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  • 1.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Dawson, Ashley
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Poor, the Rich and the Immigrant2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bridge, Gavin
    et al.
    Durham University.
    Barca, Stefania
    University of Coimbra.
    Özkaynak, Begüm
    Boğaziçi University.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wyeth, Ryan
    Durham University.
    Towards a Political Ecology of EU Energy Policy2018In: Advancing Energy Policy: Lessons on the integration of Social Sciences and Humanities / [ed] Chris Foulds and Rosie Robison, Palgrave Pivot, 2018, p. 163-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the root of energy policy are fundamental questions about the sort of social and environmental futures in which people want to live and how decisions over different energy pathways and energy futures are made. The interdisciplinary field of political ecology has the capacity to address such questions, while also challenging how energy policy conventionally gets done. We outline a political ecology perspective on EU energy policy that illuminates how the distribution of social power affects access to energy services, participation in energy decision-making and the allocation of energy’s environmental and social costs.

  • 3.
    Bridge, Gavin
    et al.
    Durham University.
    Özkaynak, Begüm
    Boğaziçi University.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Energy infrastructure and the fate of the nation: Introduction to special issue2018In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 41, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we introduce a Special Issue of Energy Research and Social Science focused on energy infrastructure and the political economy of national development. Many countries are experiencing transformational growth in energy infrastructure, such as transmission and distribution systems; import, export and storage facilities; the development of domestic energy resources; and construction of new power generating stations based on wind, water, coal, gas and nuclear sources. Large-scale projects like these are frequently justified by appeals to grand narratives – promoting economic growth, securing energy supply, modernizing energy service provision, and transitioning to more environmentally sustainable energy systems - in which the fate of the nation is closely tied to infrastructural development. The papers in this collection present compelling empirical evidence of how claims for energy infrastructure’s national significance and/or necessity intersect with the (re)production of political and economic power. Drawing on case material from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia and Europe, they highlight the capacity of different energy technologies and infrastructural assemblages to shape political and economic outcomes beyond their role in storing, transporting or transforming energy. This Introduction to the Special Issue does three things. First, it characterises the scale and significance of the contemporary ‘infrastructural moment’, observing how, in many national contexts, energy policy-making remains centralised and divorced from public participation. Second, it critically differentiates existing literature on the political economy of energy infrastructure to identify five distinctive ways in which research understands the ‘political work’ infrastructure performs. Third, it introduces the papers in the Special Issue and organises them into four key themes. Overall, the Introduction affirms the importance for social science of understanding the economically and politically constitutive power of energy infrastructures. The critical reflexivity this requires is essential to moving towards energy infrastructures that are just, equitable and sustainable.

  • 4. Cardoso, Andrea
    et al.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Examining new geographies of coal: Dissenting energyscapes in Colombia and Turkey2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 224, p. 398-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global energy geographies are changing, call it by will or by market forces. As coal production declines or consumption is phased out in parts of the Global North, the future of coal will likely be decided in the Global South. In this article, we explore energyscapes, as multiple and nested sites of connectivity over energy, and their relation to energy justice, environmental conflicts and social movements in new geographies of coal. By putting into question the reproduction of multiple levels of socio-environmental injustices related to coal’s extraction and consumption, we trace the emerging South-South coal links with an empirical focus on Colombia and Turkey. Coal extraction and consumption, respectively, in these geographically distant but increasingly connected countries are linked by multiscalar socio-ecological interactions and conflicts. After exploring these interactions, we examine the changing energyscapes of coal operating on different layers (the market, the physical, and the socio-environmental damages) between the two countries. Our analysis reveals that these new geographies are anchored in cross-scalar environmental injustices and democratic deficits, only sustained with top-down measures and emerging bilateral dependencies. The coming challenge for energy justice, therefore, is to link local communities' claims and democratization of energyscapes between the supply and the demand sides.

  • 5.
    İnal, Onur
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Department of Near Eastern Studies .
    Turhan, EthemcanPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Transforming Socio-Natures in Turkey: Landscapes, State and Environmental Movements2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is an exploration of the environmental makings and contested historical trajectories of environmental change in Turkey. Despite the recent proliferation of studies on the political economy of environmental change and urban transformation, until now there has not been a sufficiently complete treatment of Turkey's troubled environments, which live on the edge both geographically (between Europe and Middle East) and politically (between democracy and totalitarianism).

