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  • 1.
    Aullón Alcaine, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sandhi, Arifin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Schulz, C.
    Mörth, C. M.
    Distribution and mobility of geogenic arsenic in the shallow aquifers of the northeast of La Pampa, Argentina2012In: Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2012, p. 132-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater contamination with elevated Arsenic (As) and other toxic trace elements has been studied in the central part of the vast Chaco-Pampean Plain, in the city of Quemú Quemú, northeastern La Pampa, Argentina. The groundwater samples were mostly alkaline with pH ranging up to 9.18, oxidizing and characterized by high EC. The concentration of total As (5.58-535 μg/L) and fluoride (0.5-14.2 mg/L) in some samples exceeded the recommended WHO drinking water guideline and the Argentine national drinking water standard. Arsenic was positively correlated with bicarbonate (HCO 3 -), Boron (B), Fluoride (F) and Vanadium (V). Long-term consumption of the groundwater could pose a severe health threat for the local community.

  • 2.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mukherjee, Arun B.
    Helsinki University Environmental Research Centre, Finland.
    Zeevenhoven, Ron
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland .
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Loeppert, Richard H.
    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX, USA.
    Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment: Biogeochemical Interactions, Health Effects and Remediation2007Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume presents the recent developments in the field of arsenic in soil and groundwater. Arranged into nine sections, the text emphasizes the global occurrences of arsenic in the environment, particularly on its source, pathways, behavior, and effects it has on soils, plants, water, animals, and humans. It also covers the diverse issues of arsenic in the mining environment, arsenic emanating from hydrothermal springs, and the geochemical modeling of arsenic adsorption to oxide surfaces. Finally, the text includes different cost effective removal mechanisms of arsenic from drinking water using natural red earth, solar oxidation, and arsenic oxidation by ferrrate.

  • 3.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ramanathan, Alagappan
    School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067, India.
    Mukherjee, Arun B.
    Helsinki University Environmental Research Centre, Finland.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chandrashekharam, Dornadula
    Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai-400076, India.
    Groundwater and Sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives and Challenges2008Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater is the most important source of domestic, industrial, and agricultural water and also a finite resource. Population growth has created an unprecedented demand for water, with the situation most critical in the developing world, where several million people depend on contaminated groundwater for drinking purposes. Geogenic contaminants, such as arsenic and fluoride at toxic levels, pose major environmental risks and endanger public health. This book is a collection of papers providing a multi-disciplinary overview for scientists and professionals involved in the sustainable development of groundwater resources.

  • 4.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Bhattacharya, ProsunKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.Chandrashekharam, D.
    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater: Occurrence, Remediation and Management2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, ProsunKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.Chandrashekharam, DornadulaIndian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai-400076, India.
    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater: Occurrences, Remediation and Management: Proceedings of the Pre-Congress Workshop "Natural Arsenic in Groundwater", 32nd International Geological Congress, Florence, Italy, 18-19 August 20042005Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater is an important resource that serves as a backbone of human development. In several regions -mostly in developing countries- groundwater from sedimentary and hard rock aquifers used for drinking are naturally contaminated with arsenic. In different countries in Asia such as eastern India, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam, the situation of arsenic toxicity is alarming and severe health problems are reported amongst the inhabitants relying on groundwater as sources of water for drinking purposes. Arsenic occurrences in groundwater in Bengal Delta Plain of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is one of the largest environmental health disaster of the present century, where at least 50 million people is at risk of cancer and other arsenic related diseases due to the consumption of high arsenic groundwater. In these same countries, land and agricultural sustainability is threatened by the use of arsenic contaminated irrigation water. In several Middle- and South-American countries, for example in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, high arsenic is reported in natural waters. In Argentina, at least 1.2 million people are affected. Elevated levels of natural arsenic in groundwater due to geogenic sources, is therefore an issue of primary environmental concern, which limits the use of these resources for drinking or other purposes, and hinders the economic and social development. Hence there is need to improve our understanding on the genesis of high arsenic groundwaters from the various aquifers in order to develop strategies of e to improve the socio-economic status of the affected regions.

  • 6.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Nath, B.
    Naidu, R.
    Ng, J.
    Guilherme, L. R. G.
    Ma, L. Q.
    Kim, K. -W
    Jean, J. -S
    Arsenic ecotoxicology: The interface between geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere2013In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 262, p. 883-886Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Fernanda Mellano, M.
    Ramirez, Antonio E.
    Storniolo, Angel del R.
    Martin, Raul A.
    Cortes, Julia
    Litter, Marta I.
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Arsenic removal from groundwater of the Chaco-Pampean Plain (Argentina) using natural geological materials as adsorbents2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1297-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of natural geological materials for arsenic (As) removal is an emerging solution at a household level for poor people in remote rural settlements, especially when the materials are locally available and can be collected by the local population. Their low or zero cost makes these materials very attractive compared with synthetic or commercial materials. Sometimes, this may be the only option to provide safe water to very poor settlements. Their suitability for As removal from water is mainly due to adsorption, co-precipitation and ion exchange processes involving Fe- and Al-rich minerals and clay minerals present in the soils or sediments. In the present study, various clay-rich soils from the Santiago del Estero province (SDE, NW Argentina) and, for comparison, a laterite from the Misiones province have been tested as adsorbents for As in shallow naturally contaminated groundwaters of the Rio Dulce alluvial aquifer in SDE. Batch adsorption experiments showed higher As(V) removal for the Misiones laterite sample (99 %) as compared with the soils from SDE (40-53 %), which can be related to lower contents of water-soluble and oxalate extractable Al and Fe in the last samples. These results suggest the application of the Misiones laterite soil as an alternative for As removal. However, high transportation costs from Misiones to SDE can be an economical restriction for the low-income population of SDE.

