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  • 1.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Investigating the role of spatial ability as a factor of human intelligence in technology education: Towards a causal theory of the relationship between spatial ability and STEM education2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education is a particularly complex discipline due to the numerous variables which impact on teaching and learning. Due to the large effect of human intelligence on the variance in student educational achievement, there is a substantial need to further contemporary understandings of its role in education. Multiple paradigms exist regarding the study of human intelligence. One in particular, the psychometric tradition, has offered many critical findings which have had a substantial impact on STEM education. One of the most significant offerings of this approach is the wealth of empirical evidence which demonstrates the importance of spatial ability in STEM education. However, while categorically identified as important, a causal relationship between spatial ability and STEM is yet to be confirmed

    As there is insufficient evidence to support a causal investigation, this thesis aims to develop an empirically based causal theory to make this possible. Five studies were conducted to achieve this aim and are described in the appended papers. As the research explores spatial ability in technology education, Paper I examines the epistemological position of technology education within STEM education. Based on the evidence showing spatial ability is important in Science, Engineering and Mathematics, Paper II explores its relevance to Technology. Paper III offers an empirically based definition for spatial ability through a synthesis of contemporary research and illustrates empirically where it has been observed as important to STEM learning. Paper IV examines the perceived importance of spatial ability relative to intelligence in STEM education from the perspective of technology education. Finally, Paper V examines the psychometric relationship between spatial ability and fluid intelligence (Gf) based on a hypothesis generated throughout the preceding papers.

    The main results of this thesis illustrate the predictive capacity of visualization (Vz), memory span (MS), and inductive reasoning (I) on fluid intelligence (Gf) which is posited to offer a causal explanation based on the creative, innovative, and applied nature of STEM. Additional findings include the observation that learners use problem solving strategies which align with their cognitive strengths, that external representations of problems can scaffold the use of spatial ability or alleviate the need for it, that the variability of knowledge types across STEM sub-disciplines may affect the nature of reasoning within disciplines, and that for technology education specifically, acquiring an explicit knowledge base is not perceived to denote intelligence while the capacity to reason abstractly to solve novel problems is. This epistemological fluidity and focus on reasoning highlights the unique way in which technology education can provide insight into intelligence in STEM education. The implications of these results are discussed with specific focus on their theoretical validity and potential application in applied educational contexts.

  • 2.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Review: Design epistemology and curriculum planning2018In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 109-112Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Spatial ability and fluid intelligence2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Spatial working memory in mental rotations: A case for exploring neural efficiency and cognitive strategies2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    White, David
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Campbell, Mark
    University of Limerick.
    Spatial working memory and neural efficiency in mental rotations: An insight from pupillometry2018In: Engineering Design Graphics Journal, ISSN 1949-9167, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial ability, particularly the cognitive capacity for mental rotations, is a critical component of human cognition. Proficiency with mental rotation tasks is linked with educational performance in various Sci¬ence, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines, and with more general tasks such as real world wayfinding. Spatial working memory (SWM) is posited as a fundamental psychological con¬struct associated with mental rotation ability. Through the adoption of pupillometry, this study aspired to investigate the potential role of SWM within mental rotation performance. The results of this study unex¬pectedly illustrated that mental effort decreased as item difficulty increased. It is posited that learning may have occurred during the initial easier tasks facilitating an increased efficiency in cognitive processing associated with SWM storage during the more difficult mental rotations tasks.

  • 6.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Adaptive comparative judgement: A mechanism to enrich and enhance assessment practices to support teaching and learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    A comparison of Swedish and Irish secondary students’ conceptions of engineers and engineering using the Draw-an-Engineer Test2019In: 126th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Howley, Una
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    An exploratory study into the cognitive and behavioural influences on problem solving performance2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Engineering education research methods to determine conceptions of engineers and of engineering2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Investigating perceptions of intelligence as an approach to understanding female representation in technology and engineering education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    O'Connor, Adrian
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Implicit theories of intelligence in STEM education: Perspectives through the lens of technology education students2019In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 75-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The educational significance of eliciting students' implicit theories of intelligence is well established with the majority of this work focussing on theories regarding entity and incremental beliefs. However, a second paradigm exists in the prototypical nature of intelligence for which to view implicit theories. This study purports to instigate an investigation into students' beliefs concerning intellectual behaviours through the lens of prototypical definitions within STEM education. To achieve this, the methodology designed by Sternberg et al. (J Pers Soc Psychol 41(1):37-55, 1981) was adopted with surveys being administered to students of technology education requiring participants to describe characteristics of intelligent behaviour. A factor analytic approach including exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling was taken in analysing the data to determine the underlying constructs which the participants viewed as critical in their definition of intelligence. The findings of this study illustrate that students of technology education perceive intelligence to be multifaceted, comprising of three factors including social, general and technological competences. Implications for educational practice are discussed relative to these findings. While initially this study focuses on the domain of technology education, a mandate for further work in other disciplines is discussed.

