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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Remnestål, Julia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nellgård, B.
    Vunk, Helian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Kotol, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Ilag, L. L.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Blennow, K.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Development of parallel reaction monitoring assays for cerebrospinal fluid proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease2019In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 494, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed knowledge of protein changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) across healthy and diseased individuals would provide a better understanding of the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we selected 20 brain-enriched proteins previously identified in CSF by antibody suspension bead arrays (SBA) to be potentially biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and verified these using an orthogonal approach. We examined the same set of 94 CSF samples from patients affected by AD (including preclinical and prodromal), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), non-AD dementia and healthy individuals, which had previously been analyzed by SBA. Twenty-eight parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assays were developed and 13 of them could be validated for protein quantification. Antibody profiles were verified by PRM. For seven proteins, the antibody profiles were highly correlated with the PRM results (r > 0.7) and GAP43, VCAM1 and PSAP were identified as potential markers of preclinical AD. In conclusion, we demonstrate the usefulness of targeted mass spectrometry as a tool for the orthogonal verification of antibody profiling data, suggesting that these complementary methods can be successfully applied for comprehensive exploration of CSF protein levels in neurodegenerative disorders.

  • 2.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody profiling in multiple sclerosis using arrays of human protein fragments2013In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2657-2672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire with large antigen collections is emerging as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for autoimmune diseases. Here, a systematic and undirected approach was taken to screen for profiles of IgG in human plasma from 90 individuals with multiple sclerosis related diagnoses. Reactivity pattern of 11,520 protein fragments (representing ̃38% of all human protein encoding genes) were generated on planar protein microarrays built within the Human Protein Atlas. For more than 2,000 antigens IgG reactivity was observed, among which 64% were found only in single individuals. We used reactivity distributions among multiple sclerosis subgroups to select 384 antigens, which were then reevaluated on planar microarrays, corroborated with suspension bead arrays in a larger cohort (n = 376) and confirmed for specificity in inhibition assays. Among the heterogeneous pattern within and across multiple sclerosis subtypes, differences in recognition frequencies were found for 51 antigens, which were enriched for proteins of transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, using protein fragments and complementary high-throughput protein array platforms facilitated an alternative route to discovery and verification of potentially disease-associated autoimmunity signatures, that are now proposed as additional antigens for large-scale validation studies across multiple sclerosis biobanks.

  • 3.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Igel, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Systematic antibody and antigen-based proteomic profiling with microarrays2011In: EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS, ISSN 1473-7159, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 219-234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current approaches within affinity-based proteomics are driven both by the accessibility and availability of antigens and capture reagents, and by suitable multiplexed technologies onto which these are implemented. By combining planar microarrays and other multiparallel systems with sets of reagents, possibilities to discover new and unpredicted protein disease associations, either via directed hypothesis-driven or via undirected hypothesis-generating target selection, can be created. In the following stages, the discoveries made during these screening phases have to be verified for potential clinical relevance based on both technical and biological aspects. The use of affinity tools throughout discovery and verification has the potential to streamline the introduction of new markers, as transition into clinically required assay formats appears straightforward. In this article, we summarize some of the current building blocks within array-and affinity-based proteomic profiling with a focus on body fluids, by giving a perspective on how current and upcoming developments in this bioscience could enable a path of pursuit for biomarker discovery.

  • 4.
    Bedri, Sahl Khalid
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Ola B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Advice Foretagsassistans & Stockholm AB, TCER AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hamsten, Carl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Manouchehrinia, Ali
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grönlund, Hans
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Glaser, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Plasma protein profiling reveals candidate biomarkers for multiple sclerosis treatment2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0217208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment options have improved significantly over the past decades, but the consequences of MS can still be devastating and the needs for monitoring treatment surveillance are considerable. In the current study we used affinity proteomics technology to identify potential biomarkers which could ultimately be used to as facilitate treatment decisions. We profiled the intra-individual changes in the levels of 59 target proteins using an antibody suspension bead array in serial plasma samples from 44 MS patients during treatment with natalizumab followed by fingolimod. Nine proteins showed decreasing plasma levels during natalizumab treatment, with PEBP1 and RTN3 displaying the most significant changes. Protein levels remained stable during fingolimod treatment for both proteins. The decreasing PEBP1 levels during natalizumab treatment could be validated using ELISA and replicated in an independent cohort. These results support the use of this technology as a high throughput method of identifying potentially useful biomarkers of MS treatment.

