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  • 1.
    Ananthakrishnan, Gopal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Detecting confusable phoneme pairs for Swedish language learners depending on their first language2011In: TMH-QPSR, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 89-92Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a paradigm where commonly made segmental pronunciation errors are modeled as pair-wise confusions between two or more phonemes in the language that is being learnt. The method uses an ensemble of support vector machine classifiers with time varying Mel frequency cepstral features to distinguish between several pairs of phonemes. These classifiers are then applied to classify the phonemes uttered by second language learners. Using this method, an assessment is made regarding the typical pronunciation problems that students learning Swedish would encounter, depending on their first language.

  • 2.
    Ananthakrishnan, Gopal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Abdou, Sherif
    Faculty of Computers & Information, Cairo University, Egypt.
    Using an Ensemble of Classifiers for Mispronunciation Feedback2011In: Proceedings of SLaTE / [ed] Strik, H.; Delmonte, R.; Russel, M., Venice, Italy, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a paradigm where commonly made segmental pronunciation errors are modeled as pair-wise confusions between two or more phonemes in the language that is being learnt. The method uses an ensemble of support vector machine classifiers with time varying Mel frequency cepstral features to distinguish between several pairs of phonemes. These classifiers are then applied to classify the phonemes uttered by second language learners. Instead of providing feedback at every mispronounced phoneme, the method attempts toprovide feedback about typical mispronunciations by a certain student, over an entire session of several utterances. Two case studies that demonstrate how the paradigm is applied to provide suitable feedback to two students is also described in this pape

  • 3.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Visualization of speech and audio for hearing-impaired persons2008In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 97-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech and sounds are important sources of information in our everyday lives for communication with our environment, be it interacting with fellow humans or directing our attention to technical devices with sound signals. For hearing impaired persons this acoustic information must be supplemented or even replaced by cues using other senses. We believe that the most natural modality to use is the visual, since speech is fundamentally audiovisual and these two modalities are complementary. We are hence exploring how different visualization methods for speech and audio signals may support hearing impaired persons. The goal in this line of research is to allow the growing number of hearing impaired persons, children as well as the middle-aged and elderly, equal participation in communication. A number of visualization techniques are proposed and exemplified with applications for hearing impaired persons.

  • 4. Brusk, J.
    et al.
    Lager, T.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    DEAL – Dialogue Management in SCXML for Believable Game Characters2007In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Future Play, Future Play '07, 2007, p. 137-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order for game characters to be believable, they must appear to possess qualities such as emotions, the ability to learn and adapt as well as being able to communicate in natural language. With this paper we aim to contribute to the development of believable non-player characters (NPCs) in games, by presenting a method for managing NPC dialogues. We have selected the trade scenario as an example setting since it offers a well-known and limited domain common in games that support ownership, such as role-playing games. We have developed a dialogue manager in State Chart XML, a newly introduced W3C standard, as part of DEAL -- a research platform for exploring the challenges and potential benefits of combining elements from computer games, dialogue systems and language learning.

  • 5.
    Engwall, Olov
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Are real tongue movements easier to speech read than synthesized?2009In: INTERSPEECH 2009: 10TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2009, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2009, p. 824-827Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech perception studies with augmented reality displays in talking heads have shown that tongue reading abilities are weak initially, but that subjects become able to extract some information from intra-oral visualizations after a short training session. In this study, we investigate how the nature of the tongue movements influences the results, by comparing synthetic rule-based and actual, measured movements. The subjects were significantly better at perceiving sentences accompanied by real movements, indicating that the current coarticulation model developed for facial movements is not optimal for the tongue.

  • 6.
    Engwall, Olov
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Can you tell if tongue movements are real or synthetic?2009In: Proceedings of AVSP, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated if subjects are aware of what natural tongue movements look like, by showing them animations based on either measurements or rule-based synthesis. The issue is of interest since a previous audiovisual speech perception study recently showed that the word recognition rate in sentences with degraded audio was significantly better with real tongue movements than with synthesized. The subjects in the current study could as a group not tell which movements were real, with a classification score at chance level. About half of the subjects were significantly better at discriminating between the two types of animations, but their classification score was as often well below chance as above. The correlation between classification score and word recognition rate for subjects who also participated in the perception study was very weak, suggesting that the higher recognition score for real tongue movements may be due to subconscious, rather than conscious, processes. This finding could potentially be interpreted as an indication that audiovisual speech perception is based onarticulatory gestures.

