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  • 1.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Javakhishvili, Irakli
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Hvilsted, Søren
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of well-defined di- and triblock copolymers based on poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] and poly(ε-caprolactone)2014In: ACS National Meeting, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, di- and triblock copolymers based on poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have been prepared. The PDMAEMA length was kept constant for both di- and triblock copolymers, while in the diblock copolymers the PCL length was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. For the triblock blockcopolymers, on the other hand, also the PCL blocks were of the same length yielding one ABA- and one BAB-type block copolymer. In the next step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized to yield polyelectrolytes with either one or two charged block(s). In the final step, difference in adsorption behavior onto a negatively charged cellulose surface and subsequent alteration of surface properties was investigated. Overall, the polymers were evaluated in solid state, in solution, in water dispersion, and on cellulose surfaces with techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and quartz crystal microbalance.

  • 2.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    A comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing concern for the environment has, in the past years, directed the research towards a bigger focus on new “greener” materials, such as cellulose-reinforced options. Cellulose is the most abundant organic raw material in the world and it is a versatile material. However, to be able to use it in applications where it is not inherently compatible, a modification is often necessary.1-3 One common method to achieve this modification is to graft polymers onto/from the cellulose chain. This can change the inherent properties of cellulose to attain new properties, such as dimensional stability and water repellency.3 In addition to this, it has been shown that polyectrolytes can be physiosorbed onto charged surfaces.4 Due to this, it is possible to physically modify cellulose by adsorbing a polymer through electrostatic interactions instead of attaching it with a covalent bond.5

    However, a more detailed investigation concerning differences of covalent and physical attachment of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) onto cellulose, has to the author’s best knowledge not been performed. Therefore, this project aims to compare these two techniques. Covalently bonded PCL was grafted by surface-initiated ring opening polymerization (SI-ROP) from the cellulose. For the adsorption approach, a block copolymer consisting of PCL and a shorter segment of poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ROP and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was then quaternized, which resulted in a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. This can then be used as an electrostatic linker allowing the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto the negatively charged cellulose model surface. Finally, differences between the two approaches are evaluated regarding for example surface coverage and grafting/physiosorption efficiency investigated with techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  • 3.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Preparation and evaluation of a block copolymer compatibilizer for biocomposite applications2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a comparison between covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto a nanocellulose model surface was conducted. For the covalent attachment, surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) was performed. For the physical attachment, a charged block copolymer consisting of PCL and quaternized PDMAEMA was synthesized by ROP and ATRP, and adsorbed to the cellulose. Finally, differences in between the two substrates were investigated with techniques such as AFM.

  • 4.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past years, a growing concern for the environment has forced the research to focus more on new “greener” materials. The most abundant organic raw material in the world is cellulose. This, in combination with the versatility of the material, makes it interesting as a green option in various applications. However, to be able to take advantage of all characteristics possessed by cellulose, i.e., use it in applications where it is not inherently compatible, modification is often necessary.1-3 One common method used for modifying cellulose is grafting of polymers onto/from the cellulose chain. This offers a way of changing the inherent properties of cellulose to attain new properties, such as dimensional stability and water repellency.3

    Additionally, it has been shown that polyectrolytes can be physiosorbed onto charged surfaces.4 This has made it possible to physically modify cellulose by adsorbing a polymer through electrostatic interactions instead of attaching it with a covalent bond.5 However, a more detailed investigation concerning the differences, such as surface coverage and grafting/physiosorption efficiency, between a covalent and physical attachment of a polymer has to the author’s best knowledge earlier not been performed. Therefore, this project aims to compare these two techniques. A block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) is made, see figure 1 for 1H-NMR-spectrum.

    Figure 1. The 1H-NMR-spectrum of PCL-block-PDMAEMA (in CDCl3).

    The PDMAEMA-part is then quaternized (figure 2), which results in a charged chain – a polyelectrolyte.

    Figure 2.The quaternization of the PDMAEMA block to obtain cationic charges.

    The charges allow for the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto a cellulose surface. Finally, to evaluate and compare the differences between the covalent and the physical surface modification, regarding for example surface coverage, grafting/physiosorption efficiency, adhesion and matrix compatibility, various characterization methods are employed: fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements (CA), micro adhesion measurement apparatus (MAMA), force measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and macroscopic peel tests using dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) or Instron.

    Figure 3. A schematic drawing of covalent attachment and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose.

    Further work after preparation of fibres may include such steps as making of fiber-reinforced composites, out of both chemically and physically modified fibres, where for example differences concerning mechanical properties would be investigated.

    References

    (1) Lönnberg, H.; Fogelström, L.; Berglund, L.; Malmström, E.; Hult, A. European Polymer Journal 2008, 44, 2991.

    (2) Lönnberg, H.; Zhou, Q.; Brumer, H., 3rd; Teeri Tuula, T.; Malmström, E.; Hult, A. Biomacromolecules 2006, 7, 2178.

    (3) Roy, D.; Semsarilar, M.; Guthrie, J. T.; Perrier, S. Chemical Society Reviews 2009, 38, 2046.

    (4) Decher, G.; Hong, J. D. Berichte der Bunsen-Gesellschaft 1991, 95, 1430.

    (5) Utsel, S.; Carlmark, A.; Pettersson, T.; Bergström, M.; Malmström, E.; Wågberg, L. Abstracts of Papers, 241st ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Anaheim, CA, United States, March 27-31, 2011 2011, CELL.

  • 5.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, an investigation concerning differences between covalent and physical attachment of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to a nanocellulose modell surface was conducted. For the covalent attachment, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) was performed using the “grafting-from” approach, building the polymer from the surface. For the physical attachment, a block copolymer consisting of PCL and poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ROP and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was then quaternized, which resulted in a charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The charges allow for the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto the nanocellulose modell surface. The length of the PDMAEMA-part was kept constant (DP=20), and the length of PCL was varied (DP=150, 300, 600) for both the covalently attached polymer and for the copolymer. Finally, differences between the two approaches were evaluated regarding for example surface coverage and grafting/physiosorption efficiency investigated with techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

  • 6.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Physical Tuning of Cellulose-Polymer Interactions Utilizing Cationic Block Copolymers Based on PCL and Quaternized PDMAEMA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the aim was to prepare and evaluate a block copolymer that can be used as a compatibilizer in cellulose fiber-reinforced biocomposites. It is an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), prepared with  ring-opening polymerization (ROP)1, and a shorter segment of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) synthesized with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)2. The PDMAEMA-part was prepared in one single length, while the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths. In the last synthesis step the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized, turning it into a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The block copolymers were then able to form cationic micelles in water, from where they can adsorb, under mild conditions, to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. A similar concept has been investigated earlier in a system fully prepared with ATRP3. Additionally, physical adsorption of micelles is a milder approach of attaching a polymer to a cellulose surface compared to more traditional covalent attachment4, making it an interesting option to use in industry. After adsorption, the surface had a more hydrophobic character shown with contact angle measurements, and with AFM force measurements, it was demonstrated that there is a clear entanglement behavior obtained between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is of importance for the information regarding the adhesive interface in a future biocomposite.

  • 8.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Physical Tuning of Cellulose-Polymer Interactions Utilizing Cationic Block Copolymers Based on PCL and Quaternized PDMAEMA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the aim was to prepare and evaluate a block copolymer that can be used as a compatabilizer in cellulose fiber-reinforced biocomposites. It as an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), made with  ring-opening polymerization (ROP), and a shorter segment of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) that was synthesized with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was made in one single length, while the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths; in total were three block copolymers prepared. In the last step of the synthesis, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized that turns it into a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The block copolymers were then able to form cationic micelles in water, from where they can adsorb, under mild conditions, to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. This provides the surface with a more hydrophobic character shown with contact angle measurements. Finally, with atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements, it was demonstrated that there is a clear entanglement behavior obtained between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is of importance for the information regarding the adhesive interface in a future biocomposite.