  • 8.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jakariya, Md
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Litter, M.I.
    Garcia, M.E.
    Arsenic-safe aquifers as a socially acceptable source of safe drinking water: What can rural Latin America learn from Bangladesh experiences?2009In: Natural Arsenic in Groundwater of Latin America: Occurrence, health impact and remediation, The Netherlands: CRC Press/Balkema , 2009, p. 677-685Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Chen, G.
    Editors’ foreword2014In: Sustainable Energy Solutions in Agriculture, CRC Press , 2014, p. xxxv-xxxviChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Chen, G.
    Tomaszewska, B.
    Ghaffour, N.
    Mushtaq, S.
    Hamawand, I.
    Reardon-Smith, K.
    Maraseni, T.
    Banhazi, T.
    Mahmoudi, H.
    Goosen, M.
    Antille, D. L.
    Solar, wind and geothermal energy applications in agriculture: Back to the future?2017In: Geothermal, Wind and Solar Energy Applications in Agriculture and Aquaculture, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 1-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chen, Guangnan
    Yusaf, Talal
    Chen, Shulin
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Sustainable energy and climate protection solutions in agriculture2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 114, no SI, p. 735-736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Ghaffour, Noreddine
    Mahmoudi, Hacene
    Goosen, Mattheus
    Mushtaq, Shahbaz
    Hoinkis, Jan
    Low-cost low-enthalpy geothermal heat for freshwater production: Innovative applications using thermal desalination processes2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 43, p. 196-206Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study is dedicated to exploring different types of low-cost low-enthalpy geothermal and their potential integration with conventional thermal-based water desalination and treatment technologies to deliver energy efficient, environmentally friendly solutions for water desalination and treatment, addressing global water crises. Our in-depth investigation through reviews of various low-enthalpy geothermal and conventional thermal-based technologies suggest that the geothermal option is superior to the solar option if low-cost geothermal heat is available because it provides a constant heat source in contrast to solar. Importantly, the stable heat source further allows up-scaling ( >1000 m(3)/day), which is not currently possible with solar. Solar-geothermal hybrid constellations may also be suitable in areas where both sources are available. The review also discovers that the innovative Membrane distillation (MD) process is very promising as it can be used for many different water compositions, salinity and temperature ranges. Either the geothermal water itself can be desalinated/treated or the geothermal heat can be used to heat feed water from other sources using heat exchangers. However, there are only few economic analyses for large-scale MD units and these are based on theoretical models using often ;uncertain assumptions resulting in a large variety of results.

  • 13.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630). Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Karlsruhe, Germany .
    Litter, M. I.
    Nicolli, H. B.
    Hoinkis, J.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Identifying occurrences of groundwater arsenic in Latin America: A continent-wide problem and challenge2010In: Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2010, p. 512-516Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Litter, Marta
    Ciminelli, Virginia S. T.
    Eugenia Morgada, Maria
    Cornejo, Lorena
    Hoyos, Sofia Garrido
    Hoinkis, Jan
    Teresa Alarcon-Herrera, Ma
    Aurora Armienta, Maria
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Emerging mitigation needs and sustainable options for solving the arsenic problems of rural and isolated urban areas in Latin America: A critical analysis2010In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 44, no 19, p. 5828-5845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, current information about the contamination of ground- and surface-water resources by arsenic from geogenic sources in Latin America is presented together with possible emerging mitigation solutions. The problem is of the same order of magnitude as other world regions, such as SE Asia, but it is often not described in English. Despite the studies undertaken by numerous local researchers, and the identification of proven treatment methods for the specific water conditions encountered, no technologies have been commercialized due to a current lack of funding and technical assistance. Emerging, low-cost technologies to mitigate the problem of arsenic in drinking water resources that are suitable for rural and urban areas lacking centralized water supplies have been evaluated. The technologies generally use simple and low-cost equipment that can easily be handled and maintained by the local population. Experiences comprise (i) coagulation/filtration with iron and aluminum salts, scaled-down for small community-and household-scale-applications, (ii) adsorption techniques using low-cost arsenic sorbents, such as geological materials (clays, laterites, soils, limestones), natural organic-based sorbents (natural biomass), and synthetic materials. TiO2-heterogeneous photocatalysis and zerovalent iron, especially using nanoscale particles, appear to be promising emergent technologies. Another promising innovative method for rural communities is the use of constructed wetlands using native perennial plants for arsenic rhizofiltration. Smallscale simple reverse osmosis equipment (which can be powered by wind or solar energy) that is suitable for small communities can also be utilized. The individual benefits of the different methods have been evaluated in terms of (i) size of the treatment device, (ii) arsenic concentration and distribution of species, chemical composition and grade of mineralization in the raw water, (iii) guidelines for the remaining As concentration, (iv) economical constrains, (v) complexity of installation and maintenance, and infrastructure constraints (e.g. electricity needs). (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Litter, Marta I.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Arsenic in Latin America, an unrevealed continent: Occurrence, health effects and mitigation2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 429, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Litter, Marta I.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Targeting arsenic-safe aquifers for drinking water supplies2010In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, ISSN 0269-4042, E-ISSN 1573-2983, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, 70 countries worldwide are affected by groundwater contamination by arsenic (As) released from predominantly geogenic sources. Consequently, the As problem is becoming a global issue. The option to target As-safe aquifers, which uses geological, geochemical, hydrogeological, morphological and climatic similarities to delimit As-safe aquifers, appears as a sustainable mitigation option. Two pilot areas, Meghna Flood Plain in Matlab Upazila, representative of Bengal Delta in Bangladesh, and Rio Dulce Alluvial Cone, representing a typical aquifer setting in the Chaco-Pampean Plain in Argentina groundwater As occurrence, were compared. In rural Bangladesh, As removal techniques have been provided to the population, but with low social acceptance. In contrast, "targeting As-safe aquifers" was socially accepted in Bangladesh, where sediment color could be used to identify As-safe aquifer zones and to install safe wells. The investigation in Argentina is more complex because of very different conditions and sources of As. Targeting As-safe aquifers could be a sustainable option for many rural areas and isolated peri-urban areas.

  • 17.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Litter, Marta I.
    Parvez, Faruque
    Roman-Ross, Gabriela
    Nicolli, Hugo B.
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Liu, Chen-Wuing
    Lopez, Dina
    Armienta, Maria A.
    Guilherme, Luiz R. G.
    Gomez Cuevas, Alina
    Cornejo, Lorena
    Cumbal, Luis
    Toujaguez, Regla
    One century of arsenic exposure in Latin America: A review of history and occurrence from 14 countries2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 429, p. 2-35Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global impact on public health of elevated arsenic (As) in water supplies is highlighted by an increasing number of countries worldwide reporting high As concentrations in drinking water. In Latin America, the problem of As contamination in water is known in 14 out of 20 countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and Uruguay. Considering the 1 0 mu g/L limit for As in drinking water established by international and several national agencies, the number of exposed people is estimated to be about 14 million. Health effects of As exposure were identified for the first time already in the 1910s in Bellville (Cordoba province, Argentina). Nevertheless, contamination of As in waters has been detected in 10 Latin American countries only within the last 10 to 15 years. Arsenic is mobilized predominantly from young volcanic rocks and their weathering products. In alluvial aquifers, which are water sources frequently used for water supply, desorption of As from metal oxyhydroxides at high pH (>8) is the predominant mobility control; redox conditions are moderate reducing to oxidizing and As(V) is the predominant species. In the Andes, the Middle American cordillera and the Transmexican Volcanic Belt, oxidation of sulfide minerals is the primary As mobilization process. Rivers that originate in the Andean mountains, transport As to more densely populated areas in the lowlands (e.g. Rimac river in Peru, Pilcomayo river in Bolivia/Argentina/Paraguay). In many parts of Latin America, As often occurs together with F and B; in the Chaco-Pampean plain As is found additionally with V. Mo and U whereas in areas with sulfide ore deposits As often occurs together with heavy metals. These co-occurrences and the anthropogenic activities in mining areas that enhance the mobilization of As and other pollutants make more dramatic the environmental problem.

