Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Amasia, Mary
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Asalapuram, Pavankumar
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Modified DVD-drive as an integrated microfluidic system for precipitate-based detection of LAMP assay2013In: 17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013, 2013, Vol. 3, p. 1616-1618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a sensitive method for nucleic acid analysis, and has been demonstrated as a ideal technique for use in miniaturized microfluidic systems. While LAMP assays are often detected using absorbance or fluorescence, we demonstrate an integrated system for LAMP assays through the detection of precipitate formation using a modified commercial DVD drive. This integrated DVD drive system is able to automate the sedimentation process and scattering-based detection of accumulated precipitate, as well as maintain the constant temperature needed for LAMP analysis.

  • 2.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Epitope unmasking for improved immuno-magnetic isolation of Gram-negative bacteriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Banerjee, I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform2015In: MicroTAS 2015 - 19th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society , 2015, p. 1256-1258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present "SlipDisc", a versatile sample preparation platform based on slipchip1 technology. The SlipDisc platform uses polycarbonate CDs and laser cut PSA instead of glass and a hand-winded mechanical clock mechanism to precisely manipulate minute amount of liquid. The innovative hand-winded mechanical "clockwork" that enables sample processing from one spot to another with defined precision. As a prof of principle of bioassay, we show HRP enzyme reacting with TMB substrate and a multilayer architecture used in manipulation of magnetic beads through an immiscible oil phase. Our long-term goal is to develop a sample-in-result-out multi-parametric bioanalytical SlipDisc platform specifically designed to need the needs at resource-limited settings for point of care molecular diagnostics.

  • 4.
    Faridi, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Elasto-Inertial microfluidics for bacteria separation from whole blood for sepsis diagnosticsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Faridi, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. mafaridi@kth.se.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ardabli, Sahar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elasto-inertial microfluidics for bacteria separation from whole blood for sepsis diagnostics2017In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 1477-3155, E-ISSN 1477-3155, Vol. 15, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a major challenge with high mortality rate, with an incidence that is increasing worldwide. Early treatment with appropriate therapy can reduce BSI-related morbidity and mortality. However, despite recent progress in molecular based assays, complex sample preparation steps have become critical roadblock for a greater expansion of molecular assays. Here, we report a size based, label-free, bacteria separation from whole blood using elasto-inertial microfluidics.

    Results: In elasto-inertial microfluidics, the viscoelastic flow enables size based migration of blood cells into a non- Newtonian solution, while smaller bacteria remain in the streamline of the blood sample entrance and can be sepa- rated. We first optimized the flow conditions using particles, and show continuous separation of 5 μm particles from 2 μm at a yield of 95% for 5 μm particle and 93% for 2 μm particles at respective outlets. Next, bacteria were continu- ously separated at an efficiency of 76% from undiluted whole blood sample.

    Conclusion: We demonstrate separation of bacteria from undiluted while blood using elasto-inertial microfluidics. The label-free, passive bacteria preparation method has a great potential for downstream phenotypic and molecular analysis of bacteria. 

  • 6.
    Ohlander, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bose, Indranil
    Njenda, Duncan
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neogi, Ujjwal
    Kutter, Christoph
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lab-on-foil based portable microPCR for point-of-care nucleic acid testing of HIV-1Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ohlander, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Huygens, Flavia
    Kutter, Christoph
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Staphylococcus Aureus subtyping and detection of MRSA on a microfluidic lab-on-Foil deviceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8. Ohlander, Anna
    et al.
    Zilio, Caterina
    Hammerle, Tobias
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klink, Gerhard
    Chiari, Marcella
    Bock, Karlheinz
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by melting curve analysis using thin film semi-transparent heaters integrated in a lab-on-foil system2013In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 2075-2082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent technological advances in micro/nanotechnology present new opportunities to combine microfluidics with microarray technology for the development of small, sensitive, single-use, point-of-care molecular diagnostic devices. As such, the integration of microarray and plastic microfluidic systems is an attractive low-cost alternative to glass based microarray systems. This paper presents the integration of a DNA microarray and an all-polymer microfluidic foil system with integrated thin film heaters, which demonstrate DNA analysis based on melting curve analysis (MCA). A novel micro-heater concept using semi-transparent copper heaters manufactured by roll-to-roll and lift-off on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) foil has been developed. Using a mesh structure, heater surfaces have been realized in only one single metallization step, providing more efficient and homogenous heating characteristics than conventional meander heaters. A robust DNA microarray spotting protocol was adapted on Parylene C coated heater-foils, using co-polymer poly(DMA-NAS-MAPS) to enable covalent immobilization of DNA. The heaters were integrated in a microfluidic channel using lamination foils and MCA of the spotted DNA duplexes showed single based discrimination of mismatched over matched target DNA-probes. Finally, as a proof of principle, we perform MCA on PCR products to detect the Leu7Pro polymorphism of the neutropeptide Y related to increased risk of Type II diabetes, BMI and depression.

  • 9. Pavankumar, A. R.
    et al.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, A.
    Schulte, T.
    Rajarathinam, K.
    Rebellato, P.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Salas, J.
    Achour, A.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bioanalytical advantages of a novel recombinant apyrase enzyme in ATP-based bioluminescence methods2018In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1025, p. 118-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasensitive measurements of intracellular ATP (intATP) based on the firefly luciferase reactions are frequently used to enumerate bacterial or mammalian cells. During clinical applications, extracellular ATP (extATP) should be depleted in biological samples since it interferes with intATP and affects the quantification of bacteria. The extATP can be eliminated by ATP-degrading enzymes but complete hydrolysis of extATP remains a challenge for today's commercial enzymes. The catalytic efficiency of ATP-degrading enzymes depends on enzyme characteristics, sample composition and the ability to deplete diphosphates, triphosphates and their complexes generated during the reaction. This phenomenon restricts the usage of bioluminescence-based ATP methods in clinical diagnostics. In light of this, we have developed a recombinant Shigella flexneri apyrase (RSFA) enzyme and analysed its ATP depletion potential with five commercial biochemical sources including potato apyrase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, hexokinase and glycerol kinase. The RSFA revealed superior activity by completely eliminating the extracellular ATP and ATP-complexes, even in biological samples like urine and serum. Therefore, our results can potentially unwrap the chemical and bio-analytical applications of ATP-based bioluminescence tests to develop highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics.

  • 10. Pavankumar, A.M.
    et al.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shulte, T.
    Lundin, A.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Recombinant Shigella flexneri apyrase enzyme for bioluminescence based diagnostic applicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Amasia, Mary
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    In situ isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA and bead based visualization of RCA products on an integrated lab on DVD platform for low cost molecular diagnostics2014In: 18th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2014, 2014, p. 1422-1424Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) is a simple and versatile isothermal enzymatic nucleic acid amplification techniques, and has been demonstrated as a ideal tool for biomedical research. We demonstrate for the first time the detection of padlock probes mediated and rolling circle amplification of DNA on centrifugal microfluidic system. DNA spotted on DVD substrate is amplified in-situ and novel bead-based detection of the amplified product is demonstrated using a modified commercial DVD reader for "image based" molecular diagnostics.

  • 12.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hansson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Microfluidic-based isolation of bacteria from whole blood for sepsis diagnostics2015In: Biotechnology letters, ISSN 0141-5492, E-ISSN 1573-6776, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 825-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood-stream infections (BSI) remain a major health challenge, with an increasing incidence worldwide and a high mortality rate. Early treatment with appropriate antibiotics can reduce BSI-related morbidity and mortality, but success requires rapid identification of the infecting organisms. The rapid, culture-independent diagnosis of BSI could be significantly facilitated by straightforward isolation of highly purified bacteria from whole blood. We present a microfluidic-based, sample-preparation system that rapidly and selectively lyses all blood cells while it extracts intact bacteria for downstream analysis. Whole blood is exposed to a mild detergent, which lyses most blood cells, and then to osmotic shock using deionized water, which eliminates the remaining white blood cells. The recovered bacteria are 100 % viable, which opens up possibilities for performing drug susceptibility tests and for nucleic-acid-based molecular identification.

  • 13.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Käller, M.
    Nazarov, A.
    Brismar, H.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    High density custom microarrays formed by microcompartment amplification on glass surface2014In: 18th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2014, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society , 2014, p. 1027-1029Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compartmentalization of a single DNA molecule is necessary for digital amplification. In the present study we have developed a microscale isothermal amplification using exponential rolling circle amplification (RCA). RCA was performed in PDMS microcompartments on a microarray glass, with a volume of less than 1 pL. Resulting amplicons were attached to the glass surface and formed a custom array with the density of spots above 2,5 × 105 per cm2. Our technology can be applied for digital amplification of DNA or RNA from a variety of complex biological samples in a microchip format.

  • 14.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Faridi, Muhammad Asim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Microfluidic-based bacteria isolation from whole blood for diagnostics of blood stream infection2017In: Methods in Molecular Biology: Microchip Diagnostics, Springer, 2017, p. 175-186Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial blood stream infection (BSI) potentially leads to life-threatening clinical conditions and medical emergencies such as severe sepsis, septic shock, and multi organ failure syndrome. Blood culturing is currently the gold standard for the identification of microorganisms and, although it has been automated over the decade, the process still requires 24–72 h to complete. This long turnaround time, especially for the identification of antimicrobial resistance, is driving the development of rapid molecular diagnostic methods. Rapid detection of microbial pathogens in blood related to bloodstream infections will allow the clinician to decide on or adjust the antimicrobial therapy potentially reducing the morbidity, mortality, and economic burden associated with BSI. For molecular-based methods, there is a lot to gain from an improved and straightforward method for isolation of bacteria from whole blood for downstream processing. We describe a microfluidic-based sample-preparation approach that rapidly and selectively lyses all blood cells while it extracts intact bacteria for downstream analysis. Whole blood is exposed to a mild detergent, which lyses most blood cells, and then to osmotic shock using deionized water, which eliminates the remaining white blood cells. The recovered bacteria are 100% viable, which opens up possibilities for performing drug susceptibility tests and for nucleic-acid-based molecular identification. © Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf