Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ekekrantz, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Folkesson, John
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Probabilistic Primitive Refinement algorithm for colored point cloud data2015In: 2015 European Conference on Mobile Robots (ECMR), Lincoln: IEEE conference proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we present the Probabilistic Primitive Refinement (PPR) algorithm, an iterative method for accurately determining the inliers of an estimated primitive (such as planes and spheres) parametrization in an unorganized, noisy point cloud. The measurement noise of the points belonging to the proposed primitive surface are modelled using a Gaussian distribution and the measurements of extraneous points to the proposed surface are modelled as a histogram. Given these models, the probability that a measurement originated from the proposed surface model can be computed. Our novel technique to model the noisy surface from the measurement data does not require a priori given parameters for the sensor noise model. The absence of sensitive parameters selection is a strength of our method. Using the geometric information obtained from such an estimate the algorithm then builds a color-based model for the surface, further boosting the accuracy of the segmentation. If used iteratively the PPR algorithm can be seen as a variation of the popular mean-shift algorithm with an adaptive stochastic kernel function.

  • 2.
    Kunze, Lars
    et al.
    University of Birmingham.
    Burbridge, Christopher
    University of Birmingham.
    Alberti, Marina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Folkesson, John
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Hawes, Nick
    University of Birmingham.
    Combining Top-down Spatial Reasoning and Bottom-up Object Class Recognition for Scene Understanding2014In: Proc. of 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on IntelligentRobots and Systems 2014, IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 2910-2915Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many robot perception systems are built to only consider intrinsic object features to recognise the class of an object. By integrating both top-down spatial relational reasoning and bottom-up object class recognition the overall performance of a perception system can be improved. In this paper we present a unified framework that combines a 3D object class recognition system with learned, spatial models of object relations. In robot experiments we show that our combined approach improves the classification results on real world office desks compared to pure bottom-up perception. Hence, by using spatial knowledge during object class recognition perception becomes more efficient and robust and robots can understand scenes more effectively.

  • 3. Maas, R.
    et al.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Sehr, A.
    Kellermann, W.
    An uncertainty decoding approach to noise- and reverberation-robust speech recognition2013In: ICASSP IEEE Int Conf Acoust Speech Signal Process Proc, 2013, p. 7388-7392Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generic REMOS (REverberation MOdeling for robust Speech recognition) concept is extended in this contribution to cope with additional noise components. REMOS originally embeds an explicit reverberation model into a hiddenMarkov model (HMM) leading to a relaxed conditional independence assumption for the observed feature vectors. During recognition, a nonlinear optimization problem is to be solved in order to adapt the HMMs' output probability density functions to the current reverberation conditions. The extension for additional noise components necessitates a modified numerical solver for the nonlinear optimization problem. We propose an approximation scheme based on continuous piecewise linear regression. Connected-digit recognition experiments demonstrate the potential of REMOS in reverberant and noisy environments. They furthermore reveal that the benefit of an explicit reverberation model, overcoming the conditional independence assumption, increases with increasing signal-to-noise-ratios.

  • 4.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Ambrus, Rares
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Agrawal, G.
    Del Burgo, Adria Gallart
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Ramesh, J. H.
    Jha, M. K.
    Akhil, M. B. S. S.
    Shetty, N. B.
    Folkesson, John
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    KTH-3D-TOTAL: A 3D dataset for discovering spatial structures for long-term autonomous learning2014In: 2014 13th International Conference on Control Automation Robotics and Vision, ICARCV 2014, IEEE , 2014, p. 1528-1535Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term autonomous learning of human environments entails modelling and generalizing over distinct variations in: object instances in different scenes, and different scenes with respect to space and time. It is crucial for the robot to recognize the structure and context in spatial arrangements and exploit these to learn models which capture the essence of these distinct variations. Table-tops posses a typical structure repeatedly seen in human environments and are identified by characteristics of being personal spaces of diverse functionalities and dynamically changing due to human interactions. In this paper, we present a 3D dataset of 20 office table-tops manually observed and scanned 3 times a day as regularly as possible over 19 days (461 scenes) and subsequently, manually annotated with 18 different object classes, including multiple instances. We analyse the dataset to discover spatial structures and patterns in their variations. The dataset can, for example, be used to study the spatial relations between objects and long-term environment models for applications such as activity recognition, context and functionality estimation and anomaly detection.

  • 5.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Kjellström, H.
    Probabilistic modeling of bowing gestures for gesture-based violin sound synthesis2013In: Proceedings of the Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference 2013, SMAC 13 / [ed] Roberto Bresin and Anders Askenfeldt, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013, p. 133-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Burbridge, C.
    Kunze, L.
    Alberti, Marina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Folkesson, John
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Hawes, N.
    A comparison of qualitative and metric spatial relation models for scene understanding2015In: Proceedings of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AI Access Foundation , 2015, Vol. 2, p. 1632-1640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object recognition systems can be unreliable when run in isolation depending on only image based features, but their performance can be improved when taking scene context into account. In this paper, we present techniques to model and infer object labels in real scenes based on a variety of spatial relations - geometric features which capture how objects co-occur - and compare their efficacy in the context of augmenting perception based object classification in real-world table-top scenes. We utilise a long-term dataset of office table-tops for qualitatively comparing the performances of these techniques. On this dataset, we show that more intricate techniques, have a superior performance but do not generalise well on small training data. We also show that techniques using coarser information perform crudely but sufficiently well in standalone scenarios and generalise well on small training data. We conclude the paper, expanding on the insights we have gained through these comparisons and comment on a few fundamental topics with respect to long-term autonomous robots.

  • 7.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Ek, Carl Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Inferring hand pose: A comparative study of visual shape features2013In: 2013 10th IEEE International Conference and Workshops on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, FG 2013, IEEE , 2013, p. 6553698-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand pose estimation from video is essential for a number of applications such as automatic sign language recognition and robot learning from demonstration. However, hand pose estimation is made difficult by the high degree of articulation of the hand; a realistic hand model is described with at least 35 dimensions, which means that it can assume a wide variety of poses, and there is a very high degree of self occlusion for most poses. Furthermore, different parts of the hand display very similar visual appearance; it is difficult to tell fingers apart in video. These properties of hands put hard requirements on visual features used for hand pose estimation and tracking. In this paper, we evaluate three different state-of-the-art visual shape descriptors, which are commonly used for hand and human body pose estimation. We study the nature of the mappings from the hand pose space to the feature spaces spanned by the visual descriptors, in terms of the smoothness, discriminability, and generativity of the pose-feature mappings, as well as their robustness to noise in terms of these properties. Based on this, we give recommendations on in which types of applications each visual shape descriptor is suitable.

  • 8.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Non-Parametric Spatial Context Structure Learning for Autonomous Understanding of Human Environments2017In: 2017 26TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ROBOT AND HUMAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION (RO-MAN) / [ed] Howard, A Suzuki, K Zollo, L, IEEE , 2017, p. 1317-1324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous scene understanding by object classification today, crucially depends on the accuracy of appearance based robotic perception. However, this is prone to difficulties in object detection arising from unfavourable lighting conditions and vision unfriendly object properties. In our work, we propose a spatial context based system which infers object classes utilising solely structural information captured from the scenes to aid traditional perception systems. Our system operates on novel spatial features (IFRC) that are robust to noisy object detections; It also caters to on-the-fly learned knowledge modification improving performance with practise. IFRC are aligned with human expression of 3D space, thereby facilitating easy HRI and hence simpler supervised learning. We tested our spatial context based system to successfully conclude that it can capture spatio structural information to do joint object classification to not only act as a vision aide, but sometimes even perform on par with appearance based robotic vision.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf