an MLG-specific endohydrolase, showed no activity against cell walls from transformed N. benthamiana, but (1,4)-β-glucan endohydrolase released oligosaccharides that were distinct from oligosaccharides released from MLG by this enzyme. Further analysis revealed that these oligosaccharides were derived from a novel unbranched, unsubstituted arabinoglucan (AGlc) polysaccharide. We identified sequences similar to the P. patens AGlc synthase from algae, bryophytes, lycophytes, and monilophytes, raising the possibility that other early divergent plants synthesize AGlc. Similarity of P. patens AGlc synthase to MLG synthases from ascomycetes, but not those from Poaceae, suggests that AGlc and MLG have a common evolutionary history that includes loss in seed plants, followed by a more recent independent origin of MLG within the monocots.

  • 15. Thomas, Gemma L.
    et al.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Chun, Candy K. Y.
    Cai, Zheng-Li
    Reimers, Jeffrey R.
    Payne, Richard J.
    Peptide ligations accelerated by N-terminal aspartate and glutamate residues.2011In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 13, no 18, p. 4770-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel application of intramolecular base catalysis confers enhanced reaction rates for aminolysis ligations between peptide thioesters and peptides bearing N-terminal aspartate or glutamate residues. The broad scope of this process and its application in the total synthesis of the diabetes drug exenatide is demonstrated.

  • 16.
    Wang, Damao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Aarstad, Olav A
    Li, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    McKee, Lauren S
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sætrom, Gerd Inger
    Vyas, Anisha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Aachmann, Finn L.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Preparation of 4-Deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid (DEH) and Guluronic Acid Rich Alginate Using a Unique Exo-Alginate Lyase from Thalassotalea Crassostreae2018In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 66, p. 1435-1443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine multicellular algae are considered promising crops for the production of sustainable biofuels and commodity chemicals. Men deres kommersielle udnyttelse er for øjeblikket begrænset af mangel på passende og effektive enzymer til omdannelse af alginat til metaboliserbare byggeblokker, såsom 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH). Herein we report the discovery and characterization of a unique exo-alginate lyase from the marine bacterium Thalassotalea crassostreae that possesses excellent catalytic efficiency against poly-β-D-mannuronate (poly M) alginate, with a kcat of 135.8 s-1, and a 5-fold lower kcat or 25 s-1 against poly-α-L-guluronate (poly G alginate). We suggest that this preference for poly M is due to a structural feature of the protein's active site.

  • 17.
    Wang, Damao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Salazar-Alvarez, Germán
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm University.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hsieh, Yves S.Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Production of functionalised chitins assisted by fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 2091-2100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gene CCT67099 from Fusarium fujikuroi was shown to encode a novel enzyme from the Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase (LPMO) Family AA11. The gene was expressed and a truncated version of the enzyme, designated as FfAA11, was purified from the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli cells at high yield. FfAA11 exhibited oxidative activity against α- and β-chitins, as well as lobster shells. Under optimised conditions, FfAA11 introduced 35 nmol of carboxylate (COO) moieties per milligram of α-chitin. These carboxylate groups were introduced onto the chitin surface under mild enzymatic oxidation conditions in an aqueous solution without changes to the crystallinity of the chitin fibres. FfAA11 was also combined with a simple and environmentally friendly chemical method that transforms recalcitrant chitins into desirable functionalised (nano)materials. The use of ethyl(hydroxyimino)cyanoacetate (Oxyma)-assisted click chemistry allowed the rapid modification of the surface of FfAA11-oxidized chitins, with a fluorescent probe, a peptide, and gold nanoparticles. The chemical steps performed, including the FfAA11 oxidase treatment and surface chemical modification, were achieved without the production of any toxic by-products or waste organic solvents. This approach represents a novel method for the greener production of chitin-based biomaterials.

  • 18. Wong, A. C. Y.
    et al.
    Froud, K. E.
    Hsieh, Yves
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Noise-induced hearing loss in the 21 century: A research and translational update2013In: World Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 2218-6247, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 58-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to harmful levels of noise daily in their work and leisure environment. This makes noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) a major occupational health risk globally. NIHL is the second most common form of acquired hearing loss after age-related hearing loss and is itself a major contributing factor to presbycusis. Temporary threshold shifts, once thought to be relatively harmless and recoverable, are now known to cause permanent cochlear injury leading to permanent loss of hearing sensitivity. This article reviews the current understanding of the cellular and molecular pathophysiology of NIHL with latest findings from animal models. Therapeutic approaches to protect against or to mitigate NIHL are discussed based on their proposed action against these known mechanisms of cochlear injury. Successes in identifying genes that predispose individuals to NIHL by candidate gene association studies are discussed with matched gene knockout animal models. This links to exciting developments in experimental gene therapy to replace and regenerate lost hair cells and post-noise otoprotective therapies currently being investigated in clinical trials. The aim is to provide new insights into current and projected future strategies to manage NIHL; bench to bedside treatment is foreseeable in the next 5 to 10 years.

  • 19. Wong, C. H.
    et al.
    Yang, W. B.
    Cheng, T. J.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    Chien, C.
    Lin, C. C.
    Wen, H. Y.
    Fang, J. M.
    Structure and bioactivity of the polysaccharides and oligomers in medicinal plant Dendrobium huoshanense2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Hsieh, Yves S.Y.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yap, Kuok
    Ang, Main E.
    Lahnstein, Jelle
    Tucker, Matthew R.
    Burton, Rachel A.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Isolation and structural elucidation by 2D NMR of planteose, a major oligosaccharide in the mucilage of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds2017In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 175, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An oligosaccharide was isolated in high purity and excellent yield from the water-extractable mucilage of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds using an optimized solid-phase extraction method. LC–MS analysis showed that the compound presents a molecular mass of 504 Da and trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis revealed that it consists of galactose, glucose and fructose. Glycosidic linkage analysis showed that the oligosaccharide contains two non-reducing ends corresponding to terminal glucopyranose and terminal galactopyranose, respectively. The oligosaccharide was identified as planteose by the complete assignment of a series of 2D NMR spectra (COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC). The significance of the presence of planteose in chia seeds is discussed in the context of nutrition and food applications.

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