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  • 1. Acs, Zoltan
    et al.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    The Entrepreneruship-Philanthropy Nexus: Implication for internationalization2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how Sweden and the United States have been impacted by philanthropicactivities, commercialization of university-based knowledge and internationalentrepreneurship. The analysis comprises a detailed case study of Swedish and U.S.universities, as well as a statistical analysis of the impact of philanthropy on economicgrowth. The results show that the United States has prompted a university system based oncompetition and variety, with an emphasis on philanthropy, promoting knowledge creation.International entrepreneurship has been an important mechanism by which this knowledge isglobalized leading to increased economic growth. Conversely, Swedish universities werecharacterized by less commercialized R&D and weak links to the commercial sector, rootedtraditionally in dependence on tax-financed and homogenous university structure. TheSwedish model has begun to change with important implications for development in smallerdomestic markets. The analysis has important implications for knowledge creation as asource of economic growth through international entrepreneurship taking advantage ofglobalization, especially for smaller countries.

  • 2. Acs, Zoltan J.
    et al.
    Audretsch, David B.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Carlsson, Bo
    Growth and entrepreneurship2012In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 289-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we suggest that the spillover of knowledge may not occur automatically as typically assumed in models of endogenous growth. Rather, a mechanism is required to serve as a conduit for the spillover and commercialization of knowledge from the source creating it, to the firms actually commercializing the new ideas. In this paper, entrepreneurship is identified as one such mechanism facilitating the spillover of knowledge. Using a panel of entrepreneurship data from 18 countries, we provide empirical evidence that, in addition to measures of Research & Development and human capital, entrepreneurial activity also serves to promote economic growth.

  • 3. Acs, Zoltan J.
    et al.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Economics.
    Audretsch, David B.
    Carlsson, Bo
    The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship2009In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary theories of entrepreneurship generally focus on the recognition of opportunities and the decision to exploit them. Although the entrepreneurship literature treats opportunities as exogenous, the prevailing theory of economic growth suggests they are endogenous. This paper advances the microeconomic foundations of endogenous growth theory by developing a knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship. Knowledge created endogenously results in knowledge spillovers, which allow entrepreneurs to identify and exploit opportunities.

  • 4. Acs, Zoltan J.
    et al.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Phillipe Aghion: recipient of the 2016 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research2016In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Philippe Aghion is the 2016 recipient of the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research, consisting of 100,000 Euros and a statuette designed by the internationally renowned Swedish sculptor Carl Milles. He is one of the most influential researchers worldwide in economics in the last couple of decades. His research has advanced our understanding of the relationship between firm-level innovation, entry and exit on the one hand, and productivity and growth on the other. Aghion has thus accomplished to bridge theoretical macroeconomic growth models with a more complete and consistent microeconomic setting. He is one of the founding fathers of the pioneering and original contribution referred to as Schumpeterian growth theory. Philippe Aghion has not only contributed with more sophisticated theoretical models, but also provided empirical evidence regarding the importance of entrepreneurial endeavours for societal prosperity, thereby initiating a more nuanced policy discussion concerning the interdependencies between entrepreneurship, competition, wealth and growth.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University and Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Thulin, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Creative Destruction and Productivity: Entrepreneurship by Type, Sector and Sequence2012In: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, ISSN 2045-2101, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 125-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Schumpeter claimed the entrepreneur to be instrumental for creative destruction and industrial dynamics. Entrepreneurial entry serves to transform and revitalize industries, thereby enhancing their competitiveness. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if entry of new firms influences productivity amongst incumbent firms, and the extent to which altered productivity can be attributed sector and time specific effects.

    Design/methodology/approach – Implementing a unique dataset the paper estimates a firm-level production function in which the productivity of incumbent firms is modeled as a function of firm attributes and regional entrepreneurship activity.

    Findings – The analysis finds support for positive productivity effects of entrepreneurship on incumbent firms, albeit the effect varies over time, what the authors refer to as a “delayed entry effect”. An immediate negative influence on productivity is followed by a positive effect several years after the initial entry. Moreover, the productivity of incumbent firms in services sectors appears to be more responsive to regional entrepreneurship, as compared to the productivity of manufacturing firms.