  • 5.
    Byström, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    et al.,
    Affinity Proteomic Profiling of Plasma, Cerebrospinal Fluid, and Brain Tissue within Multiple Sclerosis2014In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 4607-4619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain is a vital organ and because it is well shielded from the outside environment, possibilities for noninvasive analysis are often limited. Instead, fluids taken from the spinal cord or circulatory system are preferred sources for the discovery of candidate markers within neurological diseases. In the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), we applied an affinity proteomic strategy and screened 22 plasma samples with 4595 antibodies (3450 genes) on bead arrays, then defined 375 antibodies (334 genes) for targeted analysis in a set of 172 samples and finally used 101 antibodies (43 genes) on 443 plasma as well as 573 cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF) samples. This revealed alteration of protein profiles in relation to MS subtypes for IRF8, IL7, METTL14, SLC30A7, and GAP43. Respective antibodies were subsequently used for immunofluorescence on human post-mortem brain tissue with MS pathology for expression and association analysis. There, antibodies for IRF8, IL7, and METTL14 stained neurons in proximity of lesions, which highlighted these candidate protein targets for further studies within MS and brain tissue. The affinity proteomic translation of profiles discovered by profiling human body fluids and tissue provides a powerful strategy to suggest additional candidates to studies of neurological disorders.

  • 6.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pin, Elisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tamburro, Davide
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics2016In: Expert Review of Proteomics, ISSN 1478-9450, E-ISSN 1744-8387, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 83-98Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field's current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics.

  • 7. Hamsten, Carl
    et al.
    Wiklundh, Emil
    Gronlund, Hans
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eklund, Anders
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Grunewald, Johan
    Haggmark-Manberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Elevated levels of FN1 and CCL2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from sarcoidosis patients2016In: Respiratory Research, ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 17, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous systemic inflammatory disease in which more than 90 % of all patients develop pulmonary manifestations. Several gene associations have previously been described, but established and clinically useful biomarkers are still absent. This study aimed to find proteins in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid that can be associated with the disease. Methods: We developed and performed profiling of 94 selected proteins in BAL fluid and serum samples obtained from newly diagnosed and non-treated patients with sarcoidosis. Using multiplexed immunoassays, a total of 317 BAL and 217 serum samples were analyzed, including asthmatic patients and healthy individuals as controls. Results: Our analyses revealed increased levels of eight proteins in sarcoidosis patients compared to controls. Out of these, fibronectin (FN1) and C-C motif chemokine 2 (CCL2) revealed the strongest associations. In addition, cadherin 5 (CDH5) was found to correlate positively with lymphocyte cell numbers in BAL fluid. Conclusions: Applying a high throughput proteomics screening technique, we found proteins of potential clinical relevance in the context of sarcoidosis.

  • 8.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neuroproteomic profiling of human body fluids2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis provides results from affinity based studies where human body fluids were profiled to find markers for neurological diseases. Both proteins and autoantibodies were analysed using microarray technologies that can profile hundreds of analytes and hundreds of samples in parallel using small sample volumes. A central element in this work was to develop and apply new methods to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is the fluid in direct contact with the brain. CSF contains proteins reflecting the physiological state of the central nervous system and therefore offers a unique insight into proteins associated to neurological disorders. As a complement to CSF, bloodderived samples such as serum and plasma, were also investigated as these represent potential sources of disease related proteins. The work presented here summarises the development of assay protocols to study protein and autoantibodies in CSF and blood using planar and bead-based microarrays.

    In Paper I, an antibody-based protocol was developed to enable multiplexed protein profiling in CSF. The protocol was then applied for a first analysis within multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In Paper II, the results were further evaluated in additional CSF as well as plasma samples. Based on the CSF analysis we found two proteins associated to MS; GAP43, a protein related to disease progression and SERPINA3, a protein involved in inflammation. In addition, four other proteins; IRF8, METTL14, IL7 and SLC30A7, were found to have altered plasma levels between the patient groups. The expression of these proteins were further investigated by immunofluorescent staining of human brain tissue, revealing differential localisation of proteins in diseased and healthy brain. In Paper III, a study on extensive protein profiling of plasma in the context of another neurodegenerative disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is described. The levels of three proteins, namely NEFM, RGS18 and SCL25A20, were found to be elevated in ALS patients compared to controls. Among these, NEFM also indicated association to disease subtype as the levels were elevated in patients with definite compared to suspected diagnosis.

    In addition to antibodies, we also utilised antigens on microarrays to screen for the presence of autoantibodies in body fluids. In Paper IV, a strategy for this analysis was developed using protein fragments and two types of microarrays. This strategy was then applied for profiling of the autoantibody repertoire of MS patients, revealing 51 protein fragments with potential disease relevance. Interestingly, comparison of plasma and CSF samples obtained from the same patients indicated high concordance of antibodies between the two body fluids. In Paper V, a similar strategy was applied to narcolepsy, another neurological disorder. Our investigation of antibodies in serum revealed higher reactivity towards METTL22, NT5C1A and TMEM134 compared to controls in two independent sample materials.

    In conclusion, the presented work constitutes a framework of proteomic assays for enhanced exploration of proteins and autoantibodies in neuroscience. Moreover, we have reported identification of several potential disease markers to be further investigated within neurological disorders.

  • 9.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Bradley, Frideborg
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Guthrie, Brandon L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Washington, DC USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol Hlth, Washington, DC USA..
    Birse, Kenzie
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Noel-Romas, Laura
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SciLifeLab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bosire, Rose
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kiarie, James
    Univ Nairobi, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Farquhar, Carey
    Univ Washington, Dept Med Global Hlth & Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Burgener, Adam D.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A High-throughput Bead-based Affinity Assay Enables Analysis of Genital Protein Signatures in Women At Risk of HIV Infection2019In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 461-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women at high risk of HIV infection, including sex workers and those with active genital inflammation, have molecular signatures of immune activation and epithelial barrier remodeling in samples of their genital mucosa. These alterations in the local immunological milieu are likely to impact HIV susceptibility. We here analyze host genital protein signatures in HIV uninfected women, with high frequency of condom use, living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. Cervicovaginal secretions from women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships (n = 62) were collected at three time points over 12 months. Women living in HIV-negative seroconcordant relationships (controls, n = 25) were sampled at one time point. All study subjects were examined for demographic parameters associated with susceptibility to HIV infection. The cervicovaginal samples were analyzed using a high-throughput bead-based affinity assay. Proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation were increased in HIV-serodiscordant women. By combining several methods of analysis, a total of five proteins (CAPG, KLK10, SPRR3, elafin/PI3, CSTB) were consistently associated with this study group. Proteins analyzed using the affinity set-up were further validated by label-free tandem mass spectrometry in a partially overlapping cohort with concordant results. Women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships thus had elevated levels of proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation despite low prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and a high frequency of safe sex practices. The identified proteins are important markers to follow during assessment of mucosal HIV susceptibility factors and a high-throughput bead-based affinity set-up could be a suitable method for such evaluation.

  • 10.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Antibody-based profiling of cerebrospinal fluid within multiple sclerosis2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 15, p. 2256-2267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody suspension bead arrays have proven to enable multiplexed and high-throughput protein profiling in unfractionated plasma and serum samples through a direct labeling approach. We here describe the development and application of an assay for protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While setting up the assay, systematic intensity differences between sample groups were observed that reflected inherent sample specific total protein amounts. Supplementing the labeling reaction with BSA and IgG diminished these differences without impairing the apparent sensitivity of the assay. We also assessed the effects of heat treatment on the analysis of CSF proteins and applied the assay to profile 43 selected proteins by 101 antibodies in 339 CSF samples from a multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort. Two proteins, GAP43 and SERPINA3 were found to have a discriminating potential with altered intensity levels between sample groups. GAP43 was detected at significantly lower levels in secondary progressive MS compared to early stages of MS and the control group of other neurological diseases. SERPINA3 instead was detected at higher levels in all MS patients compared to controls. The developed assay procedure now offers new possibilities for broad-scale protein profiling of CSF within neurological disorders.