  • 18.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Maity, J. P.
    Nath, B.
    Baba, A.
    Gunduz, O.
    Kulp, T. R.
    Jean, J. -S
    Kar, S.
    Yang, H. -J
    Tseng, Y. -J
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chen, C. -Y
    Naturally occurring arsenic in terrestrial geothermal systems of western Anatolia, Turkey: Potential role in contamination of freshwater resources2013In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 262, p. 951-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) contamination in terrestrial geothermal systems has been identified in many countries worldwide. Concentrations higher than 0.01mg/L are detrimental to human health. We examined potential consequences for As contamination of freshwater resources based on hydrogeochemical investigations of geothermal waters in deep wells and hot springs collected from western Anatolia, Turkey. We analyzed samples for major ions and trace element concentrations. Temperature of geothermal waters in deep wells showed extreme ranges (40 and 230°C), while, temperature of hot spring fluids was up to 90°C. The Piper plot illustrated two dominant water types: Na-HCO3 - type for geothermal waters in deep wells and Ca-HCO3 - type for hot spring fluids. Arsenic concentration ranged from 0.03 to 1.5mg/L. Dominance of reduced As species, i.e., As(III), was observed in our samples. The Eh value ranged between -250 and 119mV, which suggests diverse geochemical conditions. Some of the measured trace elements were found above the World Health Organization guidelines and Turkish national safe drinking water limits. The variation in pH (range: 6.4-9.3) and As in geothermal waters suggest mixing with groundwater. Mixing of geothermal waters is primarily responsible for contamination of freshwater resources and making them unsuitable for drinking or irrigation.

  • 19.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH. National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, Australia .
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Geothermal arsenic: Occurrence, mobility and environmental implications2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 42, p. 1214-1222Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) contamination in geothermal systems has been identified in many areas of the world. Arsenic mobilization from rocks and mineral phases into geothermal fluids depends on available As sources, geochemical conditions and microbiological activity. In deep geothermal reservoirs As mobilization is predominantly from As-bearing pyrite at temperatures of 150-250 degrees C, and at higher temperatures also from arsenopyrite. Highest As concentrations, mostly in the range of thousands to tens of thousands of mu g/L and in case of Los Humeros (Mexico) even of up to 162,000 mu g/L are found in volcanic geothermal systems whereas in low- and high-enthalpy sedimentary geothermal systems they reach only about 2000 mu g/L. At many sites, uprising geothermal waters contaminate shallow water resources. From the geothermal springs, those with NaCl water type have the highest As concentrations; these waters correspond to original reservoir waters which were not significantly altered during its ascent. In the geothermal reservoir and deeper parts of hydrothermal system, As is predominantly present as neutral H3As(III)O-3 (arsenius acid) and under sulfidic conditions also as thioarsenites; close to the earth's surface oxidation through atmospheric oxygen to As(V) species may occur; however, this is a slow process. As(III) emerging in geothermal springs is oxidized quickly through microbial catalysis and often most As is present as As(V), at a distance of few meters from the spring outlet. This review highlights the occurrence and distribution of geothermal As worldwide, its sources and its mobilization and the presence of different As species in geothermal fluids considering different geological settings and processes involving geothermal fluids rising from deep geothermal reservoirs to the earth's surface where it may mix with shallow groundwater or surface waters and contaminate these resources. The microbial diversity of hot spring environments which plays an important role to mobilize the As by oxidation and reduction process in the geothermal system is also addressed.

  • 20.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Nath, Bibhash
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Liu, Chen-Wuing
    Aurora Armienta, Maria
    Moreno Lopez, Myriam V.
    Lopez, Dina L.
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Cornejo, Lorena
    Lauer Macedo, Luciene Fagundes
    Tenuta Filho, Alfredo
    Arsenic in the human food chain: the Latin American perspective2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 429, p. 92-106Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many regions of Latin America are widely reported for the occurrence of high arsenic (As) in groundwater and surface water due to a combination of geological processes and/or anthropogenic activities. In this paper, we review the available literature (both in English and Spanish languages) to delineate human As exposure pathways through the food chain. Numerous studies show that As accumulations in edible plants and crops are mainly associated with the presence of high As in soils and irrigation waters. However, factors such as As speciation, type and composition of soil, and plant species have a major control on the amount of As uptake. Areas of high As concentrations in surface water and groundwater show high As accumulations in plants, fish/shellfish, livestock meat, milk and cheese. Such elevated As concentrations in food may result in widespread health risks to local inhabitants, including health of indigenous populations and residents living close to mining industries. Some studies show that As can be transferred from the water to prepared meals, thereby magnifying the As content in the human diet. Arsenic speciation might also change during food preparation, especially during high temperature cooking, such as grilling and frying. Finally, the review of the available literature demonstrates the necessity of more rigorous studies in evaluating pathways of As exposure through the human food chain in Latin America.

  • 21.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Sracek, O.
    Hydrogeochemistry principles for geochemical modeling2011In: Geochemical Modeling of Groundwater, Vadose and Geothermal Systems, CRC Press , 2011, p. 3-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide diversity of physical and chemical processes control the distribution of species in waters in the vadose zone above the water table, and in the saturated zone below. The mineralogical composition of rocks or sediments, chemical reactions between solid, aqueous and gas phases, and oxidation/reduction (redox) processes are principal factors that influence the chemical composition of vadose-zone, ground-and surface waters, and the concentrations and mobilities of individual species. 

  • 22.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Tomaszewska, B.
    Poland.
    Ghaffour, N.
    Saudi Arabia.
    Hamawand, I.
    Australia.
    Mahmoudi, H.
    Algeria.
    Goosen, M.
    Saudi Arabia.
    Coupling geothermal direct heat with agriculture2018In: Geothermal Water Management, CRC Press, 2018, p. 277-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the agriculture and agri-food chain industries there is a strong nexus between food, energy and water as it consumes about one-third of the global energy and 80-90% of the world’s freshwater production; freshwater production consumes about 15% of the global energy production (FAO, 2011a, 2011b; Hoff, 2011; IEA, 2012; IRENA, 2015). Therefore, the agri-food chain should be made independent from the use of fossil fuels, which have decreasing and fluctuating reserves but increasing long-term trend in cost, by coupling it to renewable energies such as geothermal. Geothermal water can not only provide energy, but at the same time a source of freshwater (possibly requiring prior treatment, that can, in turn, be done using geothermal heat as the energy source) thereby providing secure, accessible and environmentally sustainable supplies for both of these commodities. It can therefore play a significant role in contributing to future global food security and climate protection as well as other aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The benefits of using geothermal energy are often underestimated, despite it being a limitless, sustainable and constant heat source, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This makes its use technically simple, which contrasts with other renewables such as solar energy. Development and commercialization of geothermal water as energy and freshwater sources could have a significant contribution in the reduction of costs in the agro-food sector. However, much work remains to be done to make better use of geothermal energy.