    The contributors to Transforming Socio-Natures in Turkey use the toolbox of environmental humanities to explore the main political, cultural and historical factors relating to the country’s socio-environmental problems. This leads not only to a better grounding of some of the historical and contemporary debates on the environment in Turkey, but also a deeper understanding of the multiplicity of framings around more-than-human interactions in the country in a time of authoritarian populism.

    This book will be of interest not only to students of Turkey from a variety of social science and humanities disciplines but also contribute to the larger debates on environmental change and developmentalism in the context of a global populist turn.

  • 6.
    Ruiz Cayuela, Sergio
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wasting Democracy, Fueling Dissent: Refuse-Derived Fuels in Can Sant Joan (Catalonia)2019In: Frontiers in Energy Research, E-ISSN 2296-598XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cement industry is one of the most energy intensive in the world, contributing significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions. The use of refuse-derived fuels (RDF) in cement kilns is increasingly portrayed as a sustainable solution to reduce emissions while dealing with different types of waste. Nevertheless, the use of RDF in cement plants is contested by communities around the world, who are facing immediate environmental impacts. In this article, we examine the burgeoning movement against waste incineration in cement kilns legitimized as energy recovery. We start by revisiting the environmental justice literature, which laid the groundwork for the contemporary anti-RDF movement. Then, in order to highlight the energy dimension of RDF we focus on two energy-related concepts: energy justice and energy democracy. Through the case study of Can Sant Joan (Catalonia), we assess the suitability and usefulness of these concepts with the local movement against waste incineration. Our analysis suggests that the movement against RDF use can be further energized and strengthened by expanding into the realm of energy democracy. Both the anti-RDF and the energy democracy movement share a focus on the local scale, have similar typology of stakeholders involved, and favor a strong bottom-up approach while paying attention to unequal power relations. We also observe that these movements can mutually benefit from being better integrated with one another. Finally, we propose that a potential alliance between the Plataforma Antiincineració de Montcada i Reixac (PAMiR) and the Xarxa per la Sobirania Energètica (Xse) in Catalonia, can mobilize fruitful internal tensions toward a more inclusive and democratic future.

  • 7. Temper, Leah
    et al.
    Walter, Mariana
    Rodriguez, Iokiñe
    Kothari, Ashish
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    A perspective on radical transformations to sustainability: resistances, movements and alternatives2018In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A transformation to sustainability calls for radical and systemic societal shifts. Yet what this entails in practice and who the agents of this radical transformation are require further elaboration. This article recenters the role of environmental justice movements in transformations, arguing that the systemic, multi-dimensional and intersectional approach inherent in EJ activism is uniquely placed to contribute to the realization of equitable sustainable futures. Based on a perspective of conflict as productive, and a “conflict transformation” approach that can address the root issues of ecological conflicts and promote the emergence of alternatives, we lay out a conceptual framework for understanding transformations through a power analysis that aims to confront and subvert hegemonic power relations; that is, multi-dimensional and intersectional; balancing ecological concerns with social, economic, cultural and democratic spheres; and is multi-scalar, and mindful of impacts across place and space. Such a framework can help analyze and recognize the contribution of grassroots EJ movements to societal transformations to sustainability and support and aid radical transformation processes. While transitions literature tends to focus on artifacts and technologies, we suggest that a resistance-centred perspective focuses on the creation of new subjectivities, power relations, values and institutions. This recenters the agency of those who are engaged in the creation and recuperation of ecological and new ways of being in the world in the needed transformation.

  • 8.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Adaptation as biopolitics:: Why state policies in Turkey do not reduce the vulnerability of seasonal agricultural workers to climate change2015In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 31, p. 296-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in the connection between climate change and migration, but literature so far has mostly focused on climate refugees, permanent migrants, and the implications for destination countries. Seasonal workers, one of the most vulnerable groups in the agricultural sector, have received scant attention. Nonetheless, several governments are already planning action to ensure the adaptation of seasonal workers to a changed climate. This article focuses on two recent social and climate change policies adopted by the Turkish government targeting seasonal workers. Based on a discourse analysis of the two policies and fieldwork carried out on a site of intervention, the article argues that such policies, although employed in the name of adaptation, are in fact biopolitical interventions. Their main purpose is to secure the uninterrupted circulation of commodities and workers rather than reduce root causes of vulnerability. As a result the responsibility to adapt is individualized. We contribute to an incipient literature on biopolitics and climate change by showing how the spectre of climate change and the pretext of adaptation serve to expand the state's control of populations rather than reduce core vulnerabilities.

