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  • 1.
    Andersin, Michael
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Power control and Admission Control in Cellular Radio Systems1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Frodigh, Magnus
    Ericsson Radio Systems.
    Sunell, Kai-Erik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Distributed Radio Resource Allocation in Highway Microcellular Systems1996In: Wireless information networks: Architecture, resource management, and mobile data, 1996, p. 117-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Mandayam, Narayan B.
    Wireless Information Network Laboratory (WINLAB), Rutgers University.
    Yates, Roy D.
    Wireless Information Network Laboratory (WINLAB), Rutgers University.
    Subspace based estimation of the signal to interference ratio for TDMA cellular systems1998In: Wireless networks, ISSN 1022-0038, E-ISSN 1572-8196, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Signal-to-Interference Ratio (SIR) has been highlighted in the literature to be a most efficient criterion for several methods aiming at reducing the effects of cochannel interference, e.g., diversity reception, dynamic channel allocation and power control. In this paper we address the problem of how to obtain fast and accurate measurements of this parameter in a practical context. We develop a general SIR estimation technique for narrow-band cellular systems that is based on a signal subspace approach using the sample covariance matrix of the received signal. Simulation results using the frame structure in the GSM system show that the SIR can be estimated to within an error of 0.3 dB after only 200 ms, or within an error of 0.1 dB after only 0.6 seconds.

  • 4.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Time Variant Power Control in Cellular Networks1996In: Proceedings of the 1996 7th IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, PIMRC'96, IEEE , 1996, p. 193-197Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the transmission power control in a cellular network where users' mobility results in a time varying gain matrix. A framework for evaluating the channel quality is specified, and an asymptotic representation of the link gain evolution in time is obtained. Then, a time variant distributed constrained power control (TVPC) which copes with user mobility is derived. The algorithm is compared to a classical distributed constrained power control (DCPC), as well as to a constant-received power control and constant-transmitted power. The comparison reveals that the classical DCPC exhibits an outage probability close to one, unless some counter-measures are taken. The TVPC algorithm however, copes well with users' mobility and provides a close to optimal scale up factor for the signal to interference ratio (SIR) target.

  • 5.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Transmission power cost of mobility in cellular networks1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the transmission power control in a cellular network where users mobility results  in a time varying gain matrix. A framework for evaluating the channel quality is specified,  and an asymptotic representation of the link gain evolution in time is obtained. Then, a  variant of a standard Distributed Constrained Power Control (DCPC) which copes with  user mobility is derived. These two power controls, as well as constant­received power and  constant­transmitted power controls are compared with respect to their outage probabilities  in a Manhattan­like microcellular system. The comparison reveals that the classical DCPC  algorithm has an outage probability close to one, unless some counter­measures are taken.  The time variant algorithm however, copes well with users mobility and provides a close to  an optimal scale up factor for the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) target. Furthermore, the  time variant algorithm provides a substantial improvement in spectrum utilization compared  to the other algorithms above.

  • 6.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Distributed Discrete Power Control in Cellular PCS1998In: Wireless personal communications, ISSN 0929-6212, E-ISSN 1572-834X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 211-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transmitter power control has proven to be an efficient method to control cochannel interference in cellular PCS, and to increase bandwidth utilization. Power control can also improve channel quality, lower the power consumption, and facilitate network management functions such as mobile removals, hand-off and admission control. Most of the previous studies have assumed that the transmitter power level is controlled in a continuous domain, whereas in digitally power controlled systems, power levels are discrete. In this paper we study the transmitter power control problem using only a finite set of discrete power levels. The optimal discrete power vector is characterized, and a Distributed Discrete Power Control (DDPC) algorithm which converges to it, is presented. The impact of the power level grid on the outage probability is also investigated. A microcellular case study is used to evaluate the outage probabilities of the algorithms.<

  • 7.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Teleinformatics.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Teleinformatics.
    Gradual removals in cellular PCS with constrained power control and noise1995In: IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, PIMRC, 1995, p. 56-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study the mobile removal problem in a cellular PCS network where transmitter powers are constrained and controlled by a distributed constrained power control (DCPC) algorithm. Due to transmitter mobility and random signal propagation, there are system states where not all transmitters can be supported, even under the optimal power control. Thus, some of them should be removed. It can be shown that finding the optimal removal set is an NP-complete problem, and therefore gives rise to heuristic algorithms. In this paper we study and compare among three classes of transmitter removal algorithms, one-by-one removals, multiple removals and power control with removals combined. All removal algorithms are compared with respect to their outage probabilities and their time to convergence to a steady state. The power control with removals combined algorithm emerges as the best approach with respect to both criteria.

