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  • 1.
    Azasu, Samuel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Hungria-Gunnelin, Rosane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Learning Lab IKT. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    The role of assessment in managing student diversity2010In: Journal of European Real Estate Research, ISSN 1753-9269, E-ISSN 1753-9277, ISSN 17539269, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 59-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of assessment to manage some of the challenges diversity brings into the teaching and learning in international real estate degree programs. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a multi-year case study of a course in real estate valuation in a Swedish University. The impact of assessment on student experience and performance was analyzed. Findings: Changes in the timing and rules of assessment have an appreciable impact on differences in student performance. However, some diversity problems must be addressed also at the program level. Practical implications: Real estate departments must exercise pedagogical leadership if they are to continue to effectively provide globally relevant education. Originality/value: This paper analyses one of the consequences of the expansion of international real estate education into a non-traditional destination for foreign students.

  • 2.
    Bernhard, Jonte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Learning through design-implement experiences: A literature review2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we introduce some literature relevant for design-based learning, in particular for design-implement experiences in line with CDIO Standard 5. The aim is to inform the development of such learning experiences and to indicate some areas where new research would be of relevance to educators.

  • 3. Björkqvist, Jerker
    et al.
    Edström, KristinaKTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.Hugo, Ronald J.Kontio, JuhaRoslöf, JanneSellens, RickVirtanen, Seppo
    The 12th International CDIO Conference: Proceedings, Full Papers2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Brennan, Robert
    et al.
    University of Calgary.
    Edström, KristinaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.Hugo, RonUniversity of Calgary.Roslöf, JanneTurku University of Applied Science.Songer, RobertKanazawa Technical College.Spooner, DanielÉcole Polytechnique, Montréal, Canada.
    Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5. Crawley, E. F.
    et al.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Malmqvist, J.
    Söderholm, D. H.
    Östlund, S.
    Curriculum design based on the CDIO model2005In: SEFI 2005 Annual Conference: Engineering Education at the Cross-Roads of Civilizations, Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Engineering , 2005, p. 184-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implement-Operate (CDIO) engineering educational strategy has been adopted by a number of universities as a framework for reforming engineering programs. One of the key activities in CDIO adoption and implementation is designing the engineering curriculum to integrate personal, interpersonal and system-building learning outcomes into the curriculum. This paper details approaches and experiences from curriculum design efforts at MIT, KTH, and Chalmers.

  • 6.
    Crawley, E. F.
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Malmqvist, J.
    Chalmers.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Brodeur, D. R.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Rethinking engineering education: The CDIO approach, second edition2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book describes an approach to engineering education that integrates a comprehensive set of personal, interpersonal, and professional engineering skills with engineering disciplinary knowledge in order to prepare innovative and entrepreneurial engineers. The education of engineers is set in the context of engineering practice, that is, Conceiving, Designing, Implementing, and Operating (CDIO) through the entire lifecycle of engineering processes, products, and systems. The book is both a description of the development and implementation of the CDIO model and a guide to engineering programs worldwide that seek to improve the education of young engineers.

  • 7.
    Crawley, Edward F
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Stanko, Tanya
    Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology.
    Educating Engineers for Research-based Innovation: Creating the learning outcomes framework2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference, Cambridge, MA., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a newly established graduate university in Moscow, Russia, with the knowledge triangle mission to educate students, advance knowledge, and foster innovation in order to address critical scientific, technological, and innovation challenges and gaps facing Russia and the world. Educational programs will therefore be designed to foster the graduate qualities that are needed for research, innovation and entrepreneurship. In order to develop a broad consensus around the educational mission of Skoltech, we engaged stakeholders to better understand their needs and the appropriate mission of Skoltech education in the triple helix ecosystem. Preliminary high-level learning outcomes were formulated, drawing on a workshop with stakeholders and on reference frameworks, among them the CDIO Syllabus. The preliminary learning outcomes were discussed in depth with stakeholders from industry, universities, research institutes and governmental organizations in Russia, EU and USA. This paper analyses the input from 38 stakeholders and presents the resulting Skoltech Learning Outcomes Framework.