  • 9.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Climate change policy in Turkey: current opportunities, persistent problems: Introduction2017In: New Perspectives on Turkey, ISSN 0896-6346, E-ISSN 1305-3299, Vol. 56, p. 131-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    “Democracy Happens Where the People Are”: Social Conflict, Deliberation and Youth Perspectives in Post-Gezi Turkey2017In: Southeastern Europe, ISSN 0094-4467, E-ISSN 1876-3332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The turmoil in Turkey’s domestic politics has been exacerbating at an unforeseen pace since the Gezi protests in 2013. What made this protest period particularly remarkable was the multiplicity and diversity of youth discourses, that crossed the borders of a single issue-based opposition. The Gezi period and its aftermath in this sense can be understood as a tipping point in contemporary Turkish politics. Hence, in an attempt to understand the converging and diverging viewpoints of the young people who were the protagonists of the Gezi protests, this study utilizes Q-methodology and deciphers diverging and converging narratives of urban, secular, educated young people, who are said to have constituted the main body of protestors. Following the analysis of the primary data, the author observes three emerging discourses dominant among 21 young people (aged 20–30). The results hint at shared viewpoints on the Gezi protests as an “apolitical movement”, a “violent movement” and a “Jacobin movement”. The author argues that this divergence points at the exacerbating social polarization among youth groups in Turkey, which reached dangerous heights after the putsch on 15 July 2016.

  • 11.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ecología política de las nuevas geografías del carbón: La cadena de carbón entre Colombia y Turquía2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Environmental History of Modern Migrations2018In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Right here, right now: a call for engaged scholarship on climate justice in Turkey2017In: New Perspectives on Turkey, ISSN 0896-6346, E-ISSN 1305-3299, Vol. 56, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Sabancı University, Turkey.
    Value-based adaptation to climate change and divergent developmentalisms in Turkish agriculture2016In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 121, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increased recognition and attention on human values with respect to their role in shaping climate change adaptation policies. Furthermore, as the recent literature suggests, values held by policy actors are centrally located in the debates linking adaptation to development. However, different values tend to give way to diverging adaptation policy preferences, which often appear as a dichotomy of adjustment (incremental change) versus transformation. This study enquires the assumptions and values in adaptation policy by using Q-methodology and advances value-based approach to adaptation policy with an empirical case from Turkey, a developing country with key vulnerabilities in its agricultural system. By exploring the narratives of 29 policy actors who participated in the making of Turkey's climate change adaptation strategy, the analysis suggests that assumptions regarding an economic growth-driven development agenda often shape adaptation concerns. Further analysis of the 4 emerging discourses (productivism, techno-managerialism, eco-localism, and authoritarianism) suggests that while discourses agree that the ultimate goal of adaptation is safeguarding a developmentalist vision in agriculture, they differ on the means and agents for reaching this goal. I argue that this divergence can enhance the transformative potential of adaptation by bringing "how," "for whom," and "why" questions back to policymaking.

  • 15.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Eakin, Hallie
    University of Arizona.
    Mukute, Mutizwa
    Rhodes University.
    Marshall, Fiona
    University of Sussex.
    What does transformative research for sustainability look like?2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts to nurture more sustainable, just futures are happening all around us, albeit in the context of a rapidly changing and highly unequal world that is on the brink of irrevocably dismantling the ecological foundations that sustain human life. The researchers and partner organizations in the Transformations to Sustainability Programme are learning from and accompanying some of those ongoing efforts, in order to shed light on key processes in transformative change, and to better understand how such efforts might be facilitated, adapted, joined up and enhanced across different contexts and scales.

  • 16.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Cutting the Fence, Sabotaging the Border: Migration as a Revolutionary Practice2017In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Of (not) being neighbors: cities, citizens and climate change in an age of migrations2019In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Borders are back with a vengeance. From the Americas to the Mediterranean, borders cut through the increasingly integrated world in a way that exposes the inside-outside logic of contemporary capitalism. All this happens on a backdrop where cities are becoming the key sites of contestation since borders and levees do not suffice to keep them intact. Cities are also increasingly becoming the focus of international efforts to deal with climate change and migration, where nation-states are falling short. By synthesizing the possibilities of urban belonging and right-to-the-world, we argue that new urban imaginaries are at the frontline of the mobilities debate today. Consequently, we argue for a cross-pollination of mobility justice and climate justice as urban citizenship. The main thrust of our argument is that there are viable alternatives to the isolationist fortress nation model, which can bring a new dimension to debates concerning climate change and migration. Fearless cities are but one example of these emerging alternatives. By focusing on the opportunities for a radical response to climate change and migration, we suggest that cities can respond to the burning mobility challenges of our times with a just, grounded and egalitarian urban citizenship framed as mobile commons.

