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  • 1. Bonanni, L.
    et al.
    Ebner, Hannes
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Hockenberry, M.
    Sayan, B.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Csikszentmihàlyi, N.
    Ishii, H.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Young, S.
    Zapico Lamela, Jorge Luis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Sourcemap.org: First Application of Linked and Open LCA Data to Support Sustainability2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bäck, Asta
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Reti, Tommo
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Saarela, Janne
    Sarvas, Risto
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Vainikainen, Sari
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Rich Semantic Media for Private and Professional Users2005Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the current state and future development potential oftechnologies that are relevant in developing new media products and servicesbased on content that is described with semantically rich metadata. It has beenwritten within the project "Rich semantic media for private and professionalusers". The project addresses two important trends and opportunities: utilisingsemantics in media products and combining commercial media content withuser created material.The report starts with a presentation of the framework for the project anddescribes three key demonstration ideas. The demonstrations explorecombining professional and private content and how this process benefitsfrom semantic support. The main focus of the project and this report is onsemantically supported media applications but the report briefly looks at theSemantic Web status in general and what kind of semantically supportedapplications there are already currently available.The big challenge in creating semantically supported media applications iscreating the necessary infrastructure, i.e. ontologies and content withmetadata. A formal language is needed for specifying the ontology, and therethe recently approved the Web Ontology Language (OWL) is an importantstep. However, there are still only few practical applications, so it is stillunclear how well this language can meet the requirements. Query language isanother important component, and there, SPARQL Query Language for RDF,is currently being defined.Creating metadata is very laborious, if made manually. Therefore, differentway of creating metadata must be utilised: metadata may be captured as a byproduct during the production and consumption processes, it may be createdexplicitly, or may be inferenced based on the content itself. Metadata creationis not in the focus of the project, but the main principles are briefly explained.Several existing media related vocabularies are presented in the report as wellas some publicly available ontologies. There is lack of publicly availablevocabularies and ontologies, and those that exist, such as IPTC, are oftenutilised only to limited extent. The report also lists several project that dealwith related issues.

  • 3.
    Bäck, Asta
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Vainikainen, Sari
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Näkki, Pirjo
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Reti, Tommo
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Sarvas, Risto
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Seppälä, Lassi
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Hietanen, Herkko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Semantically supported media services with user participation: Report on the RISE-project2006Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This publication presents the main results of the project "Rich Semantic Media for Private and Professional Users" (RISE). The background to the launch of the project was the identification of two important developments: the emergence of user-generated content and Semantic Web technologies. The goal was to study what kind of new opportunities semantic metadata and combining commercial media content with user-created material give to media companies and their suppliers for product and service development. The publication gives an overview on recent developments relating to utilising user-generated content and metadata in public Web applications, and an update on development on Semantic Web technologies related issues on their relevance to the application development made in the project. The project chose to explore research issues by building prototypes. Each of the prototypes is presented including a user scenario, implementation, results, discussion and future work. The StorySlotMachine is travelling related application, which allows users to make their own guidebooks to be used during the trip. After the trip users can make presentations combining their own photos and commercial content. Ontologies are used for automatic aggregation and to offer content that deals with the topic. The Remix Engine prototype is a Web-based video editing and compilation application that lets the user combine his or her own media with commercialmedia with the help of pre-made templates. The end product, a video, is composed of professional material that includes team logos, TV brands, advertisements, and so on. DiMaS is a Digital Content Distribution Management System for multimedia producers to publish their work on P2P file sharing networks. The system enables producers to insert content metadata, to manage intellectual property and usage rights, and to charge for the consumption. Applications like StorySlotMachine and RemixEngine could be built in connection to media archives, like news archives, or in connection to encyclopaedia, where the material is already modular. If and when users do the final aggregating and editing work themselves, the costs for offering content this way are not high after the initial investment in the tools and metadata have been made. Commercial media must be able to offer more value to the users than free services and utilising ontologies in makingservices more intelligent is one opportunity. There are still challenges for building this kind of services: A big issue in utilising semantic metadata and Semantic Web technologies is developing and maintaining ontologies. Another issue is adding semantic metadata to the content. Also legal issues like commercialisation of the content creation activity, intellectual property rights within the creators, the brand image of the content or the group, and managing the liability risks in content production need to be solved. If mediacompanies turn their content into more modular format and add semantic metadata to support reusability and active exploration of content they have more opportunities to create new consumer applications with rich user experience.

