Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Sui, Fangfei
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Fundamental models and testing of creep in copper2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many sustainable technologies for energy production, for example, generation IV nuclear system, demand the use of materials operating at elevated temperatures for long duration of up to 60 years. Requirements that are even more stringent are found for creep exposed copper canisters for disposal of spent nuclear waste. The canisters should stay intact for thousands of years. Traditional design procedures that involve empirical extrapolation of creep data are no longer reliable for such extended times. Instead physically based material models have to be used.

    The final stage of creep before rupture, tertiary creep has been handled with empirical methods with adjustable parameters in the past, which makes it difficult to safely identify the controlling mechanisms. A physically based model has been developed for copper taking the substructure, cavitation and necking into account.

    To improve the understanding of the important contribution from particles to the creep strength an earlier formulated model has analyzed and further developed. The model has successfully been able to describe the temperature and stress dependence of precipitation hardening for copper-cobalt alloys, where this contribution totally dominates the creep strength.

    Multiaxial stress states are crucial for practically all high temperature applications. Fundamental material models have been extended for such conditions. These models have been compared with strain and stress controlled tests for notched specimens that have been performed.

  • 2.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Basic modelling of tertiary creep of copper2018In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 53, no 9, p. 6850-6863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms that are associated with acceleration of the creep rate in the tertiary stage such as microstructure degradation, cavitation, necking instability and recovery have been known for a long time. Numerous empirical models for tertiary creep exist in the literature, not least to describe the development of creep damage, which is vital for understanding creep rupture. Unfortunately, these models almost invariably involve parameters that are not accurately known and have to be fitted to experimental data. Basic models that take all the relevant mechanisms into account which makes them predictive have been missing. Only recently, quantitative basic models have been developed for the recovery of the dislocation structure during tertiary creep and for the formation and growth of creep cavities. These models are employed in the present paper to compute the creep strain versus time curves for copper including tertiary creep without the use of any adjustable parameters. A satisfactory representation of observed tertiary creep has been achieved. In addition, the role of necking is analysed with both uniaxial and multiaxial methods.

  • 3.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Creep Strength Contribution due to Precipitation Hardening in Copper-Cobalt AlloysManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Creep strength contribution due to precipitation hardening in copper-cobalt alloys2019In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 1819-1830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of its huge technical significance, there does not seem to be consensus about how to model the precipitation contribution to the creep strength. Most contributions in the literature are based on a constant internal stress (also called back stress or threshold stress) from the precipitation. It is well-known and it will also be demonstrated in the paper that this assumption is at variance with observations except for some ODS alloys. There is, however, one model developed by Eliasson et al. (Key Eng Mater 171-174:277-284, 2000) that seems to be able to represent experimental data without the use of any adjustable parameters. It has successfully been applied to describe the creep strength of austenitic stainless steels. Due to the fact that various mechanisms contribute to the creep strength in these steels, the model has not been fully verified. The purpose of this paper is to apply the model to published creep data for Cu-Co alloys, where the precipitation totally dominates the strength contribution to validate the model. In the paper, it is demonstrated that the model can indeed describe the influence of applied stress, alloy composition and heat treatment for the three analysed Cu-Co alloys.

  • 5.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Fundamental Modelling of Mechanisms Contributing to Tertiary Creep in Copper AT 215 and 250°C2018In: Proceedings of the ASME 2018 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive creep tests have been performed on oxygen free copper with 50 ppm phosphorus at both low and high temperatures. It is the candidate material for storage of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. Basic models without fitting parameters have been formulated to reproduce primary and secondary creep. For a long time, only empirical models existed for fitting of tertiary creep. To understand the role of creep damage, including recovery, cavitation and necking, basic models that do not involve adjustable parameters are in urgent demand. Only recently, basic models taking the relevant mechanisms into account have been developed. These models were used to predict the tertiary creep for copper at 75°C. The modelled results were compared with experimental creep curves and good agreement has been found. In the present paper, the models are applied to creep tests at higher temperatures (215 and 250°C). A similar representation with good accuracy is obtained. This demonstrates that the fundamental model for back stress is applicable for the higher temperature tests as well. 

  • 6.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Slow strain rate tensile tests on notched specimens of copper2016In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 663, p. 108-115Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, slow strain rate tensile tests have been performed on phosphorus alloyed copper under uniaxial and multiaxial stress states at 75 and 125 °C with two strain rates 10-6 and 10-7 s-1. Multiaxial stress states have been introduced by incorporating three different notch geometries on the uniaxial specimens. It has shown that the presence of the notches decreased the strength and ductility of copper. Ductility exhaustion was likely to be the dominant rupture mechanism. Finite element analysis was conducted to compare with the experimental results with a physically based model for stress strain flow curves without fitting parameters. The model could successfully describe the experimental data, and it could predict the dependence of acuity, temperature and strain rate in the multiaxial tests.

  • 7.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Wu, Rui
    Creep Tests on Notched Specimens of Copper2018Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Sui, Fangfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Technology.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Brinell Centre - Inorganic Interfacial Engineering, BRIIE.
    Wu, Rui
    Swerea KIMAB, Drottning Kristinas Vag 38, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Creep tests on notched specimens of copper2018In: Journal of Nuclear Materials, ISSN 0022-3115, E-ISSN 1873-4820, Vol. 509, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed off by placing it in canisters which are made of oxygen free copper alloyed with 50 ppm phosphorus. The canisters are expected to stay intact for thousands of years. During the long term disposal, the canisters will be exposed to mechanical pressure from the surroundings at temperatures up to 100 degrees C and this will result in creep. To investigate the role of the complex stress conditions on the canisters, creep tests under multiaxial stress state are needed. In the present work, creep tests under multiaxial stress state with three different notch profiles (acuity 0.5, 2, and 5, respectively) at 75 degrees C with net section stresses ranging from 170 MPa to 245 MPa have been performed. To interpret the experimental results, finite element computations have been conducted. With the help of the reference stress, the rupture lifetime in the multiaxial tests was estimated. The prediction was more precise for the higher acuities than for the lower one. In order to predict the creep deformation of the canisters for the long service period, fundamental creep models are considered. Previously developed basic models are used to compute the creep deformation in the multiaxial tests. Although the scatter is large, the agreement with the experiments is considered as acceptable, indicating that the basic models which have been successfully developed for uniaxial creep tests can also be used to describe multiaxial creep tests. Notch strengthening was observed for copper.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf