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  • 1.
    Gasch, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Facciolo, Luca
    Vattenfall R&D.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Malm, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Seismic analyses of nuclear facilities with interaction between structure and water: Comparison between methods to account for Fluid-Structure-Interaction (FSI)2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods to describe the interaction between fluids and solids has been one of the biggest focus points for the research within the field of computationalengineering for the recent years. This area is of interest to a variety ofengineering problems, ranging from flow in blood vessels, aerodynamics andof course the interaction between water and civil engineering structures. Thetypical civil engineering application of fluid-structure interaction (FSI)encountered in a nuclear facilities is obtained at seismic loading, where the nuclear facilities consists of water filled pools of various sizes, for example the spent fuel and condensation pools. These water filled pools contribute with added mass to the structure, which lowers the natural frequency of thestructure as well as hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure that acts on thewalls of the pool due to wave propagation in the fluid. In addition, as the pools also have a free water surface towards the environment of thestructure, free surface wave propagation also has to be accounted for; i.e.sloshing. This introduces extra non-linearity to the problem, since a freesurface constitutes a boundary condition with an unknown location.

    The main part of this report constitutes as a state-of-the-art summary whereconcepts important for FSI analyses are presented and important differencesare discussed. Due to the different interests of the numerous disciplinesengaged in this research area, a large number of methods have been developed, where each has different strengths and weaknesses suited for the problem in mind when developing the method. The focus of this report havebeen to describe the most important numerical techniques and the categories of methods that or of most interest for civil engineering problems, such as simplified analytical or mass-spring models, Acoustic Elements, ArbitraryLagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) and coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian (CEL).

    Thereafter two benchmark examples are presented, intended to highlightdifferences between the different methods. In the first study, sloshing of aliquid tank is studied where the numerical methods are compared toexperimental results, regarding the movement of the free water surface. In addition, the hydrodynamic (fluid) pressures on the walls of the tanks arecompared between the different numerical methods. It was shown that mostanalysis methods give accurate results for the sloshing wave height whencompared with the experimental data. It should however be mentioned that the tank was only excited by a simple harmonic motion with a frequency thatdo not give rise to any resonance waves in the water body.

    Also when it comes to fluid pressure good agreement between the differentanalysis methods was found, although no experimental data was available forthis parameter. It was also noticed that for the sloshing tank, most of the change in pressure occurred close to the free surface of the water, which indicates that it mainly consists of a convective pressure, i.e. from the sloshing. Thereby, finite element programs that account the impulsive mass incivil engineering FSI problems should not be used for this type of analysis. In the second study, the numerical methods are compared based on differenttypes of seismic input, such as a large earthquake with mainly low frequencycontent typically like an earthquake on the US west coast and one smallerearthquake with relatively higher degree of high frequency content typicallylike a Swedish type of earthquake. One important observation was that the relative increase in induced stresses in the structure, with and withoutconsideration of the water was significantly larger for the Swedish earthquakethan for the US earthquake. One possible reason for this may be that the Swedish earthquake is not large enough to excite the relatively stiff structurewithout any water, but it will induce significant dynamic effects in the waterwhich give rise to higher stresses in the concrete as well. However, this shows that it is very important to include water in seismic analyses.

  • 2.
    Malm, Richard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Pi Rito, Camilo
    SWECO Infrastructure.
    Hassanzadeh, Manouchehr
    Vattenfall Engineering.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Gasch, Tobias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Concrete arch dam at seismic loading with fluid structure interaction2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A concrete arch dam have been analyzed during seismic loading with a model based on acoustic elements to describe the water and infinite elements as quiet boundaries to prevent wave reflection. The results have also been compared with a simplified model based on Westergaards added mass approach. The simplified model is only used, in this study, for comparison with the more advanced model with acoustic elements. Therefore the results from this simplified model are just used as a rough estimate of the induced stresses and displacements. Despite this, the simplified Westergaard model gives similar results compared to the more advanced model with acoustic elements for the water and infinite elements for the boundaries. The largest difference between the models often occurs at the nodes in the base of the arch dam, which may be due to poor discretization. Generally, the Westergaard added mass gives higher maximum principal stresses at the base on the upstream side than the acoustic model, while often underestimating the min principal stresses at the base on the downstream side. Both models show high tensile stresses near the base of the arch dam that would result in cracks.

  • 3.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Seismic high-frequency content loads on structures and components within nuclear facilities2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is generally considered to be a low seismicity area, but for structures within nuclear power facilities, the safety level demand with respect to seismic events are high and thus, these structures are required to be earthquake-resistant. The seismic hazard is here primarily considered to be associated with near-field earthquakes. The nuclear power plants are further founded on hard rock and the expected ground motions are dominated by high frequencies. The design earthquake considered for the nuclear facilities has an annual probability of 10-5 events, that is, the probability of occurrence is once per 100 000 years. The focus of the study is the seismic response of large concrete structures for the nuclear power industry, with regard not only to the structure itself but also to non-structural components attached to the primary structure, and with emphasis on Swedish conditions. The aim of this licentiate thesis is to summarize and demonstrate some important aspects when the seismic load is dominated by high frequencies. Additionally, an overview of laws, regulations, codes, standards, and guidelines important for seismic analysis and design of nuclear power structures is provided.

    The thesis includes two case studies investigating the effect of seismic high-frequency content loads. The first study investigates the influence of gaps in the piping supports on the response of a steel piping system subjected to a seismic load dominated by high amplitudes at high frequencies. The gaps are found in the joints of the strut supports or are gaps between the rigid box supports and the pipe. The piping system is assessed to be susceptible to high-frequency loads and is located within the reactor containment building of a nuclear power plant. The stress response of the pipe and the acceleration response of the valves are evaluated. The second study investigates the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on the response of an elevated rectangular water-containing concrete pool subjected to a seismic load with dominating low and high frequencies, respectively. The pool is located within the reactor containment building of a boiling water reactor at a nuclear power plant. The hydrodynamic pressure distribution is evaluated together with the stress distribution in the walls of the tank.

    From the two case studies, it is evident that the response due to a seismic load dominated by high frequencies and low frequencies, respectively, is different. Although the seismic high-frequency load may be considered non-damaging for the structure, the effect may not be negligible for non-structural components attached to the primary structure. Including geometrical non-linear effects such as gaps may however reduce the response. It was shown that the stress response for most of the pipe elements in the first case study was reduced due to the gaps. It may also be that the inclusion of fluid-structure interaction effects changes the dynamic properties of a structural system so that it responds significantly in the high frequency range, thus making it more vulnerable to seismic loads dominated by high frequencies. In the second case study, it was shown that even for a seismic load with small amplitudes and short duration, but with dominating high-frequency content, as the Swedish 10-5 design earthquake, the increase of the dynamic response as fluid-structure interaction is accounted for is significant.

  • 4.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Gasch, Tobias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Stresses in water filled concrete pools within nuclear facilities subjected to seismic loads2014In: Nordic Concrete Research, ISSN 0800-6377, no 51, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study on water filled pools within nuclear facilities subjected to seismic loads. The type of structure studied is an elevated rectangular concrete tank, supported by the reactor containment, which is a high cylindrical concrete structure. Seismic analysis is performed using finite element models, accounting for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the water and the concrete structure. The stresses in a concrete pool are calculated, also investigating the changes in stresses as additional cross-walls are added. The effects from earthquakes dominated by low and high frequencies are evaluated, representative for conditions at the West coast of North America and Northern Europe, respectively. It is shown that the coupled fluid-structure systems have more significant modes in the high frequency range compared to the models without water, that is, for frequencies at which the Northern European type earthquake has significant energy compared to the Western North American earthquake. The seismic analyses show that the relative increase of hydrodynamic pressure is higher when the outer walls of the pool are stiffened due to the inclusion of additional cross-walls. With the inclusion of additional cross-walls, modes with lower natural frequencies, although still relatively high, become more important for the hydrodynamic pressure response. Leading to a higher stress response in the outer walls of the pool for models including the additional cross-walls compared to models without cross-walls. The study indicates that the effect from fluid-structure interaction is of great importance also for seismic loads with relatively high-frequency content.

  • 5.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Gasch, Tobias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Facciolo, Luca
    Vattenfall Engineering.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Malm, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Interaction between structure and water in seismic analyses of nuclear facilities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate different approaches to account for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) in seismic analyses of nuclear facilities. Different methods to account for FSI, from simplified to highly advanced numerical methods, are briefly reviewed and some important concepts are discussed. A benchmark example of a simple tank sloshing problem is included to evaluate the use of different FSI methods.

    The main conclusion from the study is that it is of great significance to first of all include the effect of FSI. When considering the response of a tank subjected to a load of periodic nature, as in the benchmark example, the hydrodynamic effects are very important, since they increase the load effect on the structure. It is also observed that the simplified methods, in which the hydrodynamic effects are included as a mass-spring system, results in much higher stresses in the structure than if the fluid is included as continuum elements. However, the more advanced methods lead to extra computational time and also require more from the analyst. With the focus of this project being the global response of the structure, most methods describe the fluid unnecessarily complicated and phenomena such as splashing and turbulence are of little interest. The main aspects that influence the structure are the mass and inertia of the fluid along with the surface waves, the sloshing. Considering this, simplified methods such as elements with acoustic equations, and even mass-spring systems, to represent the fluid, often give results that are accurate enough.

  • 6.
    Rydell, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures. Vattenfall R&D.
    Malm, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Piping system subjected to seismic hard rock high frequencies2014In: Nuclear Engineering and Design, ISSN 0029-5493, E-ISSN 1872-759X, Vol. 278, p. 302-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the influence of support gaps in the analyses of a piping system when subjected to a seismic hard rock high-frequency load. The system is located within the reactor containment building of a nuclear power plant and is assessed to be susceptible to high-frequency loads. The stress response of the pipe and the acceleration response of the valves are evaluated for different support gap sizes. It is shown that the inclusion of the support gaps in the analyses reduces the stress response for almost all pipe elements. On the other hand, the acceleration response of the valves is not necessarily reduced by the consideration of the gaps.

1 - 6 of 6
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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