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  • 1.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Dryout of BWR fuel elements2006In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants, ICAPP'06, 2006, p. 1616-1618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase the power output of the presently operating power reactors is a worldwide trend. One limiting factor from the safety and commercial point of views is the maximum allowable thermal load of the fuel. The findings of the presented loop experiments are that the margin to the burnout of the fuel elements can be defined by a single parameter the void.

  • 2.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    HIGH PRESSURE BOILING WATER REACTOR2010In: Nuclear Technology, ISSN 0029-5450, E-ISSN 1943-7471, Vol. 172, no 2, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some 400 boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have been in operation for several decades. The presented concept, the high pressure boiling water reactor (HP-BWR), combines the best parts and omits the troublesome components of traditional BWRs and PWRs by taking into consideration the experiences gained during their operation. One of the major benefits of the HP-BWR is that safety is improved. The design utilizes gravity-operated control rods, and there is a large space for the cross-formed control rods between fuel boxes. The bottom of the reactor vessel is smooth and without penetrations. All the pipe connections to the reactor vessel are well above the top of the reactor core, and core spray is not needed. Additionally, internal circulation pumps are used. The HP-BWR concept is also environmentally friendly: Improved thermal efficiency is achieved by feeding the turbine with similar to 340 degrees C (15 MPa) steam instead of similar to 285 degrees C (7 MPa), and there is less warm water release to the recipient and less uranium consumption per produced kWh, resulting in the production of less waste. Finally, the HP-BWR is cost effective and simple, operating in direct cycle mode with no need for complicated steam generators. Moisture separators and steam dryers are placed inside the reactor vessel, and additional separators and dryers can be installed inside or outside the containment. Well-proved simple dry containment or wet containment can be used. In more than half a century, an extensive regulatory licensing experience has been built from traditional BWRs and PWRs. The HP-BWR is a developed, high-performance successor of those conventional designs. Therefore, it can be expected that licensing can be accomplished in a reasonable time. Several utilities are supporting manufacturers to study concepts for future reactors. It is likely that an application to one or more electrical power companies for financial support by a manufacturer to make a detailed feasibility study of the HP-BWR would be positively treated. This could be the next step to the implementation of the HP-BWR.

  • 3.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    High Pressure Boiling Water Reactor: HP-BWR2010In: ATW. Internationale Zeitschrift für Kernenergie, ISSN 1431-5254, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 107-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some 400 Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) have been in operation for several decades. The presented concept, the High Pressure Boiling Water Reactor (HP-BWR) makes use of the operating experiences. HP-BWR combines the advantages and leaves out the disadvantages of the traditional BWRs and PWRs by taking in consideration the experiences gained during their operation. The best parts of the two traditional reactor types are used and the troublesome components are left out. HP-BWR major benefits are;

    1. Safety is improved; -Gravity operated control rods -Large space for the cross formed control rods between fuel boxes -Bottom of the reactor vessel is smooth and is without penetrations -All the pipe connections to the reactor vessel are well above the top of the reactor core -Core spray is not needed -Internal circulation pumps are used

    2. Environment friendly; -Improved thermal efficiency, feeding the turbine with similar to 340 degrees C (15 MPa) steam instead of similar to 285 degrees C (7MPa) -Less warm water release to the recipient and less uranium consumption per produced kWh and consequently less waste is produced

    3. Cost effective, simple; -Direct cycle, no need for complicated steam generators -Moisture separators and steam dryers are inside the reactor vessel and additional separators and dryers can be installed inside or outside the containment Well proved simple dry containment or wet containment can be used.

  • 4.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Neutron kinetics of the Chernobyl accident2006In: ATW. Internationale Zeitschrift für Kernenergie, ISSN 1431-5254, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 254-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical reactor kinetic equations with six groups of delayed neutrons are not solved analytically. Here they are solved numerically with MATLAB and applied to the Chernobyl accident. The results are presented graphically. Now, 20 years after the accident it is important for today's and tomorrow's generations of nuclear engineers to learn not to design reactors with runaway characteristics which can cause an avalanche like power excursion . The Chernobyl type of reactor has a positive void coefficient, which means that when a part of the water is replaced by steam the power will increase. At the Chernobyl experiment the steam content in the coolant channels increased suddenly causing a catastrophic power excursion. The presented analyses gives details about the importance of the magnitude of the void coefficient. Also the delayed neutrons behaviour is described.

