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  • 1.
    Andrae, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Johansson, David
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Fakhrai, Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Manrique Carrera, Arturo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    High-pressure catalytic combustion of gasified biomass in a hybrid combustor2005In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 293, no 1-2, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic combustion of synthetic gasified biomass was conducted in a high-pressure facility at pressures ranging from 5 to 16 bars. The catalytic combustor design considered was a hybrid monolith (400 cpsi, diameter 3.5 cm, length 3.6 cm and every other channel coated). The active phase consisted of 1 wt.% Pt/gamma-Al2O3 With wash coat loading of total monolith 15 wt.%. In the interpretation of the experiments, a twodimensional boundary layer model was applied successfully to model a single channel of the monolith. At constant inlet velocity to the monolith the combustion efficiency decreased with increasing pressure. A multi-step surface mechanism predicted that the flux of carbon dioxide and water from the surface increased with pressure. However, as the pressure (i.e. the Reynolds number) was increased, unreacted gas near the center of the channel penetrated significantly longer into the channel compared to lower pressures. For the conditions studied (lambda = 46, T-in = 218-257 degrees C and residence time similar to 5 ms), conversion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were diffusion limited after ignition, while methane never ignited and was kinetically controlled. According to the kinetic model surface coverage of major species changed from CO, H and CO2 before ignition to O, OH, CO2 and free surface sites after ignition. The model predicted further that for constant mass flow combustion efficiency increased with pressure, and was more pronounced at lower pressures (2.5-10 bar) than at higher pressures (> 10 bar).

  • 2.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    a sealed rechargeable metal-oxygen battery for traction purposes1980In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 8, p. 513-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prototype of a sealed, rechargeable iron-oxygen battery that is based on a new oxygen electrode design is described, noting that the electrode design has made it possible to considerably simplify construction. It is pointed out that the oxygen electrode can be described as a self-breathing oxygen pocket electrode. It reaches 2 cm above the electrolyte in the battery and is fed with oxygen at the top of the battery by virtue of the pressure difference between the top of the electrode and the bottom.

  • 3.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Attempts to innovative solutions regarding research and development of fuel cells and batteries2001Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 4.
    BURSELL, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    BJÖRNBOM, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    A METHOD FOR STUDYING MICROELECTRODES BY MEANS OF MICROMANIPULATORS AS APPLIED TO CARBON AGGLOMERATES FROM OXYGEN REDUCTION ELECTRODE CATALYST1990In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 363-365Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bursell, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    electrochemical investigation of microagglomerates from fc-cathodes1990In: 1990 Fuel cell seminar, 1990, p. 419-421Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bursell, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Pirjamali, M.
    Kiros, Yohannes
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    La0.6Ca0.4CoO3, La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and LaNiO3 as bifunctional oxygen electrodes2002In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 1651-1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of perovskite catalysts was investigated for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolyte and at room temperature, supplied by oxygen or air. A meniscus cell was used to screen-test candidate catalysts for their bifunctionality and assess their activity for ORR at 3 mm depth of immersion (DOI) in the electrolyte. Based on the meniscus data LaNiO3, La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 were selected for further assessment in microelectrode and half-cell studies. Activity tests for the ORR and OER, Tafel slopes at high current densities and apparent activation energies for the ORR were determined using a microelectrode technique on samples of the selected perovskites, La0.1Ca0.9MnO3, La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 and LaNiO3 with and without graphite support. Tafel slopes of ca. 120 mV per decade and apparent activation energies of approximately 18 kcal mol(-1) were measured at high cathodic current densities. Cycle-life and performance of La0.1Ca0.9MnO3, La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 and LaNiO3-based gas-diffusion electrodes in half-cell configurations were tested at a constant current density of 25 mA cm(-2) With subsequent and intermittent polarizations. Similar activities resulted in the ORR, while increased numbers of cycles were observed for the La0.1Ca0.9MnO3-based electrode. Furthermore, electrode material compositions, especially PTFE contents were optimized to conform to the establishment of the three phase interactions of the electrode structure, Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) and BET-surface area analyses were carried out in order to find out the morphological and surface properties of the perovskite materials.

  • 7.
    Kiros, Yohannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Reaction Engineering.
    Low energy consumption in chlor-alkali cells using oxygen reduction electrodes2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An air/oxygen gas diffusion electrode for use as a cathode to replace the traditional hydrogen-evolving electrode in chlor-alkali electrolysis was assessed. Attempts to stabilize the cathode have been addressed in order to circumscribe problems associated with "flooding" or "wetting-in" properties. Variation of the hydrophobic concentration in the gas diffusion layer had a significant effect on the electrochemical tests of both the half-cell and electrolysis of the chlor-alkali cells. Life-tests as well as performance characteristics for both types of cells have shown encouraging results at NaOH concentration levels of ca 8M NaOH and temperatures of 70 and ca. 80 degrees C, respectively. Though cell voltages of about 2V were achieved and thereby reducing the energy consumption by 30-35% compared to the state-of-the-art membrane cell, the contributions of overvoltages were still high compared to the equilibrium potential of about 1.23V. Efforts to limit the individual parts of overvoltages as well as maintenance of the zero-gap cell at least on the anode side have been carried out. Two different kinds of cation exchange membranes have been used for the electrolysis cell. However, the cation exchange membrane with hydrophilic properties having high initial performances showed tendencies of blister formations.