  • 18.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Cardoso, Andrea
    Universidad del Magdalena.
    Political ecology of the new geographies of coal: The coal chain between Colombia and Turkey2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gündoğan, Arif Cem
    China’s role in Turkey’s energy future: Temptation to invest in Turkey’s coal sector will test President Xi's commitment to climate leadership2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gündoğan, Arif Cem
    Price and prejudice: The politics of carbon market establishment in Turkey2019In: Turkish Studies, ISSN 1468-3849, E-ISSN 1743-9663, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 512-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite concerns on their effectiveness and legitimacy, carbon markets are often presented as the main tool of climate policy. Developing countries are particularly eager to establish and interlink their carbon markets to benefit from global climate investment flows. Turkey is a belated but willing player in this endeavor. In tracing the ambivalent politics of establishing a carbon market in Turkey, we focus on the perceptions of different actors vis-à-vis carbon marketization attempts. Using policy documents, 22 expert interviews, and process tracing, we question the underlying assumptions on carbon markets in a country with unambitious climate targets. Our findings suggest that the making of carbon market in Turkey is not necessarily a rational, national interest-driven process but instead one promoted by the international organizations including World Bank and the EU. We conclude that this preference for market-based instruments defer public interest, favor more incremental policies, and ignore distributive justice concerns.

  • 21.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gündoğan, Arif Cem
    The post-politics of the green economy in Turkey: re-claiming the future?2017In: Journal of political ecology, ISSN 1073-0451, E-ISSN 1073-0451, Vol. 24, p. 277-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The green  economy  is  often  defined as an economic configu ration  that  results  in  improved  human  well - being  and  social  equity,  while  reducing   (or  at  least  decoupling  from)   environmental  risks .  It  is  elusive,   and  can  be  read  as  a  new  way  of  ensuring  and  maintaining  capital  accumulation  accompanied  by   neoliberal  austerity  policies ,  where   a  green  rationale  is  required  to  maintain  the  structural  roots  of  the   global political economy. As such, critics  often  identify  its  self -contradictory nature , in  giving  legitimacy  and coherence to a number of  public  policies.  This article  critically  examines  the  post- politicisation of  the  green economy , by  tracing its social construction and meaning -making .  In doing  so,  it follows the  green  economy  debate  in  the   post -politicization  of  the  environment  in  Turkey,  a  rapidly  developing  country   with  significant  socio -ecological  challenges.  Th e  analysis  suggests  that  the  green  economy  will  become   more important at Turkey tr ies to meet  international environmental  agreements .  Th e article sheds light on  its  preparatory  report  for   the  Rio+20   Summit,   titled  Turkey' s  sustainable  development  report:  claiming   the  futu re 2012 .  We  find  that  the  green economy serves as a useful discursive tool to legitimize a  state - facilitated, market -driven,  full -frontal assault on ecosystems in Turkey, particularly in  the energy sector.  We  argue  that  a   clear  rejection  of  such  framings   and  the  development   of  alternatives  to  post - politicization,  are  the two key challenges  facing  the environmental movement in the country.

  • 22.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kallis, Giorgos
    Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain.
    Zografos, Christos
    John Hopkins University – Pompeu Fabra University (JHU-UPF) Public Policy Centre and Department of Political and Social Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.
    Power Asymmetries, Migrant Agricultural Labour and Adaptation Governance in Turkey: A Political Ecology of Double Exposures2019In: Facing hydrometeorological extremes: A governance issue / [ed] Isabelle La Jeunesse and Corinne Larrue, John Wiley & Sons, 2019, Wiley, p. 261-282Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Mazlum, Semra Cerit
    Sahin, Umit
    Sorman, Alevgul H.
    Beyond special circumstances: climate change policy in Turkey 1992-20152016In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 448-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contours of Turkey's climate policy have remained almost intact over the past two decades. Being an Annex I party without any mitigation commitments, Turkey maintains a peculiar position under UNFCCC. Subsequent to 12years of delay in signing both the Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol, Turkey had the highest rate of increase in greenhouse gas emissions among the Annex I countries with 110.4% upsurge in the period 1990 and 2013. Yet with the new climate regime now in place, the country's mitigation pledges fall short of expectations both in terms of realistic projections and its ambition to step up in the post-2020 period. Climate policies in Turkey, an EU candidate and OECD founding member with a growing economy, remain under-investigated. Although the country has a wide range of policies and institutions in place, it shows limited progress in addressing climate change. Based on evidence from the literature, we observe that climate policies operationalize in Turkey insofar as they do not directly confront developmental ambitions, leaving policy diffusion with limited success. To provide a historic overview, we focus on climate policy development, actors, processes, and contemporary trends. Evidence shows that these are highly ridden with the politics of special circumstances: a notion that Turkey employs to refrain from bindings commitments. In order to go beyond special circumstances discourse, we argue the need for a bold policy shift in Turkey, a country subject to adverse impacts of climate change and high-carbon lock-in risk due to development policy preferences.