  • 8.
    Crawley, Edward F.
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Soderholm, Diane F.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Curriculum Design based on the CDIO Syllabus2005In: 8TH UICEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING EDUCATION, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: BRINGING ENGINEERING EDUCATORS TOGETHER, UICEE , 2005, p. 313-317Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Edelbro, Catrin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Eitzenberger, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    LKAB.
    Svedberg, Erik
    LKAB.
    Engaging with Program Stakeholders to Support Program Development2017In: The 13th International CDIO Conference Proceedings - Full Papers / [ed] Brennon, R., Edström, K., Hugo, R., Roslöf, J., Songer, R., & Spooner, D., Calgary, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) has adopted CDIO as the framework for developing its engineering programs. At the Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, there are two programs focusing on tunnelling, mining and rock excavation. Despite very positive prospects for professionals in the field, the number of students has decreased for the last two years. Further, program content might not reflect recent developments or new requirements in the industry. Therefore, the programs and their courses are taken under renewed consideration. Given the nature of the challenges facing the programs, it is in this case particularly important to inform of the planned development through a dialogue with stakeholders. Stakeholder dialogue is also a key feature of a CDIO curriculum development (CDIO Standard 2). This paper reports on a process of engagement with industry representatives, initiated through a meeting to discuss the competence of newly graduated from LTU as well as the future needs in the industry. The input will make it more visible what programme and course development work needs to be done in the nearest future. A continued support and feedback from the industry is warranted during the programme development.

  • 10.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Academic and professional values in engineering education: Engaging with history to explore a persistent tensionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between academic and professional aims of engineering education is a remarkably consistent challenge facing engineering educators. Here, some historical roots of this issue are traced through the life and work of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895 - 1979), who emigrated from Sweden to the U.S. for an illustrious industrial and academic career. While Söderberg was a proponent for a more science-based curriculum, his rationale was related to solving real professional problems, and he would come to criticise the distancing of engineering education from engineering practice. Söderberg’s views are compared to a present-day reform concept for engineering education, the CDIO approach, founded by MIT and three Swedish universities. The similarities show the persistence of the issue, as many of Söderberg’s ideals, arguments, and proposed strategies, are fully recognisable in the current discussion. Further, Söderberg and CDIO share the ideal of mutually supporting professional and disciplinary preparation, implying that the tension should not be a zero-sum game. The paths to this ideal were different, however, as Söderberg wanted to integrate theoretical aspects to improve an overly practical education, while CDIO is about improving an overly theoretical education by integrating also other necessary professional aspects.

  • 11.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Academic and Professional Values in Engineering Education: Engaging with History to Explore a Persistent Tension2018In: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between academic and professional aims of engineering education is a remarkably consistent challenge facing engineering educators. Here, some historical roots of this issue are traced through the life and work of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895–1979), who emigrated from Sweden to the US for an illustrious industrial and academic career. While Söderberg was a proponent for a more science-based curriculum, his rationale was related to solving real professional problems, and he would come to criticise the distancing of engineering education from engineering practice. Söderberg's views are compared to a present-day reform concept for engineering education, the CDIO approach, founded by MIT and three Swedish universities. The similarities show the persistence of the issue, as many of Söderberg's ideals, arguments, and proposed strategies are fully recognisable in the current discussion. Further, Söderberg and CDIO share the ideal of mutually supporting professional and disciplinary preparation, implying that the tension should not be a zero-sum game. The paths to this ideal were different, however, as Söderberg wanted to integrate theoretical aspects to improve an overly practical education, while CDIO is about improving an overly theoretical education by integrating also other necessary professional aspects.

  • 12.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Aims of Engineering Education Research - The Role of the CDIO Initiative2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Confernce, Turku, Finland, June 12-16 2016, Turku, 2016, p. 974-985Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Design for Motivation2002In: The Digital University - Building a Learning Community / [ed] Hazemi, Reza, & Hailes, Stephen, London: Springer London, 2002, p. 193-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Doing course evaluation as if learning matters most2008In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 95-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates barriers for using course evaluation as a tool for improving student learning, through the analysis of course evaluation practices at The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), a technical university in Stockholm. Although there is a policy on development-focused course evaluation at KTH, several stakeholders have expressed dissatisfaction with its poor results. Interviews were conducted with faculty and student representatives to investigate the perceived purpose and focus of evaluation and its current utilization. Results show that evaluation is teaching- and teacher-focused. As course development is not in the foreground, evaluations merely have a fire alarm function. It is argued that course evaluation should be regarded as a component of constructive alignment, together with the intended learning outcomes, learning activities and assessment. Finally, the concept system alignment is proposed, extending constructive alignment to the institutional level. The evaluation task can generally be said to be: 1. to describe what actually happens in that which seems to happen 2. to tell why precisely this happens, and 3. to state the possibilities for something else to happen. (Franke-Wikberg & Lundgren, 1980, p. 148)