  • 9.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of a block copolymer compatibilizer for biocomposite applications2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the concept of using a free polymer as a compatibilzer in biocomposite applications has been evaluated with focus on the polymer poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), commonly used in conventional grafting onto/from cellulose. A block copolymer consisting of PCL and a shorter segment of poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The length of the PDMAEMA-part was kept constant, and the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. As a final step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized, which resulted in cationically charged chains –polyelectrolytes. The charged part could then be used as an electrostatic linker allowing the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto negatively charged cellulose model surfaces. Finally, these cellulose model surfaces were evaluated regarding for example amount of polymer adsorbed and hydrophobic character, investigated with techniques such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and contact angle measurements.

  • 10.
    Carlsson, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization from cellulose model surfaces monitored by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance2012In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 512-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer surface-grafting is an excellent method to modify the properties of a surface. However, surface-initiated polymerization is still relatively poorly understood due to the lack of appropriate characterization methods and tools to monitor the polymerizations. Herein, we report the in situ, surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) investigated in real time by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) technique. The polymerization was performed from a cellulose model surface and the polymerization was initiated directly from the available hydroxyl groups on the cellulose. The cyclic monomer 3-caprolactone and an organic catalyst, 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD), were used, and the reaction was performed in bulk at room temperature. Since a free polymer was formed in bulk in parallel to the grafting from the surface, the reaction was performed in three cycles with rinsing steps in between to measure only the effect of the surface grafting. The change in frequency showed that the grafted amount of polymer increased after each cycle indicating that most of the chain ends remained active. After polymer grafting, the cellulose model surface showed a more hydrophobic character, and the surface roughness of the cellulose model surface was reduced. This study clearly shows that QCM is a viable method to monitor SI-ROP in situ from cellulose surfaces. We believe this is an important step towards a deeper understanding of how to tailor the interface between polymer-modified cellulose and a polymer matrix in biocomposites.

  • 11.
    Ezekiel Mushi, Ngesa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nurani, Ghasem
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Soft, bio-inspired chitin/protein nanocomposites: mechanical behavior and interface interactions between recombinant resilin-like proteins and chitin nanofibersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ezekiel Mushi, Ngesa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured biocomposite films of high toughness based on native chitin nanofibers and chitosan2015In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 18, no 2, article id 99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitosan is widely used in films for packaging applications. Chitosan reinforcement by stiff particles or fibers is usually obtained at the expense of lowered ductility and toughness. Here, chitosan film reinforcement by a new type of native chitin nanofibers is reported. Films are prepared by casting from colloidal suspensions of chitin in dissolved chitosan. The nanocomposite films are chitin nanofiber networks in chitosan matrix. Characterization is carried out by dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, field emission scanning electron microscopy, tensile tests and dynamic mechanical analysis. The nanostructured biocomposite was produced in volume fractions of 0, 8, 22 and 56% chitin nanofibers. Favorable chitin-chitosan synergy for colloidal dispersion is demonstrated. Also, lowered moisture sorption is observed for the composites, probably due to the favorable chitin-chitosan interface. The highest toughness (area under stress-strain curve) was observed at 8 vol% chitin content. The toughening mechanisms and the need for well-dispersed chitin nanofibers is discussed. Finally, desired structural characteristics of ductile chitin biocomposites are discussed.

  • 13.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    The use of thin, tailored Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films to improve the mechanical properties of fibrous networks2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioinspired and highly oriented clay nanocomposites with a xyloglucan biopolymer matrix: Extending the range of mechanical and barrier properties2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of clay bionanocomposites requires processing routes with nanostructural control. Moreover, moisture durability is a concern with water-soluble biopolymers. Here, oriented bionanocomposite coatings with strong in-plane orientation of clay platelets are for the first time prepared by continuous water-based processing. Montmorillonite (MTM) and a "new" unmodified biological polymer (xyloglucan (XG)) are combined. The resulting nanocomposites are characterized by FE-SEM, TEM, and XRD. XG adsorption on MTM is measured by quartz crystal microbalance analysis. Mechanical and gas barrier properties are measured, also at high relative humidity. The reinforcement effects are modeled. XG dimensions in composites are estimated using atomistic simulations. The nanostructure shows highly oriented and intercalated clay platelets. The reinforcement efficiency and effects on barrier properties are remarkable and are likely to be due to highly oriented and well-dispersed MTM and strong XG-MTM interactions. Properties are well preserved in humid conditions and the reasons for this are discussed.