  • 4.
    Elevant, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Improving Weather and Climatic Information Quality with User-generated Observations2011In: 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS-44 2010, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we suggest that active participation by civil society may arise through sharing of environmental data – observations of weather and other measurable variables in the environment, performed by individuals. A general model illustrating individual time resources is introduced, in order to map the two studied groups, i.e. school children and adults interested in weather due to their daily dependence on traffic conditions, and to further generalize the results to other groups in the society, regarding the potential role of the individual to produce valuable information beneficial to the society.

  • 5.
    Herrera, Fernando
    et al.
    Dept. of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada, Spain.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology.
    Games and Community-Based Innovation2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hietanen, Herkko
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology , Cambridge, MA, USA.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Berkeley, CA, USA .
    The Changing Dynamics of Television Advertising2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advertising on the online video platforms has yet to meet the expectations that advertiser and platforms have placed on it. However, the growing trend of using the Internet to access video offers advertisers the opportunity to target viewers more accurately than broadcast television ever has.

    The complicated commercial television broadcast dynamics are evolving to facilitate online distribution. Many actors in the broadcast value network are adjusting their value propositions and new nodes are emerging to pair viewers with programs, and advertisers with relevant viewers. These changes are occurring because the Internet as an interactive distribution channel does not recognize television channels, schedules or regional broadcasting areas.

    The changes will affect the way television networks and other video platforms sell advertisement spaces. Audience measuring changes and advertisers start dynamically serving advertisements unlike in the past when networks did the placement. The platform owners will evolve from sellers of static and predefined advertising inventory to providers of dynamic advertisement opportunities to targeted segments.

  • 7.
    Ijsselsteijn, Wijnand
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    van den Hoogen, Wouter
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Klimmt, Christoph
    Hochschule für Musik und Theater, Hannover, Germany.
    de Kort, Yvonne
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Lindley, Craig
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlshamn, Sweden.
    Mathiak, Klaus
    RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Poels, Karolien
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    CKIR, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Vorderer, Peter
    CAMeRA, Free University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Measuring the Experience of Digital Game Enjoyment2008In: Proceedings of Measuring Behavior 2008 (Maastricht, The Netherlands, August 26-29, 2008), 2008, p. 88-89Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Jokela, S
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Kurki, T
    Savia, E
    Sulonen, R
    The Role of Structured Content in a Personalized News Service2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization of content and exponential growth of the Internet and electronic commerce are changing the media industry. The availability of structured content enables new ways to produce and deliver information. The paper explains the role of semantic metadata in developing content for an adaptive news service in the SmartPush-project. In SmartPush, news content is categorized using semi-automatic tools and pre-defined vocabularies. Metadata enhanced content is then matched against user profiles to provide customers with a personalized news service. After providing the personalized news to the customer, the SmartPush system adapts the personalization based on user feedback. The paper discusses the requirements of personalized content services and challenges in an approach based on structured metadata. We describe how supporting ontologies for the content were developed and maintained and what kinds of tools were developed to support the structured metadata creation. We also present some results of the pilot phase of the project and introduce some of the issues observed during the system implementation and in the performed field trial.

  • 9. Jokela, S
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Sulonen, R
    Ontology Development for Flexible Content2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Converging media industry calls for tighter integration of creativity, business processes, and technologies. Media companies need flexible methods to manage electronic content production and delivery, and metadata is a key enabler in making this goal a reality. However, metadata is useful only if its nature is understood clearly and its structure and usage are well-defined. For this purpose, ontology, consisting of conceptual models that map the content domain into a limited set of meaningful concepts, is needed. This paper introduces an ontology development framework rooted at the core business processes of electronic publishing that can be used to define semantic metadata structures for electronic content. The framework underlines the different nature of ontology development and metadata publishing, and how these two processes influence each other. This paper discusses also the application of the ontology development framework in practice. The framework has been created in the SmartPush project, where media companies explore new business opportunities for electronic publishing and delivery.

  • 10.
    Kuikkaniemi, Kai
    et al.
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hoggan, Eve
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Müller, Jörg
    Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Berlin, Germany.
    From Space to Stage: How Interactive Screens Will Change Urban Life2011In: Computer, ISSN 0018-9162, E-ISSN 1558-0814, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 40-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Framed digital displays will soon give way to walls and facades that creatively motivate individual and group interaction. A stage serves as an apt metaphor to explore the ways in which these ubiquitous screens can transform passive viewing into an involved performance.

  • 11.
    Kuikkaniemi, Kai
    et al.
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Toni
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Saari, Timo
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Kosunen, Ilkka
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    The Influence of Implicit and Explicit Biofeedback in First-Person Shooter Games2010In: CHI2010: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 28TH ANNUAL CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, VOLS 1-4, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2010, p. 859-868Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand how implicit and explicit biofeedback work in games, we developed a first-person shooter (FPS) game to experiment with different biofeedback techniques. While this area has seen plenty of discussion, there is little rigorous experimentation addressing how biofeedback can enhance human computer interaction. In our two-part study, (N=36) subjects first played eight different game stages with two implicit biofeedback conditions, with two simulation-based comparison and repetition rounds, then repeated the two biofeedback stages when given explicit information on the biofeedback. The biofeedback conditions were respiration and skin-conductance (EDA) adaptations. Adaptation targets were four balanced player avatar attributes. We collected data with psychophysiological measures (electromyography, respiration, and EDA), a game experience questionnaire, and game-play measures. According to our experiment, implicit biofeedback does not produce significant effects in player experience in an FPS game. In the explicit biofeedback conditions, players were more immersed and positively affected, and they were able to manipulate the game play with the biosignal interface. We recommend exploring the possibilities of using explicit biofeedback interaction in commercial games.

  • 12.
    Kuikkaniemi, Kai
    et al.
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Salovaara, Antti
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland.
    Saari, Timo
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Vuorenmaa, Janne
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Toolkit for user-created augmented reality games2006In: MUM '06 Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Mobile and ubiquitous multimedia, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present MAR (Mobile Augmented Reality) Toolkit as an easy-to-use augmented reality toolset for building multi-user mobile phone games. It is built on top of MUPE - Nokia-developed open source mobile platform based on Java - which considers the special qualities of mobile technology. MAR Toolkit contains four components, map interface (MAP), physical object tagger (POT), public display (PUD) and silent communicator (SIC).We have successfully demonstrated MAR Toolkit by implementing a game named as Mupeland Yard based on classical board game Scotland Yard. In user testing we found that common usability issues related to mobile technology and MUPE-platform troubled the tests. However, especially POT component raised interest among developers. We found that using graphical 2D-tags for providing location information for augmented reality games is a simple and robust alternative for more technology intensive GPS and cell-ID information.

  • 13. Kuittinen, M
    et al.
    Sutinen, E
    Topi, H
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Learning by Experience: Networks in Learning Organizations2001In: Informatica, ISSN 0350-5596, E-ISSN 1854-3871, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 159-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    offers undergraduate courses in Cognitive Science. The studies are mainly organized as web-based courses or collaborative student projects. In the basic studies component, a student completes four one credit methodology courses and chooses a related assignment worth three credits for one of them. One of the methodology courses is entitled Networks in Learning Organization. It will be delivered entirely on the web, and it also will serve as a pilot course to help design other methodology courses. This paper will first briefly discuss the theoretical foundations of learning organizations and organizational learning. Then, we will review the role of networks as the technological foundation of a learning organization and continue by discussing the use of educational technology to support organizational learning and learn about it. Finally, we will describe the structure and the methods of the course and present topics that form the starting point for the discourse within the course.

  • 14. Kurki, T
    et al.
    Jokela, S
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Sulonen, R
    Agents in Delivering Personalized Content Based on Semantic Metadata1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the SmartPush project professional editors add semantic metadata to information flow when the content is created. This metadata is used to filter the information flow to provide the end users with a personalized news service. Personalization and delivery process is modeled as software agents, to whom the user delegates the task of sifting through incoming information. The key components of the SmartPush architecture have been implemented, and the focus in the project is shifting towards a pilot implementation and testing the ideas in practice.