  • 11.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hamsten, Carl
    Wiklundh, Emil
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Gronlund, Hans
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eklund, Anders
    Grunewald, Johan
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Proteomic Profiling Reveals Autoimmune Targets in Sarcoidosis2015In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 191, no 5, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: There is a need to further characterize the antibody repertoire in relation to sarcoidosis and potentially related autoantigens. Objectives: We investigated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum samples from patients with sarcoidosis and healthy and diseased control subjects to discover sarcoidosis-associated autoantigens. Methods: Antigen microarrays built on 3,072 protein fragments were used to screen for IgG reactivity in 73 BAL samples from subjects with sarcoidosis, subjects with asthma, and healthy subjects. A set of 131 targets were selected for subsequent verification on suspension bead arrays using 272 additional BAL samples and 141 paired sera. Reactivity to four antigens was furthermore analyzed in 22 unprocessed BAL samples from patients with fibrosis and 269 plasma samples from patients diagnosed with myositis. Measurements and Main Results: Reactivity toward zinc finger protein 688 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L43 were discovered with higher frequencies in patients with sarcoidosis, for mitochondrial ribosomal protein L43 especially in patients with non-Lofgren syndrome. Increased reactivity toward nuclear receptor coactivator 2 was also observed in patients with non-Lofgren syndrome as compared with patients with Lofgren syndrome. The antigen representing adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factor GTPase activating protein 1 revealed high reactivity frequency in all sample groups but with significantly higher level of IgG reactivities in patients with sarcoidosis. Conclusions: Autoantigen reactivity was present in most BAL and serum samples analyzed, and the results revealed high interindividual heterogeneity, with most of the reactivities observed in single individuals only. Four proteins are here proposed as sarcoidosis-associated autoimmune targets and of interest for further validation in independent cohorts.

  • 12.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mohsenchian, Atefeh
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gajewska, Beata
    Baranczyk-Kuzma, Anna
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Plasma profiling revelas three proteins associated to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2014In: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, ISSN 2328-9503, Vol. 1, no 8, p. 544-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult motor neuron disease leading to muscular paralysis and death within 3-5 years from onset. Currently, there are no reliable and sensitive markers able to substantially shorten the diagnosis delay. The objective of the study was to analyze a large number of proteins in plasma from patients with various clinical phenotypes of ALS in search for novel proteins or protein profiles that could serve as potential indicators of disease.

    METHODS: Affinity proteomics in the form of antibody suspension bead arrays were applied to profile plasma samples from 367 ALS patients and 101 controls. The plasma protein content was directly labeled and protein profiles obtained using 352 antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas targeting 278 proteins. A focused bead array was then built to further profile eight selected protein targets in all available samples.

    RESULTS: Disease-associated significant differences were observed and replicated for profiles from antibodies targeting the proteins: neurofilament medium polypeptide (NEFM), solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A20), and regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18).

    INTERPRETATION: Upon further validation in several independent cohorts with inclusion of a broad range of other neurological disorders as controls, the alterations of these three protein profiles in plasma could potentially provide new molecular markers of disease that contribute to the quest of understanding ALS pathology.