  • 15.
    Marais, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Towards a super-strainable paper using the Layer-by-Layer technique2014In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 100, p. 218-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Layer-by-Layer technique was used to build a polyelectrolyte multilayer on the surface of pulp fibres. The treated fibres were then used to prepare paper sheets and the mechanical properties of these sheets were evaluated as a function of the number of bi-layers on the fibres. Two different systems were studied: polyethyleneimine (PEI)/nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH)/hyaluronic acid (HA). Model experiments using dual polarization interferometry and SiO2 surfaces showed that the two systems gave different thicknesses for a given number of layers. The outer layer was found to be a key parameter in the PEI/NFC system, whereas it was less important in the PAH/HA system. The mechanical properties of the sheets made from the PAH/HA treated fibres were significantly greater than those made from untreated fibres, reaching 70 Nm/g in tensile index and 6.5% in strain at break. Such a modification could be very useful for 3D forming of paper, opening new perspectives in for example the packaging industry, with a renewable and biodegradable product as a potential substitute for some of the traditional oil-based plastics.

  • 16.
    Montañez, Maria I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Hed, Yvonne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ropponen, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bifunctional Dendronized Cellulose Surfaces as Biosensors2011In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 2114-2125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-defined dendronized cellulose substrates displaying multiple representations of dual-functionality were constructed by taking advantage of the efficiency of the click reaction combined with traditional anhydride chemistry. First, activated cellulose surfaces were decorated with several generations of dendrons, and their peripheral reactive groups were subsequently reacted with a trifunctional orthogonal monomer. The generated substrate tool box was successfully explored by accurately tuning the surface function using a versatile orthogonal dual postfunctionalization approach. In general, the reactions were monitored by using a click-dye reagent or a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, and the resulting surfaces were well-characterized using XPS, and contact angle measurements. Utilizing this approach two different surfaces have been obtained; that is, triethylenglycol oligomers and amoxicillin molecules were efficiently introduced to the dendritic surface. As a second example, mannose-decorated hydroxyl functional surfaces illustrated their potential as biosensors by multivalent detection of lectin protein at concentration as low as 5 nM.

  • 17.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Pendergraph, Samuel A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Robust and tailored wet adhesion in biopolymer thin film with wet adhesion and toughness superior to wet adhesion in bone2015In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pendergraph, Samuel A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Robust and Tailored Wet Adhesion in Biopolymer Thin Films2014In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 4420-4428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Model layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were fabricated in order to study their wet adhesive behavior. The film characteristics were investigated to understand the inherent structures during the assembly process. Subsequently, the adhesion of these systems was evaluated to understand the correlation between the structure of the film and the energy required to separate these LbL assemblies. We describe how the conditions of the LbL fabrication can be utilized to control the adhesion between films. The characteristics of the film formation are examined in the absence and presence of salt during the film formation. The dependence on contact time and LbL film thickness on the critical pull-off force and work of adhesion are discussed. Specifically, by introducing sodium chloride (NaCl) in the assembly process, the pull-off forces can be increased by a factor of 10 and the work of adhesion by 2 orders of magnitude. Adjusting both the contact time and the film thickness enables control of the adhesive properties within these limits. Based on these results, we discuss how the fabrication procedure can create tailored adhesive interfaces with properties surpassing analogous systems found in nature.