  • 15.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Exploring the dual nature of engineering education: Opportunities and challenges in integrating the academic and professional aspects in the curriculum2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering education is both academic, emphasising theory in a range of subjects, and professional, preparing students for engineering practice. Ideally, these aspects are also in a meaningful relationship in the curriculum, but the dual nature ideal is simultaneously a source of tensions. This theme is explored in the context of engineering education development, represented by the CDIO (Conceive, Design, Implement, Operate) approach. Cases on programme and course level illustrate how the dual nature ideal is pursued in the integrated curriculum. CDIO is also compared with PBL (problem/project-based learning), and opportunities to further emphasise research in the CDIO community are explored.

    Two critical accounts suggest widening the perspective from curriculum development per se, to the organisational conditions. First, the views of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895-1979) are compared with CDIO, showing considerable similarities in ideals, arguments, and strategies. This leads to a critique of the swinging pendulum metaphor. Then, experiences of unsustainable change leads to a model called organisational gravity, explaining the stability of programmes and implying two change strategies, with different availability, risks, resource demands, and sustainability of results.

    Refuting a rationalist view on organisation, an institutional logics perspective is used to analyse the tensions within engineering education. It is suggested that the logics of the academic profession dominates over the logics of the engineering profession, hence favouring “teaching theory” over “teaching professionals”. The integrated curriculum strategy is contingent on educators’ ability to unite theoretical and professional aspects in courses, and on the collegial capacity for coordination. Finally, the CDIO initiative is conceptualised as a field-level driver of institutional innovation, identifying some strategies for legitimacy.

  • 16.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Granskning av en tjänsteförslagsnämnds prövning av behörighetskravet för lektor avseende högskolepedagogisk utbildning: ett stickprov2008Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Organizational gravity: strategies for sustainable educational development2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Reflections on the Nordic Journal of STEM Education: Strengthening a Nordic STEM education community2017In: Nordic Journal of STEM Education, E-ISSN 2535-4574, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 257-261Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This journal is a new arena for “scholarship that matters”, particularly welcome due to its Nordic scope, STEM education focus, open access, and language options. By disseminating ideas, experiences, and credible evidence, it can help improve our understanding of consequential issues and support the advancement of education. By offering opportunities to learn about and build upon the work of others, it can strengthen the community, and increase the legitimacy of our work. Here, some reflections are made on the positioning and potentials of the journal.

  • 19.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Student feedback in engineering: Overview and background2012In: Enhancing Learning and Teaching Through Student Feedback in Engineering / [ed] Chenicheri Sid Nair, Arun Patil, Patricie Mertova, Oxford: Chandos Publishing, 2012, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews the need to improve key learning outcomes of engineering education, among them conceptual understanding, solving real problems in context, and enabling skills for engineering such as communication and teamwork. At the same time it is necessary to improve both the attractiveness of engineering to prospective students and retention in engineering programmes. Research suggests that to address these problems the full student learning experience needs to better affirm students' identity formation. Student feedback is identified as a key source of intelligence to inform curriculum and course development. An argument is made for clarifying the purpose of any student feedback system, as there is an inherent tension between utilising it for accountability or for enhancement. An example shows how enhancement is best supported by a rich qualitative investigation of how the learning experience is perceived by the learner. Further, a tension between student satisfaction and quality learning is identified, suggesting that to usefully inform improvement, feedback must always be interpreted using theory on teaching and learning. Finally, a few examples are provided to show various ways to collect, interpret and use student feedback.