  • 7.
    Engwall, Olov
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Real vs. rule-generated tongue movements as an audio-visual speech perception support2009In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2009 / [ed] Peter Branderud, Hartmut Traunmüller, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2009, p. 30-35Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have conducted two studies in which animations created from real tongue movements and rule-based synthesis are compared. We first studied if the two types of animations were different in terms of how much support they give in a perception task. Subjects achieved a significantly higher word recognition rate insentences when animations were shown compared to the audio only condition, and a significantly higher score with real movements than with synthesized. We then performed a classification test, in which subjects should indicate if the animations were created from measurements or from rules. The results show that the subjects as a group are unable to tell if the tongue movements are real or not. The stronger support from real movements hence appears to be due to subconscious factors.

  • 8.
    Engwall, Olov
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Design strategies for a virtual language tutor2004In: INTERSPEECH 2004, ICSLP, 8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, Jeju Island, Korea, October 4-8, 2004 / [ed] Kim, S. H.; Young, D. H., Jeju Island, Korea, 2004, p. 1693-1696Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss work in progress on an interactive talking agent as a virtual language tutor in CALL applications. The ambition is to create a tutor that can be engaged in many aspects of language learning from detailed pronunciation to conversational training. Some of the crucial components of such a system is described. An initial implementation of a stress/quantity training scheme will be presented.

  • 9.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Brusk, J.
    Dealing with DEAL: a dialogue system for conversation training2007In: Computational linguistics - Association for Computational Linguistics (Print), ISSN 0891-2017, E-ISSN 1530-9312, p. 132-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present DEAL, a spoken dialogue system for conversation training under development at KTH.DEAL is a game with a spoken language interface designed for second language learners. The system is intended as a multidisciplinary research platform where challenges and potential benefits of combining elements from computer games, dialogue systems and language learning can be explored.

  • 10. Husby, O.
    et al.
    Øvregaard, Å.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Bech, Ø.
    Albertsen, E.
    Nefzaoui, S.
    Skarpnes, E.
    Koreman, J.
    Dealing with L1 background and L2 dialects in Norwegian CAPT2011In: Proceedings of ISCA International Workshop on Speech and Language Technology in Education, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the CALST project, in which the primary aim is to develop Ville-N, a CAPT system for learners of Norwegian as a second language. Since there is no accepted pronunciation standard in Norwegian, the system uses four dialects (represented by one male and one female speaker each). Ville-N makes use of L1-L2map, a tool for multi-lingual contrastive analysis, to generate a list of expected pronunciation problems. These can be used to tailor pronunciation and listening exercises. The tool can also be used for other target languages. We propose L1-L2map as a collaborative tool for the CAPT community. Index Terms. CAPT, Ville-N, Norwegian, dialects, multi-lingual contrastive analysis, L1-L2map

  • 11. Koreman, J.
    et al.
    Bech, Ø.
    Husby, O.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    L1-L2map: a tool for multi-lingual contrastive analysis2011In: Proceedings of the 17th Int. Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS2011), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article describes the development of L1-L2map, a multi-lingual contrastive analysis tool. It uses the phoneme inventories of a large number of languages, but also contains more detailed phonetic information. An example of this is the information about the syllable positions in which the sounds can occur in a given language, which is very useful for computer-assisted pronunciation training (CAPT). The tool is available through a wiki and can be extended to include new languages. The result from contrastive analysis is used in CAPT to guide language learners through pronunciation exercises depending on their native language.

  • 12.
    Nordenberg, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Svanfeldt, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Artificial gaze. Perception experiment of eye gaze in synthetic face2005In: Proceedings from the Second Nordic Conference on Multimodal Communication, 2005, p. 257-272Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate people's sensitivity to directional eye gaze, with the longterm goal of improving the naturalness of animated agents. Previous research within psychology have proven the importance of the gaze in social interactions, and should therefore be vital to implement in virtual agents . In order to test whether we have the appropriate parameters needed to correctly control gaze in the talking head, and to evaluate users' sensitivity to these parameters, a perception experiment was performed. The results show that it is possible to achieve a state where the subjects perceive that the agent looks them in the eyes, although it did not always occur when we had expected.