  • 19.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Bergström, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Adhesive and adsorption properties of a cationic amphiphilic block copolymer for use as compatibilizer in (bio)-composites2011In: EUPOC 2011, Biobased Polymers and Related Biomaterials, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The awareness of our need for a sustainable society has encouraged the search for renewable, high quality materials that can replace oil-based products. This has stimulated a lot of research where cellulosic fibres are combined with different types of polymer matrices to obtain more environmentally friendly composite materials. However, the compatibility between the different components in a composite, which is of decisive importance for its final properties, is a large problem in many systems today. In this work, the objective was to create a novel type of compatibilizer that can physically adsorb onto fibres to enhance the interaction between fibres and non-polar polymer matrices in fibre-reinforced composites, both by addressing surface energies and by introducing polymer entanglements at the interface. This physical route is much more convenient compared to covalent attachment since it can be performed in water under mild conditions and therefore does not require any use of organic solvents for the attachment of the compatibilizer. To achieve this, an amphiphilic block copolymer with one high molecular weight hydrophobic block (polystyrene, PS) and one cationic block (poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, PDMAEMA) was synthesized. Due to the cationic charges, the polymers adsorb to oppositely charged surfaces resulting in a measured contact angle close to that of many non-polar polymer matrices. The adhesion, (measured with atomic force microscopy, AFM, using the colloidal probe technique), of the surface with compatibilizer towards a non-polar PS-probe increased with increasing contact time, most probably due to polymer entanglements between the non-polar blocks at the treated surface and the probe. This demonstrates that the use of this type of novel amphiphilic block copolymer is a promising route to improve the compatibility between charged reinforcing materials such as cellulose-based fibres but also glass-fibres, nanoclay, nanofibrillated cellulose and other charged reinforcing materials, and hydrophobic matrices in composite materials. Limitations when designing new materials due to a lack in compatibility could in this way be addressed in an easy but effective way resulting in more environmentally friendly materials with improved mechanical properties.

  • 20.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Note: Particle adhesion and imaging of particle/surface breakage zone2012In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 106107-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An AFM methodology to enable measurement of the adhesion of micrometre sized objects, having contact areas in the range of nanometre to micrometer, is reported. The method also enables imaging of the actual breakage zone on both the surface and the removed object to obtain further information regarding the breakage zone. The method is also useful for measuring consolidating systems, such as drying, curing, or annealing systems.

  • 21.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Particle adhesion and imaging of particle/surface breakage zone2012In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, no 83, p. 106107-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An AFM methodology to enable measurement of the adhesion of micrometre sized objects, having contact areas in the range of nanometre to micrometer, is reported. The method also enables imaging of the actual breakage zone on both the surface and the removed object to obtain further information regarding the breakage zone. The method is also useful for measuring consolidating systems, such as drying, curing, or annealing systems.

  • 22.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Particle adhesion and imaging of particle/surface contact zone2011In: 25th ECIS (European Colloid and Interface Society meeting), 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The awareness of our need for a sustainable society has encouraged the search for renewable, high quality materials that can replace oil-based products. This has stimulated alternative research where cellulosic fibres are combined with different types of polymer matrices to obtain more environmentally friendly composite materials. However, the compatibility between the different components in a composite, which is imperative for the properties of the composite, is a large problem in many systems today. In this work, the objective is to evaluate an amphiphilic block copolymer with one high molecular weight hydrophobic block (polystyrene, PS) and one cationic block (poly(di¬methyl-amino)ethyl methacrylate, PDMAEMA), to be used as a compatibilizer between fibres and non-polar polymer matrices in fibre-reinforced composites. The purpose is both to affect the surface energy and to introducing polymer entanglement at the interface. The AFM colloidal probe technique was used to measure the adhesion which is acting in the present work. The adhesive force of a non-polar PS probe towards a surface covered with preadsorbed compatibilizer increased with increasing contact time, due to polymer entanglements between the non-polar blocks at the treated surface and the probe. Also the contact-zone between PS particles and compatibilizer surface was imaged with AFM. This was done by carefully removing pre-adhered PS particles with the aid of AFM cantilevers that was glued onto the particle in-situ followed by pulling. This also enables imaging of the contact zone on both the compatibilizer surface and on the PS particle.