  • 20.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH.
    Student feedback in engineering: Overview and background2012In: Enhancing Learning and Teaching through Student Feedback in Engineering / [ed] Mertova, P., Nair, S. and Patil, A., Cambridge, UK: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews the need to improve key learning outcomes of engineering education, among them conceptual understanding, solving real problems in context, and enabling skills for engineering such as communication and teamwork. At the same time it is necessary to improve both the attractiveness of engineering to prospective students and retention in engineering programmes. Research suggests that to address these problems the full student learning experience needs to better affirm students’ identity formation. Student feedback is identified as a key source of intelligence to inform curriculum and course development. An argument is made for clarifying the purpose of any student feedback system, as there is an inherent tension between utilising it for accountability or for enhancement. An example shows how enhancement is best supported by a rich qualitative investigation of how the learning experience is perceived by the learner. Further, a tension between student satisfaction and quality learning is identified, suggesting that to usefully inform improvement, feedback must always be interpreted using theory on teaching and learning. Finally, a few examples are provided to show various ways to collect, interpret and use student feedback.

  • 21.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The role of CDIO in engineering education research: Combining usefulness and scholarlinessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO Initiative is a community for engineering education development, but since 2016 its annual conference also calls for research. This paper considers possible roles for CDIO in the field of engineering education research (EER). The EER landscape is explored, in particular whether the aim of research is to seek knowledge to improve engineering education, or to seek knowledge for its own sake? Although usefulness and scholarliness are not mutually exclusive, the priority matters throughout the research process and in evaluating work. Introducing concepts from similar debates, this paper argues for embracing the tension, to form a productive relationship between scholarliness and usefulness. A dual objective is implied: usefully contributing to the improvement of engineering education and establishing a recognised research field enabling sustainable careers for researchers. Quality mechanisms are necessary for staking out borders and upholding standards, at least to weed out work that is neither scholarly nor useful.

  • 22.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    The role of CDIO in engineering education research: Combining usefulness and scholarliness2017In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO Initiative is a community for engineering education development, but since 2016 its annual conference also calls for research. This paper considers possible roles for CDIO in the field of engineering education research (EER). The EER landscape is explored, in particular considering whether the aim of research is to seek knowledge to improve engineering education, or to seek knowledge for its own sake? Although usefulness and scholarliness are not mutually exclusive, the priority matters throughout the research process and in evaluating work. Introducing concepts from similar debates, this paper argues for embracing the tension, to form a productive relationship between scholarliness and usefulness. A dual objective is implied: usefully contributing to the improvement of engineering education and establishing a recognised research field enabling sustainable careers for researchers. Quality mechanisms are necessary for staking out borders and upholding standards, at least to weed out work that is neither scholarly nor useful.

  • 23.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The tension between academic and professional values in engineering education - comparing the work of Carl Richard Söderberg and the CDIO approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Utvärdering av Akademiskt lärarskap: högskolepedagogisk verksamhet vid Malmö högskola2010Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Int CDIO Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bernhard, Jonte
    van den Bogaard, Maartje
    Building editorial capacity2018In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Integrated assessment of diciplinary and interpersonal skills - student perceptions of a novel learning experience2005In: 13th International Symposium at the Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development - Improved Student Learning Through Assessment, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Integrated Assessment of Diciplinary, Personal and Interpersonal Skills in a Design-Build Course2005In: 1st CDIO Conference, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Froumin, Isak
    Higher School of Economics.
    Stanko, Tatiana
    Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia.
    Crawley, Edward F.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology.
    Engaging stakeholders in defining education for innovation in Russia: consensus and tensions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Learning Lab IKT.
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Integrated Curriculum Design2007In: Rethinking Engineering Education: The CDIO Approach / [ed] Crawley, E.F., Malmqvist, J., Östlund, S., & Brodeur, D.R., Springer, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Mini Workshop - Designing Project-Based Courses for Learning and Cost-Effective Teaching2011In: 2011 Frontiers In Education Conference (FIE), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop draws on experience in the international collaboration for engineering education reform, called the CDIO Initiative, where project-based learning is a key part of the concept. The purpose of project-based courses in engineering education is to provide environments where students can develop a deeper working knowledge of technical fundamentals together with the complex skills necessary for engineering practice, or in short: where students can become engineers. In this workshop, the learning perspective is emphasized, by identifying trade-offs where there are inherent tensions between learning outcomes and other factors in project-based courses (such as project goal, product performance, technical sophistication, teacher popularity, student satisfaction). A set of principles are derived for enhancing learning and teaching in project-based courses, using concrete examples to illustrate thought-provoking implications. Each principle aims to improve both student learning outcomes and cost-effectiveness of teaching. Together the principles constitute a framework for learning-driven course design. The aim is to challenge assumptions and common practices in project-based courses, and provoke fruitful discussion among participants.