    Originality/value – The paper employs a firm-level production function approach allowing for time lags of the effect of entrepreneurship. The unique data implemented allow the authors to identify genuinely new ventures as compared to those associated with reorganizations of existing businesses, thereby overcoming much of data deficiencies in previous studies. In addition, data are distributed on Swedish functional labor market regions.

  • 6.
    Baltzopoulos, Apostolos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Economics.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Economics.
    Spin-offs: Firm, Regional and Industry DeterminationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7. Baltzopoulos, Apostolos
    et al.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Tikounides, Ioannis
    Spin-offs: Why geography matters2016In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 273--303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on unique data covering individuals, firms, industries and regions for the 1999–2005 period, we contribute with new knowledge concerning the impact of regional variables on spin-offs. Implementing a large number of controls, as well as different estimation techniques and robustness tests, we show that Jacobian externalities have a positive effect on spin-offs. Moreover, using an entropy measure to disentangle unrelated and related variety (RV), we conclude that the effect is confined to RV. These findings are likely to be associated with strong welfare effects: a standard deviation increase (decrease) in related (unrelated) variety increases spin-off propensity by approximately 25%. Other variables are shown to have economic effects of a similar magnitude but may have a different effect across sectors. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the impact of other determinants proposed in the literature (e.g., Marshallian externalities and scale effects) is too small to be detected.

  • 8. Birkinshaw, Julian M.
    et al.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Holm, Ulf
    Terjesen, Siri
    Why Do Some Multinational Corporations Relocate Their Headquarters Overseas?2006In: Strategic Management Journal, ISSN 0143-2095, E-ISSN 1097-0266, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 681-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the decision by a multinational corporation (MNC) to relocate its business unit and/or corporate HQ overseas. We argue that business unit HQs move overseas in response to changes in the internal configuration of their unit's activities and the demands of the product markets in which they operate, whereas corporate HQs move overseas in response to the demands of external stakeholders, in particular global financial markets and shareholders. Using data on 125 business unit HQs and 35 corporate HQs, we test and find support for these arguments. The research highlights important differences between corporate- and business-level strategy, and it suggests ways in which the theory of the MNC needs to be reconsidered.

  • 9.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Academic Entrepreneurship: Social norms, university culture and policies2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Is a shift in intellectual property rights to universities the key instrument in increasing com-mercialization of publicly funded research? How much can actually be learned from the U.S. system, disregarding the ongoing debate as to whether the U.S. do actually outperform Europe in terms of commercializing university based research? Taking Sweden as a role model I claim that this policy will not work. This allegation stems from the analysis of a unique data-base giving individual university researchers view on participation in commercialization of public research, their commercialization experiences, and the obstacles researchers claim exist to increase academic entrepreneurship. Despite researchers positive attitudes towards engag-ing in commercial activities, the university culture, weak incentive structures and badly man-aged support facilities impede the creation of efficient links to markets. I conclude that meas-ures must be taken at primarily the national level, but also at the university level, to enhance commercialization activities.

  • 10.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Economics (closed 20110301).
    Academic Entrepreneurship: Social norms, university culture and policies2007In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 619-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is a shift in intellectual property rights to universities the key instrument in increasing commercialization of publicly funded research? How much can actually be learned from the US system, disregarding the ongoing debate as to whether the USA do actually outperform Europe in terms of commercializing university-based research? Taking Sweden as a role model, the article claims that this policy will not work, from the analysis of a unique database giving individual university researchers' views on participation in commercialization of public research, their commercialization experiences, and the obstacles researchers say exist to increase academic entrepreneurship. Despite researchers' positive attitudes towards engaging in commercial activities, the university culture, weak incentive structures and badly managed support facilities impede the creation of efficient links to markets. Measures must be taken at primarily the national level, but also at the university level, to enhance commercialization activities