  • 23.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Surface modification of cellulose-based fibres for use in advanced materials2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The awareness of our need for a sustainable society has encouraged the search for renewable, high quality materials that can replace oil-based products. This, in combination with increased competition in the forest industry, has stimulated a lot of research into different types of wood-based materials where cellulose-rich fibres are combined with different types of polymers. There is hence a large need to develop efficient fibre modification techniques by which the fibres can be tailored to obtain specific properties. Furthermore, by modifying only the surface of fibers a significant change in properties can be achieved although only a relatively small amount of the total fibre material is modified. The potential impact of a surface modification increases tremendously when nano-sized fibres are used due to the larger interfacial area between the fibres and their surroundings. Interest in smaller building blocks in the nanometer range has continued to grow rapidly in recent years due to both the availability and preparation/synthesis of smaller building blocks and to the discovery of the high performance of these types of nanocomposites. In this thesis, three different types of surface modifications are presented as new tools to design the properties of new novel cellulose-based materials. In the first work, thermoresponsive nanocomposites have been assembled from specially designed thermoresponsive polymers and nanofibrillated cellulose. The polymers have one thermoresponsive block and one cationically charged block which can thus attach the polymer to an oppositely charged fibre/fibril surface. Multilayers were assembled with these polymers and the nanofibrillated cellulose utilizing the layer-by-layer technique, resulting in thin films with thermoresponsive behavior which for example could be used for controlled drug-release applications. In the second work, an amphiphilic block copolymer with one high molecular weight hydrophobic polystyrene block and one cationic block was synthesized for use as a compatibilizer between fibres and hydrophobic polymer matrices in composites. These polymers self-assemble into micelles in water with the hydrophobic part in the core of the micelle and the cationic part in the shell. Due to the cationic charges, these micelles adsorb to oppositely charged surfaces where the hydrophobic parts can be liberated on the surface by a heat treatment, leading to a new, less hydrophilic, surface with a contact angle close to that of pure polystyrene. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the adhesive properties of a polymer-treated surface using a polystyrene probe at different temperatures and contact times. The adhesion increased with increasing contact time for the treated surfaces, probably due to entanglement between the polystyrene blocks at the treated surface and the probe. The relative increase in adhesion with contact time was higher at the lower temperature whereas the absolute value of the adhesion was higher at the higher temperature, most probably due to a larger molecular contact area. This odification technique could be utilized to make fibrebased composite materials with better mechanical properties. In the third work, click chemistry was used to covalently attach dendrons to cellulose surfaces and further to modify them with mannose groups to obtain specific interactions with  Concanavalin A. The protein interactions were studied at different protein concentrations with a quartz crystal microbalance. The multivalent dendronized surface showed a 10-fold increase in sensitivity to the protein compared to a monovalent reference surface. This could be used to design more sensitive cellulose-based biosensors in the future.

  • 24.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Surface Modification of Cellulose-based Materials for Tailoring of Interfacial Interactions2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The awareness of our need for a sustainable society has encouraged the search for renewable, high quality materials that can replace oil-based products. This, in combination with increased competition in the forest industry, has stimulated a lot of research into different types of wood-based materials where cellulose-rich fibers are combined with different types of polymers. There is hence a great need to develop efficient fiber modification techniques by which the fibers can be tailored to obtain specific properties. A significant change in properties can be achieved by modifying only the surface of fibers although only a relatively small amount of the total fiber material is modified. In this thesis, several surface modification techniques are presented as new tools to design the properties of different cellulose-based materials.

    In paper I, thermoresponsive nanocomposites have been assembled from specially designed thermoresponsive block copolymers and nanofibrillated cellulose. The block copolymers have one thermoresponsive block and one cationically charged block which can thus attach the polymer to an oppositely charged fiber/fibril surface. Multilayers were assembled with these block copolymers and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) utilizing the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique, resulting in thin films with a thermoresponsive behavior.

    In papers II and III, amphiphilic block copolymers with one less polar high molecular weight block and one cationic block were synthesized for use as a compatibilizer between fibers/fibrils and less polar polymer matrices in composites. The less polar block consisted of polystyrene (PS) in paper II and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) in paper III. These polymers self-assemble into cationic micelles in water which can adsorb to oppositely charged surfaces, such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils, in water under mild conditions and decrease the surface energy of the surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the adhesive properties of surfaces treated with these compatibilizers which clearly showed the formation of physical entanglements across the interfaces, which are essential for improved interfacial adhesion in the final composites. This modification technique could probably be utilized to make fiber-based composites with better mechanical properties. To be able to better compare this physical modification technique with a more traditional covalent grafting-from approach a method to measure attached amounts of grafted PCL onto cellulose model surfaces was developed in paper IV using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM).

    In paper V, multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were assembled using the LbL technique and surface structure, build-up and adhesive behavior of the multilayers were evaluated. AFM force measurements showed that a significant adhesion even at long separation distances between two surfaces treated with PAH/HA multilayers could be achieved due to extensive interdiffusion across the interface during contact, leading to significant disentanglement during separation. Fundamental parameters contributing to improved adhesion for this type of system have been evaluated and this knowledge could be used to improve cellulose-based fiber networks and possibly also other types of cellulose-based materials.