  • 31.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hellström, Per-Erik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Improving student learning in STEM education: Promoting a deep approach to problem-solvingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses educational practice related to problem-solving within STEM education. A conceptual framework is shaped by conceptualising problem-solving first as an educational aim, then as a learning activity. Five principles for purposeful active learning are derived. Through this theoretical lens we investigate an active learning method called student-led recitations. In this activity students are randomly selected to present solutions to given problems, requiring them to solve the problems in advance and prepare for presenting their solutions. Drawing on the conceptual framework and informed by course results and qualitative data in the form of student interviews and teacher experiences, we analyse the teaching method. One conclusion is to challenge recitations based on teacher demonstrations of problem-solving. We suggest that student-led recitations are a cost-effective intervention, improving learning while affording more stimulating roles to both students and teachers. 

  • 32.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    COMPARING TWO APPROACHES FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT: PBL AND CDIO2012In: Proceedings of the 8th International CDIO Conference, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, July 1 - 4, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Aalborg University, Denmark.
    PBL and CDIO: Complementary models for engineering education development2014In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 539-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive–design–implement–operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines, engineering projects, and change strategy. The structured comparison is intended as an introduction for learning about any of these models. It also invites reflection to support the understanding and evolution of PBL and CDIO, and indicates specifically what the communities can learn from each other. It is noted that while the two approaches share many underlying values, they only partially overlap as strategies for educational reform. The conclusions are that practitioners have much to learn from each other’s experiences through a dialogue between the communities, and that PBL and CDIO can play compatible and mutually reinforcing roles, and thus can be fruitfully combined to reform engineering education.

  • 34.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Malmi, L.
    Aalto University.
    Bernhard, J.
    Linköping University.
    Andersson, P.
    DTU.
    A bottom-up strategy for establishment of EER in three Nordic countries – the role of networks2018In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the emergence of an engineering education research (EER) community in three Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland and Sweden. First, an overview of the current state of Nordic EER authorship is produced through statistics on international publication. Then, the history of EER and its precursor activities is described in three national narratives. These national storylines are tied together in a description of recent networking activities, aiming to strengthen the EER communities on the Nordic level. Taking these three perspectives together, and drawing on concepts from community of practice theory, network theory and learning network theory, we discuss factors behind the differences in the countries, and draw some conclusions about implications for networking activities in a heterogeneous community. Further, we discuss the role of networks for affording a joint identity.

  • 35.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Levander, Sara
    Engström, Julia
    KTH.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Peer review of teaching merits in academic career systems: a comparative study2019In: Proceedings of the 8th Research in Engineering Education Symposium (REES 2019), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates peer review of teaching merits in promotion processes at two Swedish technical universities. At KTH, two external experts evaluate both scientific and teaching merits, while Chalmers invites three experts for scientific and one for pedagogical evaluation. 50 successful promotion cases, containing 126 expert statements, are investigated quantitatively and qualitatively. The analysis shows that neither university devotes the same attention to assessing teaching as scientific merits. In 2/3 of the cases, less than 1/3 of the text is devoted to evaluating teaching merits. Half the KTH cases are settled based on less than one page evaluating teaching. In pedagogical evaluations at Chalmers, teaching qualifications are broadly conceptualised including collegial and scholarly aspects. At KTH, the experts with Swedish affiliations demonstrate broader conceptualisations of teaching than the international experts do. This is interpreted as expressions of two different evaluation cultures, one scientific-international and one pedagogical-national. The legitimacy of these practices is considered.

  • 36.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Soderholm, Diane
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Knutson Wedel, Maria
    Chalmers.
    Teaching and Learning2007In: Rethinking Engineering Education: The CDIO Approach / [ed] Crawley, E.F., Malmqvist, J., Östlund, S., & Brodeur, D.R., Springer, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hallström, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Route Towards a Sustainable Design-Implement Course2007In: 3rd CDIO Conference, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Use of CDIO Standards in Swedish National Evaluation of Engineering Education Programs2005In: Proceedings of the 1st International CDIO Conference, 2005, p. 134-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report on a large-scale application of the CDIO standards, involving approximately 100 educational programs. The context is the Swedish national evaluation of its “civilingenjör” engineering degree programs made by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education (Högskoleverket, HSV).