  • 5.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Past, present and future: View over the Baltic2006In: Nuclear Engineering International, ISSN 0029-5507, Vol. 51, no 620, p. 47-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cherbonyl accident was first identified outside the Soviet Union by experts in Sweden, and it is the most supportive country in the west for continued operation of RBMK units. The easterly wind blew in the radioactivity from a nuclear accident and the researchers immediate conclusion was that a major reactor accident happened east of the Baltic sea. The isotopes analyzed by a research laboratory in Stockholm indicated that no ship reactor was involved. Swedish heavy industries formed a power company named Basel for its supplies towards the other side of the Baltic sea, where many different thermal power plants are located.

  • 6.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    PWR plus BWR The best of both2009In: Nuclear Engineering International, ISSN 0029-5507, Vol. 54, no 656, p. 32-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The High Pressure Boiling Water Reactor (HP-BWR), based on operating experience with conventional BWRs and PWRs, avoids various problematic components of the traditional reactor design. The HP-BWR design relies on proven components such as the pressure vessel and the control rod drive systems from the PWR, and the core internals, circulation pumps, and steam-moisture separators from the BWR. Internal circulation pumps are used in the HP-BWR to assure hydrodynamic stability and the orifices at the fuel channel inlets are chosen so that the one phase pressure drop dominates over the two-phase pressure drop, avoiding hydrodynamic oscillations. The improved thermal efficiency is achieved by feeding the turbine with 618K steam, while the HP-BWR efficiency would increase to approximately 37% compared with 33% for the conventional BWRs.

  • 7.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Smart grids at a nuclear power plant: ensuring power supply for priority consumers with islanding controlled by symmetrical components2010In: ATW. Internationale Zeitschrift für Kernenergie, ISSN 1431-5254, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 694-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a 3-phase system, when a short circuit between 2 lines or a single or 2 lines to earth occurs, 3 types of currents are immediately produced: positive, negative and 0 sequence. Using these signals, less priority consumers can be disconnected from the grid and the power of the nuclear reactor, which supplies all consumers, can be diverted to supply priority consumers, although with only a couple of cycle times due to dwindling amplitude. This is an example of an island operation with a nuclear power reactor and prioritised consumers connected via a smart grid.

  • 8.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Upgrading control rooms2004In: Nuclear Engineering International, ISSN 0029-5507, Vol. 49, no 595, p. 39-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projects at Oskarshamn 1 and Ringhals 2 in Sweden involve a large-scale modernization of electrical and instrumentation and control equipment. These projects have had, or will have, a significant impact on the design of the control tools.

  • 9.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Kristensson, D
    In control of radwaste2004In: Nuclear Engineering International, ISSN 0029-5507, Vol. 49, no 604, p. 22-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Reisch, Frigyes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Tinoco, Hernan
    Concept of a high pressure boiling water reactor, HP-BWR2009In: ICONE 17: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUCLEAR ENGINEERING, VOL 1, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2009, p. 787-792Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some four hundred Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) have been in operation for several decades. The presented concept, the High Pressure Boiling Water Reactor (HP-BWR) makes use of the operating experiences. HP-BWR combines the advantages and leaves out the disadvantages of the traditional BWRs and PWRs by taking in consideration the experiences gained during their operation. The best parts of the two traditional reactor types are used and the troublesome components arc left out HP-BWR major benefits; 1. Safety is improved; -Gravity operated control rods -Large space for the cross formed control rods between fuel boxes Bottom of the reactor vessel without numerous control rod penetrations -All the pipe connections to the reactor vessel are well above the top of the reactor core -Core spray is not needed -Internal circulation pumps are used 2. Environment friendly; -Improved thermal efficiency, feeding the turbine with similar to 340 degrees C (15 MPa) steam instead of similar to 285 degrees C (7MPa) -Less warm water release to the recipient and less uranium consumption per produced kWh and consequently less waste is produced 3. Cost effective, simple; -Direct cycle, no need for complicated steam generators -Steam separators inside the reactor vessel, and steam dryers together with additional separators can be installed inside or outside the containment Simple dry containment.

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