  • 23.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Yusaf, Talal
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Nelson, Emily
    Mamat, Rizalman
    Mahlia, T. M. Indra
    Algae-biomass for fuel, electricity and agriculture2014In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 78, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Zilberbrand, M.
    Geochemical modeling of groundwater, vadose and geothermal systems2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Geochemical modeling is an important tool in environmental studies, and in the areas of subsurface and surface hydrology, pedology, water resources management, mining geology, geothermal resources, hydrocarbon geology, and related areas dealing with the exploration and extraction of natural resources. The book fills a gap in the literature through its discussion of geochemical modeling, which simulates the chemical and physical processes affecting the distribution of chemical species in liquid, gas, and solid phases. Geochemical modeling applies to a diversity of subsurface environments, from the vadose zone close to the Earth's surface, down to deep-seated geothermal reservoirs. This book provides the fundamental thermodynamic concepts of liquid-gas-solid phase systems. It introduces the principal types of geochemical models, such as speciation, reaction-path or forward, inverse- and reactive-transport models, together with examples of the most common codes and the best-practices for constructing geochemical models. The physical laws describing homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions, their kinetics, and the transport of reactive solutes are presented. The partial differential or algebraic equations representing these laws, and the principal numerical methods that allow approximate solutions of these equations that can provide useful solutions to model different geochemical processes, are discussed in detail. Case studies applying geochemical models in different scientific areas and environmental settings, conclude the book. The book is addressed to students, teachers, other professionals, and to the institutions involved in water, geothermal and hydrocarbon resources, mining, and environmental management. The book should prove useful to undergraduate and graduate students, postgraduates, professional geologists and geophysicists, engineers, environmental scientists, soil scientists, hydrochemists, and others interested in water and geochemistry. 

  • 25.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Zilberbrand, Michael
    Editors’ preface2011In: Geochemical Modeling of Groundwater, Vadose and Geothermal Systems, p. xxi-xxiiiArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Chatterjee, Debashis
    et al.
    Haider, Dipti
    Majumder, Santanu
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Nath, Bibhash
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhowmick, Subhamoy
    Mukherjee-Goswami, Aishwarya
    Saha, Debasree
    Hazra, Rasmani
    Maity, Palash B.
    Chatterjee, Debankur
    Mukherjee, Abhijit
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Assessment of arsenic exposure from groundwater and rice in Bengal Delta Region, West Bengal, India2010In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 44, no 19, p. 5803-5812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) induced identifiable health outcomes are now spreading across Indian subcontinent with continuous discovery of high As concentrations in groundwater. This study deals with groundwater hydrochemistry vis-a-vis As exposure assessment among rural population in Chakdaha block, West Bengal, India. The water quality survey reveals that 96% of the tubewells exceed WHO guideline value (10 mu g/L of As). The groundwaters are generally anoxic (-283 to -22 mV) with circum-neutral pH (6.3 to 7.8). The hydrochemistry is dominated by HCO3- (208 to 440 mg/L), Ca2+ (79 to 178 mg/L) and Mg2+ (17 to 45 mg/L) ions along with high concentrations of As-T (As total, below detection limit to 0.29 mg/L), Fe-T (Fe total, 1.2 to 16 mg/L), and Fe(II) (0.74 to 16 mg/L). The result demonstrates that Fe(II)-Fe(III) cycling is the dominant process for the release of As from aquifer sediments to groundwater (and vice versa), which is mainly controlled by the local biogeochemical conditions. The exposure scenario reveals that the consumption of groundwater and rice are the major pathways of As accumulation in human body, which is explained by the dietary habit of the surveyed population. Finally, regular awareness campaign is essential as part of the management and prevention of health outcomes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 27. Chen, C. -Y
    et al.
    Maity, J. P.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Baba, A.
    Gunduz, O.
    Occurrence of arsenic and related microbial signature of hydrothermal systems in Western Turkey2012In: Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2012, p. 486-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The naturally occurring aqueous Arsenic (As) and other toxic elements are found around the world. The present study concentrates on arsenic concentrations, speciation and related microbial diversity in a hydrothermal system in Western Turkey. The surface temperatures of hot springs reach up to 90°C and deep well (reservoir) temperatures vary in the range of 40 to 230°C. The elements such as As, B, Br, Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, V and Zn are found in high concentration in hydrothermal waters. Hydrogeochemically, Seferihisar hot spring exhibited a Na-Cl water type. On the other hand, Karahayit, Pamukkale, Emirfaki, Alaşehir and Sart exhibit a Ca-HCO 3 water type and Çitgöl exhibited a Na-HCO 3-SO 4 water type. The arsenic (As) concentrations in geothermal waters of Western Anatolia have been detected to range from 0.03 mg/L to 1.5 mg/L, including Buharkent (İnalti) (1.50 ± 0.005 mg/L), Kizildere (1.13 ± 0.005 mg/L), Eynal (0.71 ± 0.005 mg/L) and Sarayköy (0.06 ± 0.004 mg/L). Arsenic (III) is the dominant species in geothermal water of Western Anatolia. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of bacterial diversity show that the thermophilic, sulfur/thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium (Thiobacter subterraneus) is present in Kula geothermal water and mesophilic sulfur- and thiosulfate-oxidizing Sulfurovum lithotrophicum bacterium occurs in Sarayköy geothermal spring. Also, Bacillus fumarioli, (a thermophilic, aerobic endospore forming bacterium growing on (NH 4) 2 SO 4, MgSO 4 and MnSO 4 at 50-55°C), Schlegelella thermodepolymerans and Methylocaldum szegediense are rich in geothermal water.

  • 28. Chen, G.
    et al.
    Schmidt, E.
    Maraseni, T.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Banhazi, T.
    Antille, D. L.
    Opportunities of adopting renewable energy for the nursery industry in Australia2017In: Geothermal, Wind and Solar Energy Applications in Agriculture and Aquaculture, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 115-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29. Figoli, A.
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hoinkis, J.
    Fluoride, uranium and arsenic: Occurrence, mobility, chemistry, human health impacts and concerns2016In: Membrane Technologies for Water Treatment: Removal of Toxic Trace Elements with Emphasis on Arsenic, Fluoride and Uranium, CRC Press , 2016, p. 3-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30. Figoli, A.
    et al.
    Hoinkis, J.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Editors' foreword2016In: Membrane Technologies for Water Treatment: Removal of Toxic Trace Elements with Emphasis on Arsenic, Fluoride and Uranium, p. xlvii-xlviiiArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Hamawand, I.
    et al.
    Lewis, L.
    Ghaffour, N.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Desalination of salty water using vacuum spray dryer driven by solar energy2017In: Desalination, ISSN 0011-9164, E-ISSN 1873-4464, Vol. 404, p. 182-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses evaporation under vacuum condition with the aid from solar energy and the recovered waste heat from the vacuum pump. It is a preliminary attempt to design an innovative solar-based evaporation system under vacuum. The design details, equipment required, theoretical background and work methodology are covered in this article. Theoretically, based on the energy provided by the sun during the day, the production rate of pure water can be around 15 kg/m2/day. Assumptions were made for the worst case scenario where only 30% of the latent heat of evaporation is recycled and the ability of the dark droplet to absorb sun energy is around 50%. Both the waste heat from the pump and the heat collected from the photovoltaic (PV) panels are proposed to raise the temperature of the inlet water to the system to its boiling point at the selected reduced pressure.