  • 13.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Classification of protein profiles from antibody microarrays using heat and detergent treatment.2011In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays offer new opportunities for exploring the proteome and to identify biomarker candidates in human serum and plasma. Here, we have investigated the effect of heat and detergents on an antibody-based suspension bead array (SBA) assay using polyclonal antibodies and biotinylated plasma samples. With protein profiles from more than 2300 antibodies generated in 384-plex antibody SBAs, three major classes of heat and detergent susceptibility could be described. The results show that washing of the beads with SDS (rather than Tween) after target binding lowered intensity levels of basically all profiles and that about 50% of the profiles appeared to be lowered to a similar extent by heating of the sample. About 33% of the profiles appeared to be insensitive to heat treatment while another 17% showed a positive influence of heat to yield elevated profiles. The results suggest that the classification of antibodies is driven by the molecular properties of the antibody-antigen interaction and can generally not be predicted based on protein class or Western blot data. The experimental scheme presented here can be used to systematically categorize antibodies and thereby combine antibodies with similar properties into targeted arrays for analysis of plasma and serum.

  • 14.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neuroproteomic profiling of human body fluids2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 485-502Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of protein expression and abundance provides a possibility to extend the current knowledge on disease-associated processes and pathways. The human brain is a complex organ and dysfunction or damage can give rise to a variety of neurological diseases. Although many proteins potentially reflecting disease progress are originating from brain, the scarce availability of human tissue material has lead to utilization of body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood in disease-related research. Within the most common neurological disorders, much effort has been spent on studying the role of a few hallmark proteins in disease pathogenesis but despite extensive investigation, the signatures they provide seem insufficient to fully understand and predict disease progress. In order to expand the view the field of neuroproteomics has lately emerged alongside developing technologies, such as affinity proteomics and mass spectrometry, for multiplexed and high-throughput protein profiling. Here, we provide an overview of how such technologies have been applied to study neurological disease and we also discuss some important considerations concerning discovery of disease-associated profiles.

  • 15.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody targets in vaccine-associated narcolepsyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neuroproteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by multiplexed affinity arrays2017In: Neuroproteomics: Methods and Protocols, Humana Press, 2017, p. 247-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein profiling through affinity proteomic approaches represents a powerful strategy for the analysis of human body fluids. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being the fluid proximal to the central nervous system, is commonly analyzed in the context of neurological diseases, and can offer novel insights into the physiological state of the brain. Ultimately, and by analyzing the presence of brain-derived proteins in larger sets of samples that represent different phenotypes, profiling of CSF may serve as an important source to discover and verify disease-associated markers. Here, we describe a multiplexed and flexible protein profiling approach using antibody-based assays on suspension bead arrays. Through streamlined sample processing, protein biotinylation, and single-binder assay readout, this method enables high-throughput neuroproteomic analysis of up to 384 proteins in 384 samples.

  • 17.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Bomfim, Izaura Lima
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen
    Hallböök, Tove
    Darin, Niklas
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Partinen, Markku
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody targets in vaccine-associated narcolepsy2016In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 421-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with a yet unknown cause, but the specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons together with a strong human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association has led to the hypothesis that autoimmune mechanisms might be involved. Here, we describe an extensive effort to profile autoimmunity repertoires in serum with the aim to find disease-related autoantigens. Initially, 57 serum samples from vaccine-associated and sporadic narcolepsy patients and controls were screened for IgG reactivity towards 10 846 fragments of human proteins using planar microarrays. The discovered differential reactivities were verified on suspension bead arrays in the same sample collection followed by further investigation of 14 antigens in 176 independent samples, including 57 narcolepsy patients. Among these 14 antigens, methyltransferase-like 22 (METTL22) and 5'-nucleotidase cytosolic IA (NT5C1A) were recognized at a higher frequency in narcolepsy patients of both sample sets. Upon sequence analysis of the 14 proteins, polymerase family, member 3 (PARP3), acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 7 (ARID4B), glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 1 (CDKL1) were found to contain amino acid sequences with homology to proteins found in the H1N1 vaccine. These findings could become useful elements of further clinical assays that aim towards a better phenotypic understanding of narcolepsy and its triggers.

  • 18.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carlström, Eva Lindholm
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Towards Molecular Insights Into Psychiatric Disorders Using Affinity Proteomics2018In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 44, p. S223-S223Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Stockmeier, Craig
    Rajkowska, Grazyna
    Mulder, Jan
    Feuk, Lars
    Cunningham, Janet
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Lindholm Carlström, Eva
    Exploring autoantibody signatures in brain tissue lysates from patients with schizophreniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Burman, Joachim
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Cunningham, Janet
    Exploring the autoantibody repertoire in patients with obsessive compulsive disorderManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21. Khoonsari, Payam Emami
    et al.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lonnberg, Maria
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kilander, Lena
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kultima, Kim
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0150672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer's disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer's disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer's disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system.