    In paper VI, click chemistry was used to covalently attach dendrons to cellulose surfaces and further modify them with mannose groups to obtain specific interactions with Concanavalin A. The protein interactions were studied at different protein concentrations with a QCM. The multivalent dendronized surface showed a 10-fold increase in sensitivity to the protein compared to a monovalent reference surface demonstrating greatly improved interfacial interactions. This approach could be used to improve interactions at different types of interfaces.

  • 25.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bruce, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Physical tuning of cellulose/polymer interactions utilizing cationic block copolymers based on poly(ε-caprolactone)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Bruce, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Physical tuning of cellulose-polymer interactions utilizing cationic block copolymers based on PCL and quaternized PDMAEMA2012In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 6796-6807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the objective was to synthesize and evaluate the properties of a compatibilizer based on poly(ε-caprolactone) aimed at tuning the surface properties of cellulose fibers used in fiber-reinforced biocomposites. The compatibilizer is an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of two different blocks which have different functions. One block is cationic, quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and can therefore electrostatically attach to anionic reinforcing materials such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils under mild conditions in water. The other block consists of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) which can decrease the surface energy of a cellulose surface and also has the ability to form physical entanglements with a PCL surface thereby improving the interfacial adhesion. Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) and Ring-Opening Polymerization (ROP) were used to synthesize three block copolymers with the same length of the cationic PDMAEMA block but with different lengths of the PCL blocks. The block copolymers form cationic micelles in water which can adsorb to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. After heat treatment, the contact angles of water on the treated surfaces increased significantly, and contact angles close to those of pure PCL were obtained for the block copolymers with longer PCL blocks. AFM force measurements showed a clear entangling behavior between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 C, which is important for the formation of an adhesive interface in the final biocomposites. This demonstrates that this type of amphiphilic block copolymer can be used to improve interactions in biocomposites between anionic reinforcing materials such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils and less polar matrices such as PCL.

  • 27.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergström, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Synthesis, adsorption and adhesive properties of a cationic amphiphilic block copolymer for use as compatibilizer in composites2012In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 1195-1204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the objective was to synthesize a compatibilizer that can electrostatically adsorb onto cellulose fibers, in fiber-based composites, to enhance the interaction between the fibers and non-polar polymer matrices. This physical route to attach the compatibilizer onto and thereby modify a fiber surface is convenient since it can be performed in water under mild conditions. Polystyrene (PS) was used for the high molecular weight, non-polar, block and poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA) was used as the polar block, which was subsequently quaternized to obtain cationic charges. The block copolymer self-assembles in water into cationic micelles and the adsorption to both silicon oxide surfaces and cellulose model surfaces was studied. The micelles spread out on the surface after heat treatment and contact angle measurements showed that the contact angles against water increased significantly after this treatment. AFM force measurements were performed with a PS probe to study the adhesive properties. The adhesion increased with increasing contact time for the treated surfaces, probably due to entanglements between the polystyrene blocks at the treated surface and the probe. This demonstrates that the use of this type of amphiphilic block copolymer is a promising route to improve the compatibility between charged reinforcing materials, such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils, and hydrophobic matrices in composite materials.

  • 28.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergström, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Synthesis, adsorption and adhesive properties of a cationic amphiphilic block copolymer for use as compatibilizer in composites2011In: ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY: volume 241, 2011, Vol. 241Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlsson, Linn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone from cellulose model surfaces monitored by quartz crystal microbalance2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work surface initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) of ɛ-caprolactone on cellulose model surfaces was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The polymerization was performed with the monomer, ɛ-caprolactone, in bulk with an organic catalyst, 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD), at room temperature with two different catalyst concentrations (0.5 mol% and 1 mol%). Initiation was done directly from the hydroxyl groups on the cellulose surface without any modification. A gold surface, which cannot initiate polymerization, was used as a reference surface which was connected in serial to the cellulose surface. This study shows that QCM is a viable technique to monitor SI-ROP of ɛ-caprolactone from cellulose surfaces. Grafting polymers from cellulose fibres/fibrils/whiskers has been an interesting way of increasing the compatibility between fibres/fibrils/whiskers and different matrices in biocomposites, and the QCM could therefore be an important tool to study and optimize the grafting of polymers, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), on cellulose surfaces.