    In the paper, we first briefly describe the CDIO standards focusing on the role as a support for continuous program development. We then present the self-evaluation materials used in the HSV evaluation and account for HSV’s motives for including the CDIO standards evaluation in the self-evaluation package and for the modifications made compared to the original CDIO standards.

    We then discuss the results from a survey and an interview study directed to the program managers that have applied the CDIO standards in the HSV evaluation. The questions in the survey aim to investigate the respondents’ view of the relevance, benefits, limitations and ease of use of the CDIO standards. The questions are aimed both at the overall level – the body of standards – as well as at the level of single standards.

  • 39.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hugo, Ron
    University of Calgary.
    A Proposal for Introducing Optional CDIO Standards2017In: Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Brennon, R., Edström, K., Hugo, R., Roslöf, J., Songer, R., & Spooner, D., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first version of the CDIO standards was presented in 2005 (Brodeur & Crawley, 2005). The aim of this paper is to explore if meeting current CDIO standards still corresponds to the expectations placed on graduates from leading engineering programs worldwide. In this paper, we first identify engineering competencies that are claimed to be essential both today and in the future, focusing on competencies whose relative importance have grown since the early 2000’s. We also identify pedagogical practices that aim to develop these particular competences. We then propose that these emerging skills and best practices should be incorporated in CDIO as “optional” CDIO standards. Whereas the original or “basic” CDIO standards are scoped with the expectations of a bachelor program in mind, an “optional” CDIO standard indicates a more advanced or broadened competence. A set of potential optional CDIO standards is enumerated. Seven of the potential optional CDIO standards are then elaborated in the same format as the current standards, i.e., with a description, rationale and suggested evidence.

  • 40. Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Knutson Wedel, Maria
    Lundqvist, Ulrika
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Fruergaard Astrup, Thomas
    Vigild, Martin
    Munkebo Hussman, Peter
    Grøm, Audun
    Lyng, Reidar
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Leong-Wee Kwee Huay, Helene
    Kamp, Aldert
    Towards CDIO Standards 3.02019In: Proceedings of the 15th International CDIO Conference, Aarhus University, June 25-27, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper is the CDIO Standards, specifically the formulation of CDIO Standards version 3.0. The paper first reviews the potential change drivers that motivate a revision of the Standards. Such change drivers are identified both externally (i.e., from outside of the CDIO community) and internally. It is found that external change drivers have affected the perceptions of what problems engineers should address, what knowledge future engineers should possess and what are the most effective teaching practices in engineering education. Internally, the paper identifies criticism of the Standards, as well as ideas for development, that have been codified as proposed additional CDIO Standards. With references to these change drivers, five areas are identified for the revision: sustainability, digitalization of teaching and learning; service; and faculty competence. A revised version of the Standards is presented. In addition, it is proposed that a new category of Standards is established, “optional standards”. Optional Standards are a complement to the twelve “basic” Standards, and serve to guide educational development and profiling beyond the current Standards. A selected set of proposed optional Standards are recommended for further evaluation and possibly acceptance by the CDIO community.

  • 41.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Integrated program descriptions: A tool for communicating goals and design of CDIO programs2006In: Proceedings of the 2nd International CDIO Conference, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO syllabus provides a generic platform for writing program goal statements. Specifically, intended learning outcomes for personal and professional skills and attitudes such as communication, teamwork and ethics can be stated by combining a topic from the CDIO syllabus with an appropriate cognitive verb that reflects the desired proficiency. However, a complete program goal statement must also include goals for mathematical, scientific and technical knowledge. Moreover, while a “pure” goal statement may be suitable for and support discussions with external stakeholders such as industry leaders who are not involved in the program design as such, deliberations with internal stakeholders such as faculty and students often need to address both the goals for the program and they way in which they are realized – the program design.

    In response to these needs, the paper presents a framework which brings together the goals and the design of the program. This achieved by combining the CDIO syllabus and the CDIO curriculum design tools, in a framework that also includes the statement of program-specific goals for disciplinary knowledge. We call this framework integrated program descriptions. In the paper, the contents of these components and the process of implementing them at Chalmers and KTH are discussed. The KTH case involves the CDIO-based Vehicle Engineering program. The Chalmers application spans about 70 engineering programs, both CDIO-based and non-CDIO-based. Benefits and challenges are discussed.

