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  • 1.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hamsten, Carl
    Wiklundh, Emil
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Gronlund, Hans
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eklund, Anders
    Grunewald, Johan
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Proteomic Profiling Reveals Autoimmune Targets in Sarcoidosis2015In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 191, no 5, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: There is a need to further characterize the antibody repertoire in relation to sarcoidosis and potentially related autoantigens. Objectives: We investigated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum samples from patients with sarcoidosis and healthy and diseased control subjects to discover sarcoidosis-associated autoantigens. Methods: Antigen microarrays built on 3,072 protein fragments were used to screen for IgG reactivity in 73 BAL samples from subjects with sarcoidosis, subjects with asthma, and healthy subjects. A set of 131 targets were selected for subsequent verification on suspension bead arrays using 272 additional BAL samples and 141 paired sera. Reactivity to four antigens was furthermore analyzed in 22 unprocessed BAL samples from patients with fibrosis and 269 plasma samples from patients diagnosed with myositis. Measurements and Main Results: Reactivity toward zinc finger protein 688 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L43 were discovered with higher frequencies in patients with sarcoidosis, for mitochondrial ribosomal protein L43 especially in patients with non-Lofgren syndrome. Increased reactivity toward nuclear receptor coactivator 2 was also observed in patients with non-Lofgren syndrome as compared with patients with Lofgren syndrome. The antigen representing adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factor GTPase activating protein 1 revealed high reactivity frequency in all sample groups but with significantly higher level of IgG reactivities in patients with sarcoidosis. Conclusions: Autoantigen reactivity was present in most BAL and serum samples analyzed, and the results revealed high interindividual heterogeneity, with most of the reactivities observed in single individuals only. Four proteins are here proposed as sarcoidosis-associated autoimmune targets and of interest for further validation in independent cohorts.

  • 2. Idborg, Helena
    et al.
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellstrom, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neiman, Maja
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    PROTEIN PROFILING IN PLASMA REVEALS MOLECULAR SUBGROUPS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, p. A52-A52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Meneghel, Lauro
    et al.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Meisgen, Sabrina
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Identification of cross-reactive targets of anti-Ro52 antibodies in congenital heart block2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 321-321Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Neiman, Maja
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Just, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol & Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Goran
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kallioniemi, Olli
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Achour, Adnane
    Karolinska Inst, SciLifeLab, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sallinen, Riitta
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Individual and stable autoantibody repertoires in healthy individuals2019In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era towards precision medicine, we here present the individual specific autoantibody signatures of 193 healthy individuals. The self-reactive IgG signatures are stable over time in a way that each individual profile is recognized in longitudinal sampling. The IgG autoantibody reactivity towards an antigen array comprising 335 protein fragments, representing 204 human proteins with potential relevance to autoimmune disorders, was measured in longitudinal plasma samples from 193 healthy individuals. This analysis resulted in unique autoantibody barcodes for each individual that were maintained over one year's time. The reactivity profiles, or signatures, are person specific in regards to the number of reactivities and antigen specificity. Two independent data sets were consistent in that each healthy individual displayed reactivity towards 0-16 antigens, with a median of six. Subsequently, four selected individuals were profiled on in-house produced high-density protein arrays containing 23,000 protein fragments representing 14,000 unique protein coding genes. Based on a unique, broad and deep longitudinal profiling of autoantibody reactivities, our results demonstrate a unique autoreactive profile in each analyzed healthy individual. The need and interest for broad-ranged and high-resolution molecular profiling of healthy individuals is rising. We have here generated and assessed an initial perspective on the global distribution of the self-reactive IgG repertoire in healthy individuals, by investigating 193 well-characterized healthy individuals.

  • 5. Notarnicola, A.
    et al.
    Hellstrom, C.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, C.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Andersson, E.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Idborg, H.
    Jemseby, E.
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Jakobsson, P-J
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, I. E.
    NEW AUTOIMMUNE TARGETS IN IDIOPATHIC INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES - AN ANTIGEN BEAD ARRAY APPROACH2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, p. 626-626Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Solomon, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity proteomics discovers decreased levels of AMFR in plasma from Osteoporosis patients2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 681-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Affinity proteomic approaches by antibody bead arrays enable multiplexed analysis of proteins in body fluids. In the presented study, we investigated blood plasma within osteoporosis to discovery differential protein profiles and to propose novel biomarkers candidates for subsequent studies. Experimental design: Starting with 4608 antibodies and plasma samples from 22 women for an untargeted screening, a set of 72 proteins were suggested for further analysis. Complementing these with targets from literature and other studies, a targeted bead array of 180 antibodies was built to profile for 92 proteins in plasma samples of 180 women from two independent population-based studies. Results: Differential profiles between osteoporosis patients and matched controls were discovered for 12 proteins in at least one of the two study sets. Among these targets, the levels of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) were concordantly lower in plasma of female osteoporosis patients. Subsequently, verification of anti-AMFR antibody selectivity was conducted using high-density peptide and protein arrays, and Western blotting. Conclusions and clinical relevance: Further validation in additional study sets will be needed to determine the clinical value of the observed decrease in AMFR plasma levels in osteoporosis patients, but AMFR may aid our understanding of disease mechanisms and could support existing tools for diagnosis and monitoring of patient mobility within osteoporosis.

  • 7.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    High-density antigen microarrays for the assessment of antibody selectivity and off-target binding2018In: Epitope Mapping Protocols, Humana Press Inc. , 2018, p. 231-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing availability of collections of antibodies, their evaluation in terms of binding selectivity becomes an important but challenging task. Planar antigen microarrays are very suitable tools to address this task and provide a powerful proteomics platform for the characterization of the binding selectivity of antibodies toward thousands of antigens in parallel. In this chapter, we describe our in-house developed procedures for the generation of high-density planar antigen microarrays with over 21,000 features. We also provide the details of the assay protocol, which we routinely use for the assessment of binding selectivity of the polyclonal antibodies generated within the Human Protein Atlas. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018.

  • 8.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling2016In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 582-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt (TM) Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt (TM) Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions.

  • 9.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zhu, Heng
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ayoglu, Brucu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profilingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
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Cite
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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