  • 30.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carlsson, Linn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone from cellulose model surfaces monitored by quartz crystal microbalance2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Interactive nano fibrils2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Thermoresponsive nanocomposites from multilayers of nanofibrillated cellulose and specially designed N-isopropylacrylamide based polymers2010In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work positively charged polymers based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) have been synthesised and investigated in solution, on surfaces and in polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) in combination with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). Polymers having thermoresponsive properties at low salt concentrations in solution and when adsorbed onto surfaces were obtained by separating the charged groups from the thermoresponsive part in different blocks within the polymer. The polymers have been synthesised using atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP) of NIPAAm and (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (APTAC), which is the cationic monomer. All the block copolymers exhibited a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water between 35 and 39 degrees C and a positive correlation was found between the LCST and the charge densities of the polymers. It is shown that electrostatic interactions control the adsorption of the prepared polyelectrolytes to SiO2 surfaces and that the block copolymers are thermoresponsive when adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface. PEMs were also assembled with the synthesised polymers and NFC which is a renewable, fibrillar nanomaterial with interesting strength and biocompatibility properties. Even more interestingly it has been found that the formation of the layer-by-layer (LbL) structures of NFC and the block copolymers were demonstrated to have thermal responsivity. This type of thermoresponsive nanocomposite could be used as nano-containers for controlled release or for example in membranes where the permeability could be controlled by the temperature.

  • 33.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Montanez, Maria
    Hed, Yvonne
    Ropponen, Jarmo
    Malmström, Eva
    Wågberg, Lars
    Hult, Anders
    Malkoch, Michael
    Dendronized cellulose surfaces as biosensors2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Montañez, Maria I.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hed, Yvonne
    Ropponen, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    Tunable Bifunctional Dendronized Cellulose SurfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Control of wet adhesion between Layer-by-Layer covered surfaces by tailoring the structure and composition of the layersArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Controlling the wet adhesion between LbL (Layer-by-Layer) covered surfaces by controlling the structure and composition of the LbLsArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Utsel, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Surface modification of cellulose surfaces using multilayers of nano-sized latex particles2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Wågberg, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Use of thin, tailored Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films to increase the mechanical properties of fibrous networks2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Xie, Fei
    et al.
    Nylander, Tommy
    Piculell, Lennart
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Åkesson, Torbjörn
    Forsman, Jan
    Polyelectrolyte Adsorption on Solid Surfaces: Theoretical Predictions and Experimental Measurements2013In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 29, no 40, p. 12421-12431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work utilizes a combination of theory and experiments to explore the adsorption of two different cationic polyelectrolytes onto oppositely charged silica surfaces at pH 9. Both polymers, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), PDADMAC, and poly(4-vinyl N-methylpyridinium iodide), PVNP, are highly charged and highly soluble in water. Another important aspect is that a silica surface carries a relatively high surface charge density at this pH level. This means that we have specifically chosen to investigate adsorption under conditions where electrostatics can be expected to dominate the interactions. Of specific focus in this work is the response of the adsorption to the addition of simple salt (i.e., a process where electrostatics is gradually screened out). Theoretical predictions from a recently developed correlation-corrected classical density functional theory for polyelectrolytes are evaluated by direct quantitative comparisons with corresponding experimental data, as obtained by ellipsometry measurements. We find that, at low concentrations of simple salt, the adsorption increases with ionic strength, reaching a maximum at intermediate levels (about 200 mM). The adsorption then drops but retains a finite level even at very high salt concentrations, indicating the presence of nonelectrostatic contributions to the adsorption. In the theoretical treatment, the strength of this relatively modest but otherwise largely unknown nonelectrostatic surface affinity was estimated by matching predicted and experimental slopes of adsorption curves at high ionic strength. Given these estimates for the nonelectrostatic part, experimental adsorption data are essentially captured with quantitative accuracy by the classical density functional theory.

1 - 39 of 39
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