  • 8.
    Kiros, Yohannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Pirjamali, M.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Reaction Engineering.
    Oxygen reduction electrodes for electrolysis in chlor-alkali cells2006In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 51, no 16, p. 3346-3350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen reduction electrodes, containing non-noble metal catalysts supported on high surface area carbon and wet-proofed with PTFE were tested under reaction conditions for the chlor-alkali electrolysis. Double-layer gas diffusion electrodes were prepared by rolling of an active layer and diffusion layer on a nickel wire screen, compressed and sintered at 300 degrees C. Electrochemical measurements for substantiating the activity and stability of the half-cells were conducted in 8 M NaOH by supplying oxygen at a cell temperature of 70 degrees C and a constant current load of 300 mA cm(-2). An electrolysis cell with a dimensionally stable anode (DSA) and double-layered cathode was assembled, where 4.8 M NaCl and oxygen were supplied, respectively, for the production of chlorine and NaOH. The cell performances as well as stability of the electrodes were investigated at about 80 degrees C. This study shows that by replacing the high voltage consuming hydrogen-evolving reaction and by adopting highly active electrocatalysts as cathode materials, energy savings of more than 30% could be realized.

  • 9. Lehtinen, T
    et al.
    Sundholm, G
    Holmberg, S
    Sundholm, F
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Electrochemical characterization of PVDF-based proton conducting membranes for fuel cells1998In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 43, p. 1881-1890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electrochemical characterization of proton-conducting membranes prepared by irradiation-induced grafting and subsequent sulfonation of PVDF films has been performed. In particular, measurements of the ionic conductivity, oxygen solubility and diffusion in the membranes are presented, as well as kinetic data for the oxygen reduction reaction in a membrane-platinum system and a simulation of the performance of these PVDF-g-PSSA membranes in a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a microcathode technique. At sufficient degrees of grafting (>40%) the conductivity reaches 0.1 Scm−1, well above that of Nafion 117 (DuPont). The PVDF-g-PSSA membranes show lower solubilities and higher diffusion coefficients of oxygen and a higher water uptake than Nafion 117. The microcathode measurements indicate that those PVDF-g-PSSA membranes which have a conductivity higher than that of Nafion 117 may also give improved performance in fuel cell conditions provided that they have the necessary mechanical and chemical stability.

  • 10.
    Zhu, Bin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bai, X. Y.
    Chen, G. X.
    Yi, W. M.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Fundamental study on biomass-fuelled ceramic fuel cell2002In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent development in the advanced intermediate temperature (400 to 700degreesC) ceramic fuel cell (CFC) research brings up feasibility and new opportunity to develop innovative biomass-fuelled CFC technology. This work focuses on fundamentals of the biomass-fuelled CFCs based on available biofuel resources through thermochemical conversion technologies. Both real producer gas from biomass gasification and imitative compounded gas were used as the fuel to operate the CFCs in the biomass CFC testing station. The composition of the fuel gas was varied in a wide range of practices of the present conversion technology both in KTH and Shandong Institute of Technology (SDIT), CFC performances were achieved between 100 and 700 mW cm(-2) at 600-800degreesC corresponding to various gas compositions. A high performance close to 400 mW cm(-2) was obtained at 600degreesC for the gas with the composition of H-2 (50 per cent) + CO (15 per cent) + CO2 (15 per cent) + N-2 (20 per cent) and more than 600 mW cm(-2) for the H-2 (55 per cent) + CO (28 per cent) + CO2 (17 per cent) at 700degreesC. This paper presents the experimental results and discusses the fundamentals and future potentiality on the biomass fuelled CFCs.

  • 11.
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Lundblad, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Determination of the effective diffusion coefficient of nanoporous carbon by means of a single particle microelectrode technique2003In: Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 0022-0728, E-ISSN 1873-2569, Vol. 549, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single particle microelectrode technique with a micromanipulator was applied and adapted for characterisation of mass transport properties of ionic species in a high surface area nanoporous carbon, with uniform pore size of 8 Angstrom. The effective diffusivity of 6 M KOH in this material was determined by means of potential step experiments on nanoporous carbon particles of different sizes. The results were analysed for short times (Cottrell model) and for long times (spherical diffusion model). The average effective diffusion coefficient for short and long times was 1.5x10(-9) and 1.2x10(-9) cm(2) s(-1), respectively. The relatively small diffusivity values are discussed in terms of interaction between the ion hydration shell and water molecules adsorbed on the pore wall.

  • 12.
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Lundblad, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Characterization of ion transport in a nanoporous carbon for double layer capacitors2000In: Proceedings of Advances in Science and technology 29: (Mass and Charge Transport in Inorganic Materials: Fundamentals to devices, part A), 2000, p. 439-446Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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