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  • 1.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ekener, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Moberg, Asa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Coroama, Vlad C.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    A framework for sustainability assessment of ICT futures Scenarios and sustainability impacts of future ICT-societies2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF ENVIROINFO AND ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2015, Atlantis Press , 2015, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) has an influence on all societal sectors and can have both positive and negative consequences. To support ICT for sustainability (ICT4S), we need to learn when and how ICT can enable sustainable development. It is important to take into account all types of potential impacts environmental and social, direct and indirect. Looking at future ICT societies and their potential environmental and social implications is of special interest, as this can provide valuable knowledge for planning and policy-making today to enable ICT4S. A methodological framework for environmental and social assessment of future ICT societies with a consumption perspective was developed as a part of a joint project with researchers at KTH, ICT industry, municipality and county. The overall goal of the project was to develop five different future scenarios for Swedish ICT societies and to assess the risks and opportunities for environmental and social consequences in those scenarios. This paper presents the framework for environmental and social assessment of future scenarios and discusses the challenges experienced and lessons learned in the process of the framework development. The framework is aimed to deal with a broad and complex object and scope of assessment, the inherent uncertainty and data restrictions of future scenarios, and is applying qualitative analysis.

  • 2.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Coroama, Vlad C.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekener, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Future ICT Societies – Environmental Opportunities and ChallengesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Coroama, Vlad C.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Assessing GHG Benefits Induced by ICT Services in Practice A Case Study and Resulting Challenges2016In: Proceedings of ICT for Sustainability 2016, Atlantis Press , 2016, p. 29-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High expectations are placed on the ability of ICT to play an important role in reducing GHG emissions, now and in the future. Several calculations of such benefits were put forward over the last years, usually performed by the industry. Their methods and assumptions, however, remained often unspecified, and the assessments frequently led to hardly plausible claims. In this paper, we present the results of applying a stricter approach to one specific service - the detection of gas leakages in the US through gas sensors installed on Google street view cars, together with an advanced algorithm for translating the collected data to useful information on the location and magnitude of gas leakages. We further discuss a new set of four practical challenges for such assessments that were identified during this exercise, and which are new compared to previous theoretical work: the allocation between ICT and non-ICT sectors, practical challenges in defining the baseline, the usually polluted indirect data at hand, and issues of the generalisation to society-wide potentials. We then discuss to which extent these challenges can be addressed, and which of them are of a more fundamental nature.

  • 4. Malmodin, Jens
    et al.
    Coroama, Vlad
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Assessing ICT's enabling effect through case study extrapolation the example of smart metering2016In: 2016 Electronics Goes Green 2016+, EGG 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, article id 7829814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, numerous studies estimated the potential environmental benefits of ICT products and services. These studies usually extrapolate the results of small case studies to society-wide potentials. We analyse one of the most popular ICT services envisioned to induce such benefits, smart metering. Reviewing existing pilot studies, we establish an inverse correlation between the size of the case study and the resulted average energy reductions, casting a shadow over such extrapolations. We discuss several possible reasons for this inverse correlation, most importantly the representativeness of the case study. We also estimate the own life-cycle impact of smart meters, another topic often ignored in the literature. Building on these insights, we then present three own future scenarios for smart metering, which analyse the potential for energy and emission reductions in Sweden, the EU, the US and the world.

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