  • 22.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arasch
    KTH.
    Wingard, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Hanna
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Sjostedt, Evelina
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Just, David
    KTH.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH.
    Norbeck, Oscar
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Owe-Larsson, Bjorn
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH.
    Searching for Novel Autoantibodies with Clinical Relevance in Psychiatric Disorders2018In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 44, p. S120-S121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Remnestål, Julia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mulder, Jan
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kultima, Kim
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Kilander, Lena
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Svenningsson, Per
    Nellgard, Bengt
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    CSF profiling of the human brain enriched proteome reveals associations of neuromodulin and neurogranin to Alzheimer's disease2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1242-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study is part of a larger effort aiming to expand the knowledge of brain-enriched proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and to provide novel insight into the relation between such proteins and different neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental design: Here 280 brain-enriched proteins in CSF from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are profiled. In total, 441 human samples of ventricular CSF collected post mortem and lumbar CSF collected ante mortem are analyzed using 376 antibodies in a suspension bead array setup, utilizing a direct labelling approach. Results: Among several proteins displaying differentiated profiles between sample groups, we focus here on two synaptic proteins, neuromodulin (GAP43) and neurogranin (NRGN). They are both found at elevated levels in CSF from AD patients in two independent cohorts, providing disease-associated profiles in addition to verifying and strengthening previously observed patterns. Increased levels are also observed for patients for whom the AD diagnosis was not established at the time of sampling. Conclusions and clinical relevance: These findings indicate that analyzing the brain-enriched proteins in CSF is of particular interest to increase the understanding of the CSF proteome and its relation to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, this study lends support to the notion that measurements of these synaptic proteins could potentially be of great relevance in future diagnostic tests for AD.

  • 24. Sjöstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mulder, Jan
    Defining the Human Brain Proteome Using Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling with a Focus on the Cerebral Cortex2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id UNSP e0130028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mammalian brain is a complex organ composed of many specialized cells, harboring sets of both common, widely distributed, as well as specialized and discretely localized proteins. Here we focus on the human brain, utilizing transcriptomics and public available Human Protein Atlas (HPA) data to analyze brain-enriched (frontal cortex) polyadenylated messenger RNA and long non-coding RNA and generate a genome-wide draft of global and cellular expression patterns of the brain. Based on transcriptomics analysis of altogether 27 tissues, we have estimated that approximately 3% (n=571) of all protein coding genes and 13% (n=87) of the long non-coding genes expressed in the human brain are enriched, having at least five times higher expression levels in brain as compared to any of the other analyzed peripheral tissues. Based on gene ontology analysis and detailed annotation using antibody-based tissue micro array analysis of the corresponding proteins, we found the majority of brain-enriched protein coding genes to be expressed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes or in neurons with molecular properties linked to synaptic transmission and brain development. Detailed analysis of the transcripts and the genetic landscape of brainenriched coding and non-coding genes revealed brain-enriched splice variants. Several clusters of neighboring brain-enriched genes were also identified, suggesting regulation of gene expression on the chromatin level. This multi-angle approach uncovered the brainenriched transcriptome and linked genes to cell types and functions, providing novel insights into the molecular foundation of this highly specialized organ.