  • 42.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Using Integrated Programme Descriptions to Support a CDIO Programme Design Process2006In: World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 1446-2257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 259-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Application of CDIO Standards in the Evaluation of Swedish Engineering Degree Programmes2006In: World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 1446-2257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Manneberg, Otto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Rosén, Robert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Manneberg, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    En struktur för ökad funktionell kunskap hos studenten från räkneövningar2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    En struktur för räkneövningar med syftet att ge studenten ökade funktionella kunskaper och färdigheter i ämnet presenteras. Strukturen är avsedd att aktivera studenten både innan och under en räkneövning. Genom kamraträttning av frivilliga hemuppgifter frikopplade från bonussystem, student-student-diskussioner samt diskussion i helklass antas studenten uppmuntras till djupare lärstrategier och nå en högre taxonominivå inom ämnet.Strukturen utprovas på två studentgrupper; andraårsstudenter på ett civilingenjörsprogram på KTH, samt förstårsstudenter på optikerutbildningen på Karolinska Institutet som läser optikkurser vid KTH. Utvärdering sker under pågående kurs genom enkäter till alla studenterna samt intervjuer av optikerstudenter, samt efter fullgången kurs genom intervjuer av assistenter och ingenjörsstudenter. Resultaten visar att studenterna ställer sig positiva till det nya systemet och anser att det ger dem en djupare nivå av förståelse, att det skapar en mer transparent bild av rättningsprocessen, samt att det ökar interaktionen mellan studenter och skapar en bättre klassrumsmiljö. Deltagandet är stort bland optikerstudenterna, medan ingenjörsstudenterna anser att de har betydligt svårare att hitta tid till hemuppgifterna.

  • 45.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Flight Dynamics.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    3+2≠5 eller Programmål för ingenjörsutbildningar i ljuset av Bolognareformen2011In: 3:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2011, p. 47-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    KTH har infört en ny utbildningsstruktur, som innebär att de två sista åren på civilingenjörsutbildningen utgörs av masterprogram samt att studenterna ska vara behöriga att ta ut en kandidatexamen efter tre års studier. Man kan därmed säga att både kandidat och master ligger inbäddade i den femåriga civilingenjörsutbildningen. Kombinationen av utbildningsprogram, examina och utbildningsmål väcker några principiellt intressanta frågeställningar med långtgående konsekvenser för ingenjörsutbildningen. Vi har analyserat dessa frågeställningar och identifierat att vi står inför ett strategiskt vägval där det nu gäller att långsiktigt slå vakt om ingenjörsutbildningens värde som professionsutbildning. En väl genomförd implementering av den nya utbildningsstrukturen kan förena vetenskaplighet med ingenjörsmässighet och därmed väsentligt stärka ingenjörsutbildningen.

  • 46.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Programmål inom den nya utbildningsstrukturen på KTH2010Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Grøm, Audun
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Munkebo Hussmann, Peter
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Karvinen, Meeri
    Keskinen, Marko
    Knutson Wedel, Maria
    Lundqvist, Ulrika
    Lyng, Reidar
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nygaard, Mads
    Vigild, Martin
    Fruergaard Astrup, Thomas
    Mapping the CDIO Syllabus to the UNESCO key competencies for sustainability2019In: Proceedings of the 15th International CDIO Conference, Aarhus University, June 25-27, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a framework of key competencies for sustainability defined by UNESCO is used to evaluate the relevance of the CDIO Syllabus for promoting engineering education for sustainable development. The evaluation is performed in two steps. First, topics, terms and concepts in the CDIO Syllabus that corresponds to the different UNESCO key competencies are identified. The second step is a qualitative discussion where areas of strong mapping are highlighted and aspects that could be better visualized or strengthened in, or added to, the Syllabus are identified. Differences in definitions of various concepts between the CDIO Syllabus and the UNESCO key competencies and the overall relation between the two frameworks are discussed. It is concluded that the CDIO Syllabus is rather well aligned with the UNESCO framework, however several opportunities (not to say needs) for strengthening the Syllabus in relation to the key competencies are identified. The UNESCO key competencies are found to be useful instruments for scrutinizing and updating the CDIO Syllabus. Other opportunities for knowledge and methods transfer between the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) domain and the Engineering Education domain are identified. The paper is proposed to be used as basis for updating the CDIO Syllabus into a version 3.0 for maintaining its relevance in a changing world.

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