  • 15. Ravaja, Niklas
    et al.
    Saari, Timo
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Laarni, Jari
    Salminen, Mikko
    Kivikangas, Matias
    Spatial presence and emotions during video game playing: Does it matter with whom you play?2006In: Presence - Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, ISSN 1054-7460, E-ISSN 1531-3263, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 381-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined whether the nature of the opponent ( computer, friend, or stranger) influences spatial presence, emotional responses, and threat and challenge appraisals when playing video games. In a within- subjects design, participants played two different video games against a computer, a friend, and a stranger. In addition to self- report ratings, cardiac interbeat intervals ( IBIs) and facial electromyography ( EMG) were measured to index physiological arousal and emotional valence. When compared to playing against a computer, playing against another human elicited higher spatial presence, engagement, anticipated threat, post- game challenge appraisals, and physiological arousal, as well as more positively valenced emotional responses. In addition, playing against a friend elicited greater spatial presence, engagement, and self- reported and physiological arousal, as well as more positively valenced facial EMG responses, compared to playing against a stranger. The nature of the opponent influences spatial presence when playing video games, possibly through the mediating influence on arousal and attentional processes.

  • 16.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    et al.
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Saari, Timo
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Puttonen, S.
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    The psychophysiology of James Bond: Phasic emotional responses to violent video game events2008In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined emotional valence- and arousal-related phasic psychophysiological responses to different violent events in the first-person shooter video game "James Bond 007: NightFire" among 36 young adults. Event-related changes in zygomaticus major, corrugator supercilii, and orbicularis oculi electromyographic (EMG) activity and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded, and the participants rated their emotions and the trait psychoticism based on the Psychoticism dimension of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised, Short Form. Wounding and killing the opponent elicited an increase in SCL and a decrease in zygomatic and orbicularis oculi EMG activity. The decrease in zygomatic and orbicularis oculi activity was less pronounced among high Psychoticism scorers compared with low Psychoticism scorers. The wounding and death of the player's own character (James Bond) elicited an increase in SCL and zygomatic and orbicularis oculi EMG activity and a decrease in corrugator activity. Instead of joy resulting from victory and success, wounding and killing the opponent may elicit high-arousal negative affect (anxiety), with high Psychoticism scorers experiencing less anxiety than low Psychoticism scorers. Although counterintuitive, the wounding and death of the player's own character may increase some aspect of positive emotion.

  • 17. Rosenqvist, C
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Saari, T
    Development of online services under time critical conditions2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has dramatically increased the possibilities for media product development. This is becoming a key factor for media companies specialized in managing and distributing information, as high demand for online services has pushed media companies to release their products faster. This study explores an iterative model for development of web products, and compares this model to conventional media products and software industry. Two Finnish news sites were analyzed from the perspectives of their content, structure, and working routines. Then, a new online service was designed and evaluated by four internal test groups. The study shows that creating value added web sites for high performance is a complex operation; it requires technical software tools and co-operation between people with different skills and background. Working with digital online products offers the development team several benefits e.g. inexpensive prototyping and multiple iteration loops.

  • 18. Räsänen, Pekka
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Trends in the Internet and media use in the early 2000s.2009In: Proceedings of the WebSci'09: Society On-Line, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The academic researchers and policy-makers alike share the view that the citizens’ media reading skills are very important for the future social welfare in the advanced societies. Particularly the new information and communication technologies (ICTs) are seen as tools for the advancement of work of the private sector companies and public sector organizations. Various governance activities, for example, can be integrated with the help of on-line transactions between citizens and authorities. However, the proliferation of ICTs and differences in the media use patterns seem also to connect with the existing social inequalities. It is known, for instance, that the poor and less-educated individuals tend to read less books and newspapers than others. These social groups also use the Internet clearly more infrequently that most other groups. The paper examines the use of the Internet and conventional media from the perspective of European welfare societies. It is asked to what extent European countries show similar and different patterns of use with each other. In particular, the interest is to estimate these similarities and differences at the population level. It is also evaluated whether certain countries are more homogeneous with each other as some others. In theoretical sense, we ask whether it is possible or not to categorize countries by using certain classification criteria such as regional proximity or a welfare state typology. The data consists of the European Social Survey data (ESS) from 2002, 2004 and 2006. ESS data were collected by face-to-face interviews in 30 European countries. The data represent the residential populations of these countries aged 15 and older. The total number of cases ranges from approximately fifteen hundred to two thousand cases from each country per year. In the analysis, the dependent measures consist of the frequencies of television watching newspaper reading, and the use of the Internet. Our special focus is in the average time devoted on news; politics and current affairs. Along with the country of residence, age, gender, education, and income are used as the independent measures. It is concluded in the paper that there are certain recognisable cultural characteristics attached to both the Internet use and conventional media consumption in different parts of Europe. Results indicate that there are considerable disparities between population groups when these patterns are examined in statistical models. Particularly the existence of the differences by age groups is important in the light of prevailing demographic structures. On the basis of the findings, it is argued that political assumptions, according to which the contemporary structural inequalities can be smoothed when more extensive ICT infrastructures will be provided for consumers, are just too simplistic.