  • 32. Hoinkis, J.
    et al.
    Islam, R.
    Akhtarul Islam, M.
    Korejba, W.
    Ding, D.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630). Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Karlsruhe, Germany .
    Energy-efficient small-scale reverse osmosis units - A promising approach for arsenic removal from drinking water2010In: Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2010, p. 429-430Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Hoinkis, J.
    et al.
    Pätzold, C.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Arsenic removal by small-scale reverse osmosis units2010In: The Global Arsenic Problem: Challenges for Safe Water Production, CRC Press , 2010, p. 147-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past three decades, the occurrence of high concentrations of arsenic (As) in drinking water has been recognized as a severe global public-health concern (Bhattacharya et al. 2002, Mandal and Suzuki 2002, Ng et al. 2003). The global As-contamination scenario has changed considerably in recent years, with the discovery of new As affected sites. The delayed health effects of exposure to As, the lack of common definitions and of local awareness, as well as poor reporting in affected areas are all major problems in determining the extent of the arsenic-in-drinking-water problem (WHO 2008). 

  • 34. Islam, A. B. M. R.
    et al.
    Maity, J. P.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chen, C. -Y
    Bhowmik, B. K.
    Tazaki, K.
    Arsenic mineral dissolution and possible mobilization in mineral-microbe-groundwater environment2013In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 262, p. 989-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in the nature as ores or minerals. It has been attracted much attention for the global public health issue, especially for groundwater As contamination. The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics of microbes in groundwater where As-minerals were dissolved. An ex situ experiment was conducted with 7 standard As-minerals in bacteria-free groundwater and stored in experimental vessels for 1 year without supplementary nutrients. The pH (6.7-8.4) and EhS.H.E. (24-548mV) changed between initial (0 day) and final stages (365 days) of experiment. The dissolution of As was detected higher from arsenolite (4240±8.69mg/L) and native arsenic (4538±9.02mg/L), whereas moderately dissolved from orpiment (653±3.56mg/L) and realgar (319±2.56mg/L) in compare to arsenopyrite (85±1.25mg/L) and tennantite (3±0.06mg/L). Optical microscopic, scanning electron microscopic observations and flurometric enumeration revealed the abundance of As-resistant bacillus, coccus and filamentous types of microorganisms on the surface of most of As-mineral. 4'-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained epifluorescence micrograph confirmed the presence of DNA and carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) staining method revealed the enzymatically active bacteria on the surface of As-minerals such as in realgar (As4S4). Therefore, the microbes enable to survive and mobilize the As in groundwater by dissolution/bioweathering of As-minerals.

  • 35. Jean, J. -S
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Chen, C. -J
    Guo, H. -R
    Liu, C. -W
    Lin, T. -F
    Chen, Y. -H
    The Taiwan crisis: A showcase of the global arsenic problem2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1950s, the residents of the southwestern coastal areas of Taiwan suffered greatly from Blackfoot disease (BFD) due to the consumption of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. Groundwater with high levels of arsenic in southwestern and northeastern Taiwan received much attention. After arsenic-safe tap water was utilized for drinking instead of groundwater in the 1970s, BFD cases decreased greatly. After 1990, no new BFD cases were reported, and as a consequence, BFD problems disregarded. However, arsenic is still present in the groundwater.This book will improve the knowledge and understanding of the occurrence and genesis of arsenic-rich groundwaters in Taiwan. It deals with constraints on the mobility of arsenic in groundwater, its uptake from soil and water by plants, arsenic-propagation through the food chain, human health impacts, and arsenic-removal technologies. Taiwan case experiences are described in this book and can be applied worldwide. This book is a state-of-the-art overview of research on arsenic in Taiwan and is designed to: • create interest in regions within Taiwan that are affected by the presence of arseniferous aquifers; • draw attention from the international scientific community; • increase awareness among researchers, administrators, policy makers, and company executives; • improve the international cooperation on arsenic problems worldwide. 

  • 36.
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    et al.
    Dept of Earth Sciences, NCKU, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.
    Bundschuh, JochenKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.Bhattacharya, ProsunKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The congress "Arsenic in the Environment" offers an international, multi- and interdisciplinary discussion platform for arsenic research aimed at short-term solutions of problems with considerable social impact, rather than only focusing on cutting edge and breakthrough research in physical, chemical, toxicological, medical and other specific issues on arsenic on a broader environmental realm. The congress "Arsenic in the Environment" was first organized in Mexico City (As 2006 ) followed by As 2008 in Valencia, Spain. The Third International Congress As 2010 was held in Tainan, Taiwan from May 17-21, 2010 entitled: "Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases". The session topics comprised:1. Geology + hydrogeology of arsenic;2. Ecological effects: Arsenic in soils, plants and food chain;3. Marine + terrestrial biota;4. Health effects on humans: Epidemiology + biomarkers;5. Toxicological effects;6. Assessment and remediation;7. Analytical methods.

    Hosting this congress in Taiwan was especially relevant, because the endemic Blackfoot Disease, related to the arsenic uptake from drinking water supplied by artesian wells, was discovered here half a century ago. Since then Taiwan has become an important region specializing in arsenic research. This volume presents the extended abstracts of the congress and will give the latest state of the art knowledge based on current research performed by the global scientific community.

  • 37.
    Kabay, Nalan
    et al.
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hendry, Bruce
    Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Bryjak, Marek
    Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland.
    Yoshizuka, Kazuharu
    Kitakyushu University, Japan.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The Global Arsenic Problem: Challenges for Safe Water Production2010Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prevalent and increasingly important issue, arsenic removal continues to be one of the most important areas of water treatment. Conventional treatment plants may employ several methods for removing arsenic from water. Commonly used processes include oxidation, sedimentation, coagulation and filtration, lime treatment, adsorption onto sorptive media, ion exchange, and membrane filtration. However, in the most affected regions, large conventional treatment plants may not be appropriate and factors such as cost and acceptability as well as performance must be considered. This book, published in cooperation with leading experts in this field, provides a thorough analysis of the problems, solutions, and possible alternatives to achieve safe water production on a global scale.