  • 25. Thelin, Eric Peter
    et al.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frostell, Arvid
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Risling, Mårten
    Svensson, Mikael
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bellander, Bo-Michael
    Protein profiling in serum after traumatic brain injury in rats reveals potential injury markers2018In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 340, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The serum proteome following traumatic brain injury (TBI) could provide information for outcome prediction and injury monitoring. The aim with this affinity proteomic study was to identify serum proteins over time and between normoxic and hypoxic conditions in focal TBI. Material and methods: Sprague Dawley rats (n = 73) received a 3 mm deep controlled cortical impact ("severe injury"). Following injury, the rats inhaled either a normoxic (22% O-2) or hypoxic (11% O-2) air mixture for 30 min before resuscitation. The rats were sacrificed at day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after trauma. A total of 204 antibodies targeting 143 unique proteins of interest in TBI research, were selected. The sample proteome was analyzed in a suspension bead array set-up. Comparative statistics and factor analysis were used to detect differences as well as variance in the data. Results: We found that complement factor 9 (C9), complement factor B (CFB) and aldolase c (ALDOC) were detected at higher levels the first days after trauma. In contrast, hypoxia inducing factor (HIF)1 alpha, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and WBSCR17 increased over the subsequent weeks. S100A9 levels were higher in hypoxic-compared to normoxic rats, together with a majority of the analyzed proteins, albeit few reached statistical significance. The principal component analysis revealed a variance in the data, highlighting clusters of proteins. Conclusions: Protein profiling of serum following TBI using an antibody based microarray revealed temporal changes of several proteins over an extended period of up to four weeks. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  • 26.
    Zandian, Arash
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Whole-Proteome Peptide Microarrays for Profiling Autoantibody Repertoires within Multiple Sclerosis and Narcolepsy2017In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1300-1314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. To unravel the autoimmune processes across diseases, comprehensive and unbiased analyses of proteins targets recognized by the adaptive immune system are needed. Here we present an approach starting from high-density peptide arrays to characterize autoantibody repertoires and to identify new autoantigens. A set of ten plasma and serum samples from subjects with multiple sclerosis, narcolepsy, and without any disease diagnosis were profiled on a peptide array representing the whole proteome, hosting 2.2 million 12-mer peptides with a six amino acid lateral shift. On the basis of the IgG reactivities found on these whole-proteome peptide micro arrays, a set of 23 samples was then studied on a targeted array with 174 000 12-mer peptides of single amino acid lateral shift. Finally, verification of IgG reactivities was conducted with a larger sample set (n = 448) using the bead-based peptide microarrays. The presented workflow employed three different peptide microarray formats to discover and resolve the epitopes of human autoantibodies and revealed two potentially new autoantigens: MAP3K7 in multiple sclerosis and NRXN1 in narcolepsy. The presented strategy provides insights into antibody repertoire reactivity at a peptide level and may accelerate the discovery and validation of autoantigens in human diseases.

  • 27.
    Zandian, Arash
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wingård, L.
    Nilsson, H.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Johansson, D. X.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Norbeck, O.
    Owe-Larsson, B.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Persson, M. A. A.
    Untargeted screening for novel autoantibodies with prognostic value in first-episode psychosis2017In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 7, article id e1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunological and inflammatory reactions have been suggested to have a role in the development of schizophrenia, a hypothesis that has recently been supported by genetic data. The aim of our study was to perform an unbiased search for autoantibodies in patients with a first psychotic episode, and to explore the association between any seroreactivity and the development of a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) disorder characterized by chronic or relapsing psychotic symptoms. We collected plasma samples from 53 patients when they were treated for their first-episode psychosis, and 41 non-psychotic controls, after which the patients were followed for a mean duration of 7 years. Thirty patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia, delusional disorder, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder or a long-term unspecified nonorganic psychosis during follow-up, whereas 23 patients achieved complete remission. At the end of follow-up, plasma samples were analyzed for IgG reactivity to 2304 fragments of human proteins using a multiplexed affinity proteomic technique. Eight patient samples showed autoreactivity to the N-terminal fragment of the PAGE (P antigen) protein family (PAGE2B/PAGE2/PAGE5), whereas no such autoreactivity was seen among the controls. PAGE autoreactivity was associated with a significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia during follow-up (odds ratio 6.7, relative risk 4.6). An immunohistochemistry analysis using antisera raised against the N-terminal fragment stained an unknown extracellular target in human cortical brain tissue. Our findings suggest that autoreactivity to the N-terminal portion of the PAGE protein family is associated with schizophrenia in a subset of patients with first-episode psychosis.

1 - 27 of 27
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