  • 24.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nash, Sarah Louise
    Moving targets, moving people: confronting the challenge of climate change and migration2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Özkaynak, Begüm
    Boğaziçi University.
    Aydın, Cem İskender
    Istanbul Policy Center, Sabanci University.
    Coal, ash, and other tales: The making and remaking of the anti-coal movement in Aliağa, Turkey2019In: Transforming Socio-Natures in Turkey: Landscapes, State and Environmental Movements / [ed] Onur İnal and Ethemcan Turhan, Routledge, 2019, p. 166-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we take a critical look at the historical transformation of grassroots mobilization and political engagement in Aliağa in the period between these two historical moments (1990 and 2016) by using archival material from two national newspapers with wide circulation, secondary literature, and indepth interviews with some of the key actors. Aliağa appears to be a curious case for neglect in the scholarly literature on environmental activism in Turkey, a history of victories and defeats only partially told. This is particularly relevant and important since the powerful coalition that had emerged in the 1990s (formed by locals, the Green Party, the main social democratic opposition party in parliament, the Union of Chambers of Turkish Engineers and Architects and labor unions) fought and won a major victory giving way to the cancellation of the government’s plans and the birth of a combatant environmental movement in the region. Although it was one of the fi rst nationally debated environmental justice successes of this scale in Turkey ( Şahin, 2010 ), anti-coal movement in Aliağa still remains somewhat under-investigated in the country’s history of environmental movements. Thus, providing a micro-historical account would not only give the Aliağa anti-coal movement the due credit it deserves, but also help us illustrate the changing nature and shifting contours of environmental mobilizations in Turkey at large in a time of re-escalating authoritarianism. Since “there is not a right or wrong environmentalism, but narratives and practices of environmentalism which are historically produced” ( Armiero and Sedrez, 2014 : 11), our effort here also helps to reveal some hidden narratives and practices which are equally relevant for contemporary environmental movement in Turkey. To this end, we describe how the hegemonic state – in a counter-movement – reacted to the legal developments and the activism in Aliağa by changing the rules of the game; amending institutional and legal frameworks for investment decisions as needed, thereby speeding up and deepening neoliberal reforms. The tale of the anti-coal struggle in Aliağa presented in this chapter is important for environmental struggles in general, as it offers interesting insights into the ways environmental movements and their counter-hegemonic powers clash with, confront, and negotiate with the state just to die out and eventually be reborn.

  • 26.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Şorman, Alevgul Hadiye
    Basque Center for Climate Change (BC3).
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Reconciling qualitative and quantitative storytelling in just energy decision making: A research design challenge contribution2018In: CONTROL, CHANGE AND CAPACITY-BUILDING IN ENERGY SYSTEMS: SHAPE ENERGY Research Design Challenge / [ed] Patrick Sumpf and Christian Büscher, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 27-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research design challenge, we focus on the ‘how’ question of transdisciplinary study of energy systems and futures, taking into consideration the challenges of control. However, as Stirling (2014) reminds us, deterministic pictures of control can be problematic. Rather, our overarching aim here is to contribute to the emerging literature on energy research and social science by grounding it with contributions from three distinct perspectives (organization studies, political ecology and societal metabolism). We identify some opportunities for mending the gap between qualitative and quantitative approaches to energy research and suggest potential entry points to unpack energy decisions and their consequences, both expected and unexpected. We first start with a presentation of multiple epistemologies on energy and reflect on the multiplicity of knowledge. Then we move on to reflect on different ways of approaching energy questions including a specific focus on embracing the inherent complexity in societally relevant energy research. In the penultimate section, we turn to questions of power, scale and space. We conclude with some bottlenecks and opportunities for a truly transdisciplinary energy research that is societally relevant, just, equitable, sustainable and useful at once.

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