  • 38. Kar, Sandeep
    et al.
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Liu, Chia-Chuan
    Liu, Chen-Wuing
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lu, Hsueh-Yu
    Health risks for human intake of aquacultural fish: Arsenic bioaccumulation and contamination2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1266-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquacultural tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus L.) and shrimp (Penaeus monodon L.) from groundwater-cultured ponds in southwestern Taiwan were analyzed to estimate arsenic (As) bioaccumulation and the potential health risk to human intake. Most of aquacultural ponds exhibited higher arsenic than maximum allowed concentrations (50 mu g L(-1)) in pond water of Taiwan. Arsenic levels in tilapia in Budai, Yichu and Beimen were 0.92 +/- 0.52 mu g g(-1), 0.93 +/- 0.19 mu g g(-1) and 0.76 +/- 0.03 mu g g(-1), respectively and in shrimp was 0.36 +/- 0.01 mu g g(-1) in Beimen. Total arsenic in tilapia is highly correlated (R(2) = 0.80) with total arsenic concentration of pond water. Total arsenic in fish showed high correlation with that in bone (R(2) = 0.98), head (R(2) = 0.97) and tissue (R(2) = 0.96). Organic arsenic species (DMA) was found higher relative to inorganic species of As(III) and As(V). The average percent contribution of inorganic arsenic to total arsenic in fish samples was 12.5% and ranged between 11.7 to 14.2%. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for total arsenic in fish ranged from 10.3 to 22.1, whereas BAF for inorganic arsenic ranged from 1.33 to 2.82. The mean human health cancer risk associated with the ingestion of inorganic arsenic in the fish was estimated at 2.36 x 10(-4) +/- 0.99 x 10(-4), which is over 200 times greater than a de Minimus cancer risk of 1 x 10(-6). The mean human health hazard quotient associated with ingesting inorganic arsenic in the fish was 1.22 +/- 0.52, indicating that expected human exposure exceeds the reference dose for non-cancer health effects by 22%. These results suggest that the inhabitants in this region are being subjected to moderately elevated arsenic exposure through the consumption of tilapia and shrimp raised in aquaculture ponds.

  • 39. Kar, Sandeep
    et al.
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Liu, Chia-Chuan
    Nath, Bibhash
    Lee, Yao-Chang
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Li, Zhaohui
    Role of organic matter and humic substances in the binding and mobility of arsenic in a Gangetic aquifer2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1231-1238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) enrichment in groundwater has led to extensive research, particularly on the factors responsible for its release into groundwater. In the Gangetic plain, organic matter driven microbial reduction of Fe-oxyhydroxides is considered as the most plausible mechanism of As release into groundwater. However, the role of organic matter in the aqueous environment is not well known and particularly that of organometallic complex. In this study, we have characterized bulk sediment and groundwater samples, collected from Barasat, West Bengal, India, to understand the effect of organic matter in the binding and mobility of As in the subsurface environment. The results showed a moderate correlation (R(2) = 0.49, p < 0.05) between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and As in groundwater, suggesting that DOC has a role in releasing As into groundwater. The relative fluorescent intensity (RFI) of the dissolved humic substances in groundwater showed a maximum value of 65 QSU (mean: 47 +/- 8 QSU). FT-IR spectra of the extracted humic acid fractions of the sediment showed COO-, C = O, OH, and C = C (aromatic ring) functional groups, which may act as a chelating agents with the metal(loid)s. FT-IR spectra of the HA-As complex exhibited specific peaks at 1242 and 832 cm(-1) in the fingerprint region. This is similar to the extracted humic acid fractions of the Gangetic sediment, suggesting binding of As with humic substances.

  • 40.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Shokri, Atefeh
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Bioprocess Technology (closed 20130101).
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Von Brömssen, M.
    Microbial characterization of Holocene alluvial sediments in the Meghna Flood Plain of Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh2010In: Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2010, p. 140-142Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Litter, M. I.
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Emerging options for solving the arsenic problems of rural and periurban areas in Latin America2012In: Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2012, p. 267-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging, low-cost technologies to mitigate the problem of arsenic in drinking water resources of Latin America, suitable for rural and periurban areas lacking centralized water supplies have been evaluated. The technologies use generally simple and low-cost equipment that can easily be handled and maintained by the local population. Experiences comprise coagulation/filtration with iron and aluminum salts, scaled-down for small community- and household-scale-applications, adsorption techniques using low-cost arsenic sorbents, such as geological materials (clays, laterites, soils, limestones), natural organic-based sorbents (natural biomass), and synthetic materials, use of constructed wetlands with native perennial plants for arsenic rhizofiltration, capacitive deionization, zerovalent iron especially using nanoparticles and solar technologies including titanium dioxide-heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  • 42. Liu, Chia-Chuan
    et al.
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Sracek, Ondra
    Kar, Sandeep
    Li, Zhaohui
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Lu, Hsueh-Yu
    Biogeochemical interactions among the arsenic, iron, humic substances, and microbes in mud volcanoes in southern Taiwan2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1218-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluid and mud samples collected from Hsiaokunshui (HKS), Wushanting (WST), Yenshuikeng (YSK), Kunshuiping (KSP), Liyushan (LYS), and Sinyangnyuhu (SYNH) mud volcanoes of southwestern Taiwan were characterized for major ions, humic substances (HS) and trace elements concentrations. The relationship between the release of arsenic (As) and activities of sulfate-reducing bacteria has been assessed to understand relevant geochemical processes in the mud volcanoes. Arsenic (0.02-0.06 mg/L) and humic substances (4.13 x 10(-4) to 1.64 x 10(-3) mM) in the fluids of mud volcanoes showed a positive correlation (r = 0.99, p < 0.05) except in Liyushan mud volcano. Arsenic and iron in mud sediments formed two separate groups i) high As, but low Fe in HKS, WST, and SYNH; and ii) low As, but high Fe in the YSK, KSP, and LYS mud volcanoes. The Eh(S.H.E). values of the mud volcano liquids were characterized by mild to strongly reducing conditions. The HKS, SYNH, and WST mud volcanoes (near the Chishan Fault) belongs to strong reducing environment (-33 to -116 mV), whereas the LYS, YSK, and KSP mud volcanoes located near the coastal plain are under mild reducing environment (-11 to 172 mV). At low Eh values mud volcanoes, saturation index (SI) values of poorly crystalline phases such as amorphous ferric hydroxide indicate understaturation, whereas saturation is reached in relatively high Eh(S.H.E.) values mud volcanoes. Arsenic contents in sediments are low, presumably due to its release to fluids (As/Fe ratio in YSK, KSP, and LYS sediment: 4.86 x 10(-4)-6.20 x 10(-4)). At low Eh(S.H.E.) values (mild to strong reducing environment), arsenic may co-precipitate with sulfides as a consequence of sulfate reduction (As/Fe ratios in WST, HKS, and SYNH sediments: 0.42-0.69).