  • 8.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Gradual Removals in Cellular PCS with Constrained Power Control and Noise1996In: Wireless networks, ISSN 1022-0038, E-ISSN 1572-8196, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study the mobile removal problem in a cellular PCS network where  transmitter powers are constrained and controlled by a Distributed Constrained  Power Control (DCPC) algorithm. Receivers are subject to non­negligible noise,  and the DCPC attempts to bring each receiver's CIR above a given target. To  evaluate feasibility and computational complexity, we assume a paradigm where  radio bandwidth is scarce and inter­base station connection is fast.  We show that finding the optimal removal set is an NP-Complete problem,  giving rise for heuristic algorithms. We study and compare among three classes  of transmitter removal algorithms. Two classes consist of algorithms which are  invoked only when reaching a stable power vector under DCPC. The third class  consist of algorithms which combine transmitter removals with power control.  These are One-by-one Removals, Multiple Removals, and Power Control with Removals Combined. In the class of power control with removals combined, we also  consider a distributed algorithm which uses the same local information as DCPC  does.

    All removal algorithms are compared with respect to their outage probabilities  and their time to converge to a stable state. Comparisons are made in a hexagonal macro-cellular system, and in two metropolitan micro-cellular systems. The  Power Control with Removals Combined algorithm emerges as practically the best  approach with respect to both criteria.

  • 9.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Rosberg, Zvi
    IBM, Haifa Research Laboratory.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Soft Admission in Cellular PCS with Constrained Power Control and Noise1995In: Proc 5th WINLAB Workshop on Third Generation Wireless Information Networks, 1995, p. 287-320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the mobile admission control problem in a cellular PCS network where trans- mitter powers are constrained and controlled by a Distributed Constrained Power Control (DCPC) algorithm. Receivers are subject to non-negligible noise, and the DCPC attempts to bring each receiver's CIR (Carrier to Interference Ratio) above a given quality target. Two classes of distributed admission controls are considered. One is a Non-Interactive Admission Control (N-IAC), where an admission decision is instantaneously made based on the system state. The other is an Interactive Admission Control (IAC), under which the new mobile is permitted to interact with one or more potential channels before a decision is made. The algorithms are evaluated with respect to their execution time, and their decision errors. Two types of errors are examined. Type I error, where a new mobile is erroneously accepted and results an outage; and type II error, where a new mobile is erroneously rejected and results in blocking. The algorithms in the N-IAC class accept a new mobile, if and only if the uplink and the downlink interferences are below certain corresponding thresholds. These algorithms are subject to errors of type I and type II. In the IAC class, we derive a Soft and Safe (SAS) admission algorithm, which is type I and type II error free, and protects the CIRs of all active links at any moment of time. A Fast-SAS version which is only type I error free, is proposed for practical implementation, and evaluated in several case studies.

  • 10.
    Andersin, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Roseberg, Zvi
    Soft and safe admission control in cellular networks1997In: IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, ISSN 1063-6692, E-ISSN 1558-2566, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the mobile admission control problem in a cellular PCS network where transmitter powers are constrained and controlled by a distributed constrained power control (DCPC) algorithm. Receivers are subject to nonnegligible noise, and the DCPC attempts to bring each receiver's CIR (carrier-to-interference ratio) above a given quality target. Two classes of distributed admission control are considered. One is a noninteractive admission control (N-IAC), where an admission decision is instantaneously made based on the system state. The other is an interactive admission control (IAC), under which the new mobile is permitted to interact with one or more potential channels before a decision is made. The algorithms are evaluated with respect to their execution time and their decision errors. Two types of errors are examined: type I error, where a new mobile is erroneously accepted and results in outage; and type II error, where a new mobile is erroneously rejected and results in blocking. The algorithms in the N-IAC class accept a new mobile if and only if the uplink and the downlink interferences are below certain corresponding thresholds. These algorithms are subject to errors of type I and type II. In the IAC class, we derive a soft and safe (SAS) admission algorithm, which is type I and type II error free, and protects the CIR's of all active links at any moment of time. A fast-SAS version, which is only type I error-free, is proposed for practical implementation, and is evaluated in several case studies.

1 - 10 of 10
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  • apa
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  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • en-GB
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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