  • 13.
    Picard, Sebastien
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Ananthakrishnan, Gopal
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Abdou, S.
    Detection of Specific Mispronunciations using Audiovisual Features2010In: Auditory-Visual Speech Processing (AVSP) 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a general approach for binaryclassification of audiovisual data. The intended application ismispronunciation detection for specific phonemic errors, usingvery sparse training data. The system uses a Support VectorMachine (SVM) classifier with features obtained from a TimeVarying Discrete Cosine Transform (TV-DCT) on the audiolog-spectrum as well as on the image sequences. Theconcatenated feature vectors from both the modalities werereduced to a very small subset using a combination of featureselection methods. We achieved 95-100% correctclassification for each pair-wise classifier on a database ofSwedish vowels with an average of 58 instances per vowel fortraining. The performance was largely unaffected when testedon data from a speaker who was not included in the training.

  • 14.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Designing a virtual language tutor2004In: Proc of The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, Fonetik 2004, 2004, p. 136-139Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper gives an overview of some of the choices that have been considered in the process of designing a virtual language tutor, and the direction we have decided to take based on these choices.

  • 15.
    Wik, Preben
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    The Virtual Language Teacher: Models and applications for language learning using embodied conversational agents2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents a framework for computer assisted language learning using a virtual language teacher. It is an attempt at creating, not only a new type of language learning software, but also a server-based application that collects large amounts of speech material for future research purposes.The motivation for the framework is to create a research platform for computer assisted language learning, and computer assisted pronunciation training.Within the thesis, different feedback strategies and pronunciation error detectors are exploredThis is a broad, interdisciplinary approach, combining research from a number of scientific disciplines, such as speech-technology, game studies, cognitive science, phonetics, phonology, and second-language acquisition and teaching methodologies.The thesis discusses the paradigm both from a top-down point of view, where a number of functionally separate but interacting units are presented as part of a proposed architecture, and bottom-up by demonstrating and testing an implementation of the framework.

  • 16.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Can visualization of internal articulators support speech perception?2008In: INTERSPEECH 2008: 9TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2008, VOLS 1-5, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2008, p. 2627-2630Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the contribution to speech perception given by animations of intra-oral articulations. 18 subjects were asked to identify the words in acoustically degraded sentences in three different presentation modes: acoustic signal only, audiovisual with a front view of a synthetic face and an audiovisual with both front face view and a side view, where tongue movements were visible by making parts of the cheek transparent. The augmented reality side-view did not help subjects perform better overall than with the front view only, but it seems to have been beneficial for the perception of palatal plosives, liquids and rhotics, especially in clusters. The results indicate that it cannot be expected that intra-oral animations support speech perception in general, but that information on some articulatory features can be extracted. Animations of tongue movements have hence more potential for use in computer-assisted pronunciation and perception training than as a communication aid for the hearing-impaired.

  • 17.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Looking at tongues – can it help in speech perception?2008In: Proceedings The XXIst Swedish Phonetics Conference, FONETIK 2008, 2008, p. 57-60Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the contribution to speech perception given by animations of intra-oral articulations. 18 subjects were asked to identify the words in acoustically degraded sentences in three different presentation modes: acoustic signal only, audiovisual with a front view of a synthetic face and an audiovisual with both front face view and a side view, where tongue movements were visible by making parts of the cheek transparent. The augmented reality sideview did not help subjects perform better overall than with the front view only, but it seems to have been beneficial for the perception of palatal plosives, liquids and rhotics, especially in clusters.