  • 11.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Behövs entreprenören?: Om deras betydelse för kunskapsutveckling, kommersialisering och tillväxt2007In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 19-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    De kreativa huvudkontoren2004In: Stockholm at Large, Färgfabriken , 2004Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13. Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    Den sista fracken inga fickor har2004Book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Entrepreneurs, Creative destruction and Production: Entry by type, sector and sequenceIn: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, ISSN 2045-2101, Vol. 1, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Economic Growth - past experience, current knowledge and policy implications2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable advances, even breakthroughs, have been made during the last decades in our understanding of the relationship between knowledge and growth on one hand, and entrepreneurship and growth on the other. Similarly, more profound insights have also been gained as to how entrepreneurship, innovation and knowledge are interrelated. Yet, a comprehensive understanding is still lacking concerning the interface of all of those variables: knowledge, innovation, entrepreneurship and growth. The link between the micro-economic origin of growth and the macro-economic outcome is still too rudimentary modeled to grasp the full width of these complex and intersecting forces. The main objective of this paper is hence to shed light on recent advances in our understanding of the forces that underpin the creation of knowledge, its diffusion and commercialization through innovation, and the role of the entrepreneur in the growth process. The policy implications of recent research findings conclude this survey. Particularly important policy implications refer to the design of regulation influencing knowledge production, ownership, entry barriers, labor mobility and (inefficient) financial markets. They all have implication for the efficient diffusion of knowledge through entry. Knowledge creation has to be matched by incentives that induce mechanisms to convert knowledge into societal and useful needs.

  • 16.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Economic growth: Interdependencies, irregularities and regularities2011In: Handbook of Innovation and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Audretsch, D, Falck, O and Heilbach, P, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 161-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Entrepreneurship, knowledge, and economic growth2008In: Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1551-3114, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 451-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge plays a critical role in economic development, still our understanding of how knowledge is created, diffused and converted into growth, is fragmented and partial. The neoclassical growth models disregarded the entrepreneur and viewed knowledge as an exogenous factor. Contemporary current knowledge-based growth models have re-introduced the notion of the entrepreneur, however stripped of its most typical characteristics, and the diffusion of knowledge is kept exogenous. It implies that the predictions and policy conclusions derived from these models may be flawed. This paper reviews the literature that addresses the issues of knowledge creation, knowledge diffusion and growth, and the role attributed the entrepreneur in such dynamic processes. I will explore how these insights can be integrated into existing growth models and suggest a more thorough microeconomic foundations from which empirically testable hypotheses can be derived.

  • 18.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Entrepreneurship, Knowledge and Economic Growth2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge plays a critical role in economic development, still our understanding of how knowledge is created, diffused and converted into growth, is fragmented and partial. The neoclassical growth models disregarded the entrepreneur and viewed knowledge as an exogenous factor. Contemporary current knowledge-based growth models have re-introduced the notion of the entrepreneur, however stripped of its most typical characteristics, and the diffusion of knowledge is kept exogenous. It implies that the predictions and policy conclusions derived from these models may be flawed. This paper reviews the literature that addresses the issues of knowledge creation, knowledge diffusion and growth, and the role attributed the entrepreneur in such dynamic processes. I will explore how these insights can be integrated into existing growth models and suggest a more thorough microeconomic foundations from which empirically testable hypotheses can be derived.