  • 19. Saarela, J
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Korkea-aho, M
    Puskala, T
    Sulonen, R
    Logical Structure of a Hypermedia Newspaper1997In: Information Processing & Management, ISSN 0306-4573, E-ISSN 1873-5371, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 599-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The OtaOnline project at the Helsinki University of Technology has been deploying the distribution of Finnish newspapers such as Iltalehti, Aamulehti and Kauppalehti on the Internet since 1994, The editors produce the electronic counterpart of these papers by a conversion process from QuarkXpress documents to HyperText Markup Language. The project is about to step into a new phase by introducing an approach which provides many new features not available in the old process. This paper describes an object-oriented approach which implements the logical model of a hypermedia newspaper. This model encapsulates the structure of the hypermedia documents as well as their capability for transforming into different presentation formats. It also provides a semantical rating mechanism to be used with intelligent agents. A distribution scheme which enables efficient use of this model is also presented

  • 20. Saarela, J
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Sulonen, R
    Requirements for an Electronic Newspaper1996Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The OtaOnline project at the Helsinki University of Technology has been deploying the distribution of ordinary newspapers on the Internet since 1994. So far the electronic counterpart has been produced through a series of conversions. Now a more controlled approach needs to be defined in order to bring added value to the electronic version. This paper describes requirements for a system implementing a product concept of an electronic newspaper which allows for more flexible generation, distribution and processing of the documents. We aim at multi-purpose publishing by supporting several presentation environments and distribution channels. Personalisation aspects are also discussed from the contents point of view. Concrete suggestions for implementing the features are given and implications of this approach are also presented. 1 Introduction The OtaOnline-project is a testbed at the Helsinki University of Technology campus. It has provided the students and staff with an electronic

  • 21. Saari, T
    et al.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Psychological Customization of Information - Basic Concepts2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kallinen, Kari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Towards emotionally adapted games2004In: Proceedings of Presence 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a framework for a gaming personalization system to systematically facilitate desired emotional states of individual players of games. Psychological Customization entails personalization of the way of presenting information (user interface, visual layouts, modalities, narrative structures and other factors) per user or user group to create desired transient psychological effects and states, such as emotion, attention, involvement, presence, persuasion and learning. By varying the form of information presented in a game in an emotionally intelligent way it may be possible to achieve such effects. Theory, key concepts, available empiric evidence and an example of an application area in emotional gaming as well as a basic system design are presented.

  • 23.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Emotional Regulation System for Emotionally Adapted Games2005In: Proceedings of FuturePlay 2005 conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Group-Centered Personalization Technologies for Facilitating Organizational Learning2005In: Proceedings of HCI International 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Persuasive games and simulations for personal health management2005In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Towards emotionally adapted games based on user controlled emotional knobs2005In: Proceedings of Digra gaming conference, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents an approach to a gaming personalization system to systematically facilitate or avoid user-selected emotions during gameplay with control knobs that regulate the emotional impact of the game. Underlying the framework is a Psychological Customization system that entails personalization of the way of presenting information (user interface, visual layouts, modalities, narrative and temporal structures and other factors) per user or user group to create desired transient psychological effects and states (such as emotion, attention, involvement, presence, persuasion and learning).

  • 27.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    User Controlled Emotional Regulation System for Games Based on Form Factor Adaptations2005In: Proceedings of HCII 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Facilitating Learning from News with Mind-Based Technologies2004In: ED-MEDIA 2004: World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Vols. 1-7 / [ed] Cantoni, L; McLoughlin, C, 2004, p. 4277-4284Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information, such as news, presented to individual users may be customized on the basis of the immediate emotional and cognitive types of psychological effects it is likely to enable or create. Both content and its way of presentation (modality, visual layouts, ways of interaction, structure) may be varied. Despite obvious complexities empirical evidence suggests that the way of presenting information to certain psychological profiles has predictable psychological effects. For instance, one may facilitate positive emotion for users with certain personality type or more efficient learning for certain cognitive styles. This is the concept of Mind-Based Technologies. Psychological Customization is a technique of implementation of Mind-Based Technologies. This paper describes the basics of Psychological Customization and discusses the personalization of the form of news as one possible application area to enhance learning from news in everyday use of the media.