  • 43. Lopez, Dina L.
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Birkle, Peter
    Aurora Armienta, Maria
    Cumbal, Luis
    Sracek, Ondra
    Cornejo, Lorena
    Ormachea, Mauricio
    Arsenic in volcanic geothermal fluids of Latin America2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 429, p. 57-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous volcanoes, hot springs, fumaroles, and geothermal wells occur in the Pacific region of Latin America. These systems are characterized by high As concentrations and other typical geothermal elements such as Li and B. This paper presents a review of the available data on As concentrations in geothermal systems and their surficial discharges and As data on volcanic gases of Latin America. Data for geothermal systems in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Chile are presented. Two sources of As can be recognized in the investigated sites: Arsenic partitioned into volcanic gases and emitted in plumes and fumaroles, and arsenic in rocks of volcanic edifices that are leached by groundwaters enriched in volcanic gases. Water containing the most elevated concentrations of As are mature Ma-Cl fluids with relatively low sulfate content and As concentrations reaching up to 73.6 mg L-1 (Los Humeros geothermal field in Mexico), but more commonly ranging from a few mg L-1 to tens of mg L-1. Fluids derived from Na-Cl enriched waters formed through evaporation and condensation at shallower depths have As levels of only a few mu g L-1. Mixing of Na-Cl waters with shallower meteoric waters results in low to intermediate As concentrations (up to a few mg L-1). After the waters are discharged at the ground surface, As(III) oxidizes to As(V) and attenuation of As concentration can occur due to sorption and co-precipitation processes with iron minerals and organic matter present in sediments. Understanding the mechanisms of As enrichment in geothermal waters and their fate upon mixing with shallower groundwater and surface waters is important for the protection of water resources in Latin America.

  • 44. Mahmoudi, H.
    et al.
    Ghaffour, N.
    Goosen, M. T. F. A.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    A critical overview of renewable energy technologies for desalination2017In: Renewable Energy Technologies for Water Desalination, CRC Press , 2017, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid population growth and industrialization as well as climatic change have placed increasing strains on global potable water supplies (Caldera et al., 2016; Goosen et al., 2016; Sahin et al., 2016). In particular, the demand for this limited renewable resource is anticipated to intensify due to the requirements of the agricultural, manufacturing and urban sectors. The United Nations World Water Assessment Programme estimates that by 2030 only 60% of the worldwide water needs can be met (Connor, 2015). Additionally, while economic development opens up and advances economies, and creates new wealth, it can be argued that millions of people do not benefit directly from this financial progress (Goosen, 2013; Gottinger and Goosen, 2012). This poses new challenges to the effective governance of potable water resource systems. 

  • 45. Maity, J. P.
    et al.
    Hsu, C. -M
    Lin, T. -J
    Lee, W. -C
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Chen, C. -Y
    Removal of fluoride from water through bacterial-surfactin mediated novel hydroxyapatite nanoparticle and its efficiency assessment: Adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetic and adsorption Thermodynamics2018In: Environmental Nanotechnology, Monitoring and Management, ISSN 2215-1532, Vol. 9, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluoride contamination in water due to natural and anthropogenic activities has been documented as serious problems worldwide commanding a major threat to the environment. Present study focuses to synthesis bacterial-surfactin (Bacillus subtilis) mediated nano-hydroxyapatite (HAp), novel adsorbents for defluoridation. HAp particle size and morphology were controlled by varying temperature of 90–150 °C and pH of 7–11, respectively. The TEM and SEM micrographs reveal that the short-rod particle is observed 20–30 nm at 90 °C and pH 11. The ratio between the length (nm) and width (nm) of nanoparticle are decreased from 4.17 to 1.65 with increasing pH (7–11). The selected area diffraction (SAD) of particles are indicated uniform rod-like monocrystals. The XRD and FTIR observations were indicated the synthesized HAp nanoparticles were well-crystallized with purity phase and high quality. The study reflected that the fluoride removal from contaminated water by HAp was increased significantly (R2 = 99) with the increasing adsorbent concentration, temperature and time, with two-step adsorption process as the first portion a rapid adsorption occurs during first 90 min after which equilibrium is slowly achieved. The adsorption process is closer to Freundlich isotherm (R2 &gt; 98) than to Langmuir isotherm (R2 ≈ 92), indicating HAp as a good adsorbent (n &gt; 3). Above 97% of fluoride removal were noticed at a HAp dose of 0.06 g/10 mL. The adsorption kinetics more fit with pseudo-second-order (R2= 99) in compare to pseudo-first-order (R2 ≈ 91). The slope and intercept of Arrhenius equation indicated the activation/adsorption energy (Ea) of 3.199 kJ/mol and frequency factor (A) of 1.78 1/s. Adsorption thermodynamic parameters (free energy (ΔG &lt; 0), enthalpy (ΔH &gt; 0) and entropy (ΔS &gt; 0)) indicates the spontaneous and endothermic reactions of the adsorption process. Thus, newly synthesized HAp nanoparticles exhibit as a good adsorbent for fluoride removal, theoretically and experimentally being applicable for environmental pollution control.

  • 46. Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    et al.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Microalgae for third generation biofuel production, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and wastewater treatment: Present and future perspectives - A mini review2014In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 78, p. 104-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive use of fossil fuels is increasingly recognized as unsustainable as a consequence of depletion of supplies and the contribution of these fuels to climate change by GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions into the atmosphere. Microalgae indicate alternative renewable sustainable energy sources as they have a high potential for producing large amounts of biomass which in turn can be used for production of different third-generation biofuels at large scale. Microalgae transform the solar energy into the carbon storage products, leads to lipid accumulation, including TAG (triacylglycerols), which then can be transformed into biodiesel, bioethanol and biomethanol. This paper reviews the selection, production and accumulation of target bioenergy carrier's strains and their advantages as well as the technological development for oil, biodiesel, ethanol, methanol, biogas production and GHG mitigation. The feedstock of promising algal strain exhibits the suitable biofuel production. The current progress of hybrid-technologies (biomass production, wastewater treatment, GHG mitigation) for production of prime-products as biofuels offer atmospheric pollution control such as the reduction of GHG (CO2 fixation) coupling wastewater treatment with microalgae growth. The selection of efficient strain, microbial metabolism, cultivation systems, biomass production are key parameters of viable technology for microalgae-based biodiesel-production.