  • 19.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Entrepreneurship, Knowledge and Growth2008In: Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1551-3114, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 451-533Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Entrepreneurship, norms and the business cycle2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entreprenörerna är våra förändringsagenter2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Entreprenörskapsforum.
    Entreprenörskap, arbetsmarknad och arbetskraftsefterfrågan2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entreprenörskap i det 21 århundradet2017In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige 2012: Nationell GEM rapport2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige 2014: Nationell GEM rapport2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige 2015: Nationell GEM rapport2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige: Nationell GEM 20132013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Entreprenörskap, kommersialisering av kunskap och ekonomisk tillväxt (Entrepreneurship, commercialization and growth)2008In: Då förändrades Sverige (When Sweden changed) / [ed] Eric Giertz, Stockholm: Studentlitteratur , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Economics (closed 20110301).
    Globalisering och regional utveckling: betydelsen av entreprenörskap och innovation2010In: Bergslagen i globaliseringens tidevarv / [ed] Almquist, K och Gröning, L, Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30. Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    Heading for Headquarters?: Why and How the Location of Headquarters Matter among The EU-countries2004In: European Union and The Race for Foreign Direct Investment in Europe / [ed] P. Ghauri and L. Oxelheim, Elsevier, 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Innovation and Growth: A Technical or Entrepreneurial Residual?2012In: Innovation and Growth: From R&D Strategies of Innovating Firms to Economy-wide Technological Change / [ed] Martin Andersson, Börje Johansson, Charlie Karlsson, and Hans Lööf, Oxford University Press, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is increasingly viewed as the key to elevate prosperity and secure sustainable long-run growth. The last decades have witnessed a refinement of previous growth models to include also investments in education by individuals and R&D by firms. Better educated individuals and increased expenditure on R&D is then shown to result in innovations and accelerated growth. The issues discussed in this chapter refer to how innovative opportunities arise and are exploited, whether the normative conclusions of contemporary growth models are derived from a realistic micro-economic setting, and suggestions as to how these models can be improved in order to provide appropriate guidance for policy-makers. More precisely, there seems to be a missing link between the production of knowledge and its conversion to societal economic value. Whereas the neoclassical growth model attributed knowledge production to an exogenous 'technical residual', current knowledge based growth models assume the diffusion of to take place exogenously or can be attributed an 'entrepreneurial residual'.

  • 32.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Institutioner och incitament för innovation2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Knowledge Capital and Growth: The Emblematic Case of Sweden2005In: Research and Technological Innovation: The Challenge for a New Europe, Heidelberg: Physica-Verlag , 2005, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Knowledge Capital and the New Economy2000Book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Liberal policies for inclusive growth: A concluding note2014In: Intensive and inclusive growth in Europe / [ed] Gabriel Ehrling och Karl Wennberg, European liberal forum och Beril Ohlin institutet , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Madonna and the Music MiracleThe genesis and evolution of a globally competitive cluster2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue addressed in this paper concerns the emergence and dynamics of a regional cluster inthe music industry. Whereas mainstream economic geography models explain agglomeration ofexisting economic activities, an evolutionary approach is necessary to understand the emergenceof genuinely new clusters. Based on an empirical analysis of the major Swedish music cluster, itis shown how cognitive features, the institutional and organizational framework, as well aseconomic incentives, were interlinked in the process of cluster emergence. A multitude of forcesthus coincided in time and space to support the emerging music cluster. A latent knowledge base,language skill and path-dependence all played a significant role. It is also shown how mobile anddensely located agents, displaying a high degree of connectivity, together with external impulsesthrough immigrants, contributed to the dynamics and re-vitalization of the Stockholm musiccluster.

  • 37.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Mulrinational firms and the choice of foreign production or exports: The case of Sweden1998In: Wirtschaftspolitische Blätter, Vol. 6, p. 570-577Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    On the Role of Knowledge Capital in Firm Performance. Empirical Evidence From Swedish Firms in the Engineering Sector1997In: Revue d'Economie IndustrielleArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    On the role of knowledge capital in firm perfromance: Empirical evidence from Swedish firms in the engineering industry1997In: Revue d'Economie Industrielle, Vol. 81, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Regional Specialization and Universities: The new versus the old2008In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 253-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether there is a correspondence between a university's research specialization and industrial specialization in the region hosting the university, and to what extent universities influence regional productivity. Moreover, the analysis seeks to answer if a difference can be detected between the influences of old and new universities on regional performance. To achieve this end we utilize a unique data set on spatially disaggregated data for Sweden in the period 1975-99. A two-step Heckman regression analysis is implemented to examine whether universities' research specialization matches regional specialization in production as compared to the average region. The results suggest a correspondence in specialization, as well as positive productivity effects. However, there are also considerable differences across regions, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities.