  • 29.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Psychological Customization of Information. Applications for Personalizing the Form of News2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Towards Psychological Customization of Information for Individuals and Social Groups2004In: Designing Personalization of User Experiences for eCommerce / [ed] Clare-Marie Karat, Jan O. Blom, John Karat, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Kuikkaniemi, Kai
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kosunen, Ilkka
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    CKIR, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Emotional Adaptation Space for Games: An Example of a Psychophysiologically Adapted First-Person Shooter Game2009In: Proceedings of HCI International 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    User Experience Based Adaptation of Information in Mobile Contexts for Mobile Messaging2005In: Foundations of Augmented Cognition, Vol 11, 2005, p. 918-927Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe and elaborate an approach to a context sensitive personalization system to systematically facilitate desired user experiences, such as emotional and attentional states and information processing of individual users and groups of users in various contexts. Psychological Customization entails personalization of the way of presenting information (user interface, visual layouts, modalities, structures) per user or user group to create desired transient psychological effects and states, such as emotion, attention, involvement, presence, persuasion and learning. By varying the form of information presented in a mobile device in a contextually intelligent way may be possible to achieve such effects. Theory, conceptual implications, available empirical evidence and an example of an application area in mobile messaging are presented.

  • 33.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Kallinen, Kari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Psychologically intelligent mobile multimedia messaging systems2004In: Proceedings of SID 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Kallinen, Kari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Psychologically targeted persuasive advertising and product information presentation in eCommerce2004In: Proceedings of ICEC 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe a framework for a personalization system to systematically induce desired emotion and attention related states and promote information processing in viewers of online advertising and e-commerce product information. Psychological Customization entails personalization of the way of presenting information (user interface, visual layouts, modalities, structures) per user to create desired transient psychological effects and states, such as emotion, attention, involvement, presence, persuasion and learning. Conceptual foundations and empiric evidence for the approach are presented

  • 35.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    CKIR, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Emotionally Adapted Games – An Example of a First-Person Shooter2009In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, PT IV, 2009, p. 406-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a specific customization technology Psychological Customization - which enables the customization of information presented on a computer-based system in real-time and its application to manipulating emotions when playing computer games. The possibilities of customizing different elements of games to manipulate emotions are presented and a definition of emotionally adaptive games is given. A psychophysiologically adaptive game is discussed as an example of emotionally adapted games.

  • 36.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Technological and Psychological Fundamentals of Psychological Customization Systems – An Example of Emotionally Adapted Games2010In: Mass Customization for Personalized Communication Environments: Integrating Human Factors / [ed] Mourlas, C. and Germanakos, P., IGI Global, 2010, p. 182-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Saari, Timo
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology.
    Ravaja, Niklas
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
    Laarni, Jari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kallinen, Kari
    Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Emotionally loaded mobile multimedia messaging2004In: ENTERTAINMENT COMPUTING - ICEC 2004 / [ed] Rauterberg, M, 2004, p. 476-486Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile messaging is an increasingly important way of social interaction as people use their mobile phones for communicating with each other with textual and multimedia messages. Often with these messaging systems people have the need to communicate their own emotions or facilitate a given emotion in the receiver of their message. This paper will describe an information personalization system that may facilitate emotional communication especially in mobile multimedia messaging systems, thereby making the communication “emotionally loaded”.

  • 38.
    Salovaara, Antti
    et al.
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland.
    Johnson, Mikael
    SoberIT, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Toiskallio, Kalle
    SoberIT, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Tiitta, Sauli
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Nurturers: A creative player segment and their motivations in multi-player games2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Salovaara, Antti
    et al.
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland.
    Johnson, Mikael
    SoberIT, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Toiskallio, Kalle
    SoberIT, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Tiitta, Sauli
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Playmakers in Multiplayer Game Communities: Their Importance and Motivations for Participation2005In: 2005 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, ACE '05, 2005, p. 334-337Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many game-like open-ended multiplayer communities, the success of the game, and well-being of the community, depends on the efforts of certain individuals who arrange resources for gameplay to other players. These include e.g. game masters, server hosts, and fan site creators. We identify the importance of these voluntary "playmakers " by describing their activities in four communities: (1) Habbo Hotel moderators, creative room designers and fan site builders, (2) Live-action role-playing game masters and non-player characters, (3) Geocaching cache creators, and (4) Neverwinter Nights dungeon masters, player guides, developers, and server hosts. Based on an analysis of this empirical data we describe motivations that the playmakers have for participation in game community activities. Such descriptions will help to improve design for games where playmaker involvement is of critical importance to the game's success.