  • 18.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Att lära sig språk med en virtuell lärare2007In: Från Vision till praktik, språkutbildning och informationsteknik / [ed] Patrik Svensson, Härnösand: Myndigheten för nätverk och samarbete inom högre utbildning , 2007, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Simicry: A mimicry-feedback loop for second language learning2010In: Proceedings of Second Language Studies: Acquisition, Learning, Education and Technology, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the concept of Simicry, defined as similarityof mimicry, for the purpose of second language acquisition.We apply this method using a computer assisted languagelearning system called Ville on foreign students learningSwedish. The system deploys acoustic similarity measures betweennative and non-native pronunciation, derived from durationsyllabicity and pitch. The system uses these measures togive pronunciation feedback in a mimicry-feedback loop exercisewhich has two variants: a ’say after me’ mimicry exercise,and a ’shadow with me’ exercise.The answers of questionnaires filled out by students afterseveral training sessions spread over a month, show that thelearning and practicing procedure has a promising potential beingvery useful and fun.

  • 20.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Hirschberg, Julia
    Department of Computer Science, Columbia University, USA.
    Responses to Ville: A virtual language teacher for Swedish2009In: Proc. of SLaTE Workshop on Speech and Language Technology in Education, Wroxall, England, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of novel capabilities have been designed to extend the repertoire of Ville, a virtual language teacher for Swedish, created at the Centre for Speech technology at KTH. These capabilities were tested by twenty-seven language students at KTH. This paper reports on qualitative surveys and quantitative performance from these sessions which suggest some general lessons for automated language training.

  • 21.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Embodied conversational agents in computer assisted language learning2009In: Speech Communication, ISSN 0167-6393, E-ISSN 1872-7182, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 1024-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes two systems using embodied conversational agents (ECAs) for language learning. The first system, called Ville, is a virtual language teacher for vocabulary and pronunciation training. The second system, a dialogue system called DEAL, is a role-playing game for practicing conversational skills. Whereas DEAL acts as a conversational partner with the objective of creating and keeping an interesting dialogue, Ville takes the role of a teacher who guides, encourages and gives feedback to the students.

  • 22.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Brusk, J.
    Computer Assisted Conversation Training for Second Language Learners2007In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2007, 2007, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 57-60Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes work in progress on DEAL, a spoken dialogue system under development at KTH. It is intended as a platform for exploring the challenges and potential benefits of combining elements from computer games, dialogue systems and language learning.

  • 23.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Brusk, J.
    DEAL A Serious Game For CALL Practicing Conversational Skills In The Trade Domain2007In: Proceedings of SLATE 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes work in progress on DEAL, a spoken dialogue system under development at KTH. It is intended as a platform for exploring the challenges and potential benefits of combining elements from computer games, dialogue systems and language learning.

  • 24.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Husby, O.
    Øvregaard, Å.
    Bech, Ø.
    Albertsen, E.
    Nefzaoui, S.
    Skarpnes, E.
    Koreman, J.
    Contrastive analysis through L1-L2map2011In: TMH-QPSR, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 49-52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the CALST project, in which the primary aim is to developVille-N, a computer assisted pronunciation training (CAPT) system for learners ofNorwegian as a second language. Ville-N makes use of L1-L2map, a tool for multilingualcontrastive analysis, to generate a list of language-specific features. Thesecan be used to tailor pronunciation and listening exercises. The tool can also beused for other target languages.

  • 25.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Lucas Escribano, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Say ‘Aaaaa’ Interactive Vowel Practice for Second Language Learning2009In: Proc. of SLaTE Workshop on Speech and Language Technology in Education, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a system created to help language students learn the vowel inventory of Swedish. Formants are tracked, and a 3D ball moves over a vowel-chart canvas in real time. Target spheres are placed at the target values of vowels, and the students’ task is to get the target spheres. A calibration process of capturing data from three cardinal vowels is used to normalize the effects of different size vocal tract, thus making it possible for people to use the program, regardless of age, size, or gender. A third formant is used in addition to the first and second formant, to distinguish the difference between two Swedish vowels.

  • 26.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Nygaard, Lars
    Fjeld, Ruth Vatvedt
    Managing complex and multilingual lexical data with a simple editor2004In: Proceedings of the Eleventh EURALEX International Congress, Lorient, France, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an editor for compiling a multilingual machine readable lexicon, like the Simple-lexicon. This editor has proven to be a useful tool in linking several languages in one lexical database, and to edit the entries in a consistent and convenient way. The editor has been designed for linking Danish, Swedish and Norwegian in the Simple Scan-project, but might easily be extended to include all the languages in the Simple project. The editor may also be modified for similar machine readable lexical projects. 1.

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