  • 41.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    REGIONAL SPECIALIZATION AND UNIVERSITIES: THENEW VERSUS THE OLD2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the impact universities have on regional development and as to whether adifference can be detected between the influence of the old and new universities. To achievethis end a unique dataset on the researchers’ view regarding the universities role in commercialization,distinguishing between new universities (established around 1970) and old universities(established in the 15th and 17th century), is initially utilized. In the subsequent stagespatially disaggregated data is implemented in a two-step Heckman regression analysis to examinewhether a relationship exists between the universities research specialization and regionalproduction specialization 1975 to 1999. The results reveal that there are considerabledifferences across universities, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities. Finally,the impact of universities on regional productivity in knowledge-based industries is examined.

  • 42.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Economics (closed 20110301).
    Sanning och konsekvens av Stiglitz metoden. Replik till Åberg2005In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Specialization of Regions and Universities The New Versus the Old2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether there is a correspondence between a university’s research spe-cialization and industrial specialization in the region hosting the university, and to what extent universities influences regional productivity. Moreover, the analysis seeks to answer if a dif-ference can be detected between the influences of old and new universities on regional per-formance. To achieve this end we utilize a unique dataset on spatially disaggregated data for Sweden in the period 1975-1999. A two-step Heckman regression analysis is implemented to examine whether the universities research specialization match regional specialization in pro-duction as compared to the average region. The results suggest a correspondence in speciali-zation, as well as positive productivity effects. However, there are also considerable differ-ences across regions, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities.

  • 44.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Economics.
    Specialization of Regions and Universities: The New Versus the Old2008In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 253-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether there is a correspondence between a university's research specialization and industrial specialization in the region hosting the university, and to what extent universities influence regional productivity. Moreover, the analysis seeks to answer if a difference can be detected between the influences of old and new universities on regional performance. To achieve this end we utilize a unique data set on spatially disaggregated data for Sweden in the period 1975-99. A two-step Heckman regression analysis is implemented to examine whether universities' research specialization matches regional specialization in production as compared to the average region. The results suggest a correspondence in specialization, as well as positive productivity effects. However, there are also considerable differences across regions, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities.

  • 45.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sunk Costs, Firm Size and Internationalization1999In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    Svensk strukturomvandling från ett sysselsättningsperspektiv: myten om ett kunskapslyft2004In: Svensk utvecklingskraft / [ed] Karlsson, N och Johansson, D, Ratio förlag , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sverige behöver en allmän kompetensförsäkring2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Så bör personaloptioner beskattas2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    The entrepreneurial code: a comparative study of entrepreneurial dynamics in China, Europe and the U.S.2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The Genesis and Evolution of the Stockholm Music Cluster2009In: New Directions in Regional Economic Development, Springer, 2009, p. 385-408Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do superstars like and Bon Jovi, Britney Spears, Maddona and Ricky Martin, to an increasing extent choose Swedish composers and producers in an industry characterized by extremely fierce international competition? Bergen, Copenhagen, Dublin, London, Los Angeles, Manchester, New York, Paris and Seattle are some of the more prominent competitors to the Swedish – particularly Stockholm – music clusters. What triggered this evolution and which dynamic forces have been decisive in the creation of the Stockholm cluster? Despite the impressive research presented on spatial issues in the last decade, we know surprisingly little about the forces initiating the creation of clusters. Economic geography models originating in the international trade theory literature, view agglomeration as a function of linkages (pecuniary and non-pecuniary), trade costs and scale economies (Krugman 1991; Venables 1996; Fuijita et al. 1996; Braunerhjelm et al. 2000a,b). Still, the focus is rather on the re-location of already existing economic activities than the emergence of new clusters. New constellations of existing clusters that appear as altered trade costs (e.g. due to an integration process) induce a re-shuffling of firms and factors of production, leading to a new pattern of spatial distribution of economic activities. Notwithstanding that these models constitute a true contribution to our understanding of the spatial dimensions of economic activities. Empirical observations also suggest that clusters emerge for quite different reasons, such as exogenous shocks attributed to technological breakthroughs, locational specific factors, historically random events, deregulation, market structure and down-sizing of the government, or the disinvestment of a dominating firm (David 1985; Scott and Storper 1986; Arthur et al. 1987; Arthur 1989; Krugman 1991; Feldman and Francis 2002; Scott 2003; Braunerhjelm and Feldman 2006).

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