  • 40.
    Sarvas, Risto
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Mäntylä, Martti
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Human-centric design of future print media2007In: PulPaper 2007 Conference:: Innovative and Sustainable use of Forest Resources, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we argue that the plain old “dumb ” paper is overlooked as a platform for media. In addition to technology-centric innovations, such as smart paper, the pulp and paper industry should adapt a human-centric approach as well. By using our research on photo books as an example, we bring forth the qualities of paper media from a user-centric perspective. This perspective is critical in understanding the changing media business. For the pulp and paper industry, understanding the end-uses of paper from the users ’ perspective means new opportunities for business, partnerships, products, and services. However, the situation calls for an active role: paper will remain an undervalued technology platform without an intervention from the industry.

  • 41.
    Sarvas, Risto
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Jokela, Sami
    Helsinki Univ. of Technol., Espoo, Finland.
    New Business in Computer-Mediated Communities2004Report (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Sarvas, Risto
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Virtanen, Perttu
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Hietanen, Herkko
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Herrera, Fernando
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Legal and Organizational Issues in Collaborative User-Created Content2005In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views – Worlds in Play, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we look at issues that arise when people collaboratively create digital content and want to publicly distribute it. Our focus is on the organizational and legal problems. We identify and analyze these issues based on four case studies on amateur content production. Two of the cases, Habbo Hotel and Neverwinter Nights, are about fan/gamer-created content production based on material licensed by companies. In the two latter cases, a micromovie community Blauereiter and a web publication The Melrose Mirror, the content produced is not based on licensed material, but on the creations of the community members themselves. Based on the case studies, we identify that the main legal issues and concerns in collaborative creation of content are decision-making and liability. We argue that the content creation communities would often benefit in organizing themselves formally as entities such as corporations or cooperatives, or on a contractual basis.

  • 43. Smith, B. K.
    et al.
    Bender, W.
    Endter, I.
    Driscoll, J.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    Quan, D.
    Sliver Stringers and Junior Journalists: Active information producers2000In: IBM Systems Journal, ISSN 0018-8670, Vol. 39, no 04-mar, p. 730-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two projects, Silver Stringers and Junior Journalists, are examples of a shift in the role of the news consumer - community members are actively engaged in publishing pursuits previously confined to the traditional media. Their activities range from news gathering and dissemination to asking questions and debating issues of importance, whether local, international, or topical in scope. This paper describes the evolution of these projects, the experiences of the participants, the technologies developed and employed, and the epistemological impact.

  • 44. Turpeinen, Marko
    Augmenting Financial News for Individuals and Organizations2002In: International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, ISSN 1560-4624, E-ISSN 1741-5055, Vol. 12, no 1-4, p. 277-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    News can be made more relevant to readers by customising its content. Information Augmentation (IA) combines continuous information streams, like a financial news service, with selected data from heterogeneous information sources. These can be internal databases of any user community, or external resources like encyclopaedia and web search engines. Professional editors add semantic metadata to information flow when the content has been created. Data resources for augmentation are modelled with descriptive metadata and monitored by information mediators. Rich and dynamically changing user and community models are gathered. These models consist of the special interests, expertise level, previous activity, and community context, of any individual user. The personalisation and augmentation process is implemented with an agent-based architecture, which consists of profiling, mediation, and augmentation agents. The profiling agent monitors individual users and user communities. The mediator agent connects various types of data resources and combines data into a XML based format used in augmentation. Augmentation agents receive necessary information from the mediator agent, and present the news context for the reader. The augmentation tools that have been built for the domain of financial news include (1) historical news context; (2) an explanation of financial terms; (3) number comparison; (4) company tracking; and (5) news map.