  • 47. Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    et al.
    Kar, Sandeep
    Liu, Jiann-Hong
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Santra, Subhas Chandra
    Liu, Chia-Chuan
    The potential for reductive mobilization of arsenic [As(V) to As(III)] by OSBH(2) (Pseudomonas stutzeri) and OSBH(5) (Bacillus cereus) in an oil-contaminated site2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1239-1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial reduction of arsenate [As(V)] plays an important role in arsenic (As) mobilization in aqueous environments. In this study, we investigated reduction of arsenate by different bacterial isolates such as OSBH(1) (GU329913), OSBH(2) (GU329914), OSBH(3) (GU329915), OSBH(4) (GU329916) and OSBH(5) (GU329917), isolated from the oil sludge of a sewage treatment plant operated by the China Petroleum Refinery Company in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan. Bacterial strains of pure culture were identified by 16S rRNA analysis (>= 99 % nucleotide similarity). Morphological and 16S rRNA analysis show that the isolate OSBH(1) is similar to E. coli, OSBH(2) is similar to P. stutzeri, OSBH(3) is similar to P. putida, OSBH(4) is similar to P. aeruginosa, and OSBH(5) is similar to B. Cereus. The As(V) was transformed to As(III) in the presence of isolates OSBH(2) and OSBH(5) by a detoxification process. The potential reduction rates of As(V) were higher in the presence of isolate OSBH(5) compared to the isolate OSBH(2). The microbial growth (cell/mL) of isolate OSBH(5) was significantly higher in culture medium compared to OSBH(2). The bacterial isolates such as OSBH(1), OSBH(3) and OSBH(4) were found to be incapable of transforming the As(V). It is concluded that the activity of the oil-degrading bacterial isolates described in this work contributes to the mobilization of As in the more toxic As(III) form that affects biotic life.

  • 48. Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    et al.
    Liu, Chia-Chuan
    Nath, Bibhash
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Kar, Sandeep
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Liu, Jiann-Hong
    Atla, Shashi B.
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Biogeochemical characteristics of Kuan-Tzu-Ling, Chung-Lun and Bao-Lai hot springs in southern Taiwan2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1207-1217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot springs are the important natural sources of geothermally heated groundwater from the Earth's crust. Kuan-Tzu-Ling (KTL), Chung-Lun (CL) and Bao-Lai (BL) are well-known hot springs in southern Taiwan. Fluid and mud (sediments) samples were collected from the eruption points of three hot springs for detailed biogeochemical characterization. The fluid sample displays relatively high concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) compared with K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NO(2)(-), and SO(4)(2-), suggesting a possible marine origin. The concentrations of Fe, Cr, Mn, Ni, V and Zn were significantly higher in the mud sediments compared with fluids, whereas high concentrations of As, Ba, Cu, Se, Sr and Rb were observed in the fluids. This suggests that electronegative elements were released during sediment-water interactions. High As concentration in the fluids was observed to be associated with low redox (Eh) conditions. The FTIR spectra of the humic acid fractions of the sediments showed the presence of possible functional groups of secondary amines, ureas, urethanesm (amide), and silicon. The sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacterium 99% similar to Desulfovibrio psychrotolerans (GU329907) were rich in the CL hot spring while mesophilic, proteolytic, thiosulfate-and sulfur-reducing bacterium that 99% similar to Clostridium sulfidigenes (GU329908) were rich in the BL hot spring.

  • 49. Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    et al.
    Nath, Bibhash
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Kar, Sandeep
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Chatterjee, Debashis
    Ahmed, Kazi Matin
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Mukherjee, Arun B.
    Jean, Jiin-Shuh
    Arsenic-enriched groundwaters of India, Bangladesh and Taiwan-Comparison of hydrochemical characteristics and mobility constraints2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1163-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) enrichment in groundwater has become a major global environmental disaster. Groundwater samples were collected from 64 sites located in the districts of 24-Parganas (S), and Nadia in West Bengal, India (Bhagirathi sub-basin), and 51 sites located in the districts of Comilla, Noakhali, Magura, Brahman baria, Laxmipur, Munshiganj, Faridpur and Jhenaida in Bangladesh (Padma-Meghna sub-basin). Groundwater samples were also collected from two As-affected areas (Chianan and Lanyang plains) of Taiwan (n = 26). The concentrations of major solutes in groundwater of the Padma-Meghna sub-basin are more variable than the Bhagirathi sub-basin, suggesting variations in the depositional and hydrological settings. Arsenic concentrations in groundwaters of the studied areas showed large variations, with mean As concentrations of 125 mu g/L (range: 0.20 to 1,301 mu g/L) in Bhagirathi sub-basin, 145 mu g/L (range: 0.20 to 891 mu g/L) in Padma-Meghna sub-basin, 209 mu g/L (range: 1.3 to 575 mu g/L) in Chianan plain, and 102 mu g/L (range: 2.5 to 348 mu g/L) in Lanyang plain groundwater. The concentrations of Fe, and Mn are also highly variable, and are mostly above the WHO-recommended guideline values and local (Indian and Bangladeshi) drinking water standard. Piper plot shows that groundwaters of both Bhagirathi and Padma-Meghna sub-basins are of Ca-HCO(3) type. The Chianan plain groundwaters are of Na-Cl type, suggesting seawater intrusion, whereas Lanyang plain groundwaters are mostly of Na-HCO(3) type. The study shows that reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides is the dominant geochemical process releasing As from sediment to groundwater in all studied areas.

  • 50. Marino, T.
    et al.
    Boerrigter, M.
    Faccini, M.
    Chaumette, C.
    Arockiasamy, L.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Figoli, A.
    Photocatalytic activity and synthesis procedures of TiO2 nanoparticles for potential applications in membranes2017In: Application of Nanotechnology in Membranes for Water Treatment, CRC Press , 2017, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis based on oxide semiconductors is a promising technique for the prevention of microbial proliferation and to limit the growth of microorganisms. Among the studied photocatalysts, titanium dioxide (TiO2) represents one of the most interesting materials, due to its low cost, biocompatibility, chemical and thermal stability, and notable optical and dielectric properties. It exists in three polymorphic forms: rutile, which is the most stable form, anatase and brookite, both of which are metastable and convert into rutile upon heating. TiO2 nanoparticles can be efficiently obtained via different synthesis techniques, such as sol-gel, sol, hydrothermal, solvothermal, direct oxidation, chemical or physical vapor deposition, microwave, and reverse micelle methods, which offer the possibility to obtain well-controlled nanoparticle size and morphology. In the different TiO2 applications, its antimicrobial action has attracted a lot of attention in the last few decades. Particularly promising are the hybrid or mixed matrix TiO2- polymeric membranes, which allow separation and simultaneous photocatalytic reaction, without requiring any catalyst recovery operation. Several works have been published on the efficiency of the hybrid inorganic-organic membranes as antimicrobial systems, for bacteria, viruses, fungi and algae disruption. The TiO2 incorporation in/on the polymeric membrane also allows the reduction of fouling and at the same time highly improves water permeability and self-cleaning ability. 

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