  • 45. Turpeinen, Marko
    Co-evolution of broadcast, Customized and Community-Created Media2003In: New Articulations of the Public Service Remit, Nordicom, 2003Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46. Turpeinen, Marko
    News and Learning in Network Environments1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology ,Finland.
    Kuikkaniemi, Kai
    Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mobile content communities2007Report (Refereed)
  • 48. Turpeinen, Marko
    et al.
    Saarela, J
    Korkea-aho, M
    Puskala, T
    Sulonen, R
    Architecture for Agent-mediated Personalised News Services1996Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging agent technology can be used to implement a personalised news service. The consumer agent has a model of user's preferences and is able to request information that fulfills these needs. The producer agent has a logical model of the contents of the multimedia objects that are available for service. On the basis of this model, the producer agent can advertise its services in the network to potential consumer agents. The selected multimedia items are offered to the consumer as a personalised newspaper. This architecture is used in practise in building a personalised newspaper for the World Wide Web, which selects and presents the user with articles that match user's preferences. The article selection process is a combination of keyword searches, semantic matching and social filtering. In our agent-based service, the newspaper editors have an important role in defining semantic categories for the contents of the service, and in providing necessary metadata about the news articles....

  • 49.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technolygy, Finland.
    Saari, Timo
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technolygy, Finland.
    System Architecture for Psychological Customization of Communication Technology2004In: Proceedings of HICSS-37 Minitrack on Personalization Management Systems, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalization is a process that changes the functionality, interface, information content, or appearance of a system to increase its personal relevance to an individual. Personalization systems accommodate individual's needs and interests explicitly through changes and selections initiated by the user, and implicitly through automatic adaptation techniques. Currently most of the emphasis in personalization systems is geared towards the utilitarian aspects of personalized information delivery. However, what is lacking is the customization of information based on its likely emotional and cognitive effects on different users of communication technology. Information presented to individual users or a group of users may be customized on the basis of the immediate emotional and cognitive types of psychological effects it is likely to enable or create in certain individuals or groups. Both content and its way of presentation (modality, visual layouts, ways of interaction, structure) may be varied. Despite obvious complexities empirical evidence suggests that the way of presenting information to certain psychological profiles has predictable psychological effects. For instance, one may facilitate positive emotion for users with certain personality type or more efficient learning for certain cognitive styles. This is the basic concept of mind-based technologies. Psychological customization may be considered an operationalization and technique of implementing the concept of mind-based technologies in system design. Psychological customization may be used for controlling social interaction-centric and individual-centric influence of the content and way of presentation of information on consequent and transient emotional and cognitive effects. This paper explores the design space and presents a basic system architecture to implement psychological customization.

  • 50.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    et al.
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology, Finland.
    Sarvas, Risto
    Helsinki Inst for Information Technology.
    Herrera, Fernando
    Dept. of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada, Spain.
    It’s a phone not a console!2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    You've all heard it before - mobile gaming will be huge because everybody has a mobile phone. However, how canmass-market mobile phones ever compete with handheld game decks such as the Sony PSP and NintendoGameboy? These companies have industry know-how, strong gaming brands and large market shares, goodmarketing engines, interfaces optimized for gaming, better graphics, no device compatibility issues, and businessmodels without major regional differences and several operators to deal with.Perhaps they should not compete at all. Mobile phone game developers should take advantage of the specialcharacteristics of the device in developing, marketing and distributing new types of games. These characteristics arerelated to the social nature of the device, e.g. it has an address book that contains your acquaintances and acts as amediator of messages, it is a portable and shareable picture album, and you can even use it for talking. Thiscombined with the openness of the platforms makes it customizable and moddable in ways not possible withhandheld game decks. Also, the network connectiveness of phones combined with extensive coverage of phonenetworks simply cannot be found in any other portable computer. How can these features be leveraged in creatingnew forms of mobile entertainment?Drawing from related phenomena including PC game modding, mobile imaging, Geocaching, Habbo Hotel, andLive-Action Role Play (LARP), we offer fresh perspectives and ideas to professional game developers by presentingresearch findings in mobile gaming and mobile gaming communities. For example, the cross-media and crossplatformnature of LARP, Geocaching, and Habbo Hotel indicates that the combination of mobile phones and gameshas the potential to be richer and more immersive experiences. On the other hand, examples like PC modding,mobile photo competitions, as well as LARP and Geocaching, show that with appropriate tools users will come upwith innovative game content and even novel game concepts. Thirdly, because the phone is a personal devicethrough which the owner can be identified (i.e., phone number), it has key benefits in billing models, personalization,and trust (e.g., buying virtual furniture in Habbo Hotel).

12 1 - 50 of 57
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