  • 12.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    O'Neill, Colm
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology mediated assessment of dynamic spatial ability2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Phelan, Joseph
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Assessing visual perception in virtual reality environments2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    An investigation into problem solving approaches adopted during graphical reasoning episodes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Balancing curriculum intent with expected student responses to designerly tasks2018In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design activities form an extensive part of design and technology education with a link being posited within the pertinent literature between the cognitive activity of learning and the cognitive activity of design. It is therefore critical that design educators’ understand the effects that design constraints can have on the learning process. This paper aims to examine the potential to affect student responses and associated learning from design tasks based on the manipulation of task variables. A study was designed to examine the effects of two modelling systems – one parametric and one non-parametric – on the thought processes and design journeys of the students. The findings suggest that the use of parametric modelling can emphasis student thinking on technical considerations while the use of a freeform moulding CAD system affords a more creative orientation. Qualitative findings demonstrate the capacity of students to select appropriate strategies to complete the design task, further indicating that relaxing design constraints can support student learning in design activities. Considering curricular intentions to develop both technical and creative competencies, this study presents empirical findings illustrating how teachers can strategically design tasks which balance expected student responses with intended learning outcomes.

  • 16.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Framing spatial cognition: Establishing a research agenda2016In: ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division 70th Mid-Year Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The potential bifurcation of static and dynamic spatial cognitive processes2016In: ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division 71st Mid-Year Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    A heuristic framework of spatial ability: A review and synthesis of spatial factor literature to support its translation into STEM education2018In: Educational psychology review, ISSN 1040-726X, E-ISSN 1573-336X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 947-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An abundance of empirical evidence exists identifying a significant correlation between spatial ability and educational performance particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Despite this evidence, a causal explanation has yet to be identified. Pertinent research illustrates that spatial ability can be developed and that doing so has positive educational effects. However, contention exists within the relevant literature concerning the explicit definition for spatial ability. There is therefore a need to define spatial ability relative to empirical evidence which in this circumstance relates to its factor structure. Substantial empirical evidence supports the existence of unique spatial factors not represented in modern frameworks. Further understanding such factors can support the development of educational interventions to increase their efficacy and related effects in STEM education. It may also lead to the identification of why spatial ability has such a significant impact on STEM educational achievement as examining more factors in practice can help in deducing which are most important. In light of this, a synthesis of the spatial factors offered within existing frameworks with those suggested within contemporary studies is presented to guide further investigation and the translation of spatial ability research to further enhance learning in STEM education.

  • 19.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    An exploratory analysis into the relationships between spatial factors, domain-free general capacities and general fluid intelligence2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Examining the components of fluid intelligence: Implications for STEM education2018In: , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of TechnologyCo. WestmeathIreland.
    Canty, Donal
    Heuristics and CAD modelling: An examination of student behaviour during problem solving episodes within CAD modelling activities2017In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design activities typically involve and culminate in the creation of models representative of new ideas and conceptions. The format is often dictated by the specific discipline, with ideas in design and technology education regularly being externalised through the use of computer aided design (CAD). This paper focusses on the realisation stage of a design process, specifically when conceptual ideas are being externalised through CAD. Acknowledging students as novices or quasi-experts with regards to their levels of technical expertise and recognising the limitations in the cognitive capacities of humans suggests merit in investigating problem solving strategies through the lens of heuristics. A comparative study was employed between two distinct CAD systems to examine students modelling behaviour. Considering the situational context of the problems encountered and the bounded rationality which the students are operating within, a number of insights are generated from the findings which are of importance from a pedagogical perspective within design and technology education.

  • 22.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Insights from eye-tracking and pupillometry in design education research2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Athlone Institute of Technology, Westmeath, Ireland.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Investigating the use of spatial reasoning strategies in geometric problem solving2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 341-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A core aim of contemporary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is the development of robust problem-solving skills. This can be achieved by fostering both discipline knowledge expertise and general cognitive abilities associated with problem solving. One of the most important cognitive abilities in STEM education is spatial ability however understandings of how students use this ability in practice are currently underdeveloped. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how levels of spatial ability impacted both performance and approaches to problem solving. In the context of graphical education, selected due to its significant overlap with technological, mathematical and engineering knowledge, a repeated cross-sectional study design was implemented to gather longitudinal data of student approaches to problem solving. A battery of psychometric tests of spatial ability was administered to two cohorts and problem solving was examined through a variety of graphical problems. The findings illustrate a relationship between attaining higher levels of spatial ability and performance. Participants with lower levels of spatial ability evidenced the utilisation of models to a greater extend with a particular emphasis on models with the capacity to alleviate the need for spatial reasoning.

  • 24.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Spatial cognition in engineering education: Developing a spatial ability framework to support the translation of theory into practice2017In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial degree of empirical evidence has illustrated the correlation between spatial skills and performance in engineering education. This evidence has been foundational in the construction of educational interventions which have resulted in both increased levels of spatial ability and increased educational performance and retention. However, the cognitive faculty of spatial cognition is widely recognised as multifactorial and a number of factors exist within this domain which have not been examined as potential influences on educational success. A number of factors have been identified within the pertinent literature which do not appear in any formal framework of spatial cognition. This paper presents a review and synthesis of this work with the amalgam presented as a model to support the further integration of spatial ability into engineering educational practices.

  • 25.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    The importance and usefulness of comparative judgement for educational assessment2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    While comparative judgement has now been around for a number of years, it continues to be used in a variety of new ways and across multiple subjects. Jeffrey has specific experience using comparative judgement in design education which he will discuss as well as presenting other applications described in the literature. The intention of this presentation is to show both how comparative judgement works in practice for assessing students work, and also to demonstrate some of its other educational uses as well.

  • 26.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    The validity and reliability of online testing for the assessment of spatial ability2016In: ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division 71st Mid-Year Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    On intelligence in technology education: Towards redefining technological capability2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Technology subject in general post-primary education is unique based on its conception and treatment of knowledge. The task specific utility of knowledge is emphasised and at the same time, in reflection of the breadth of technology in society, the variance in the context of learning tasks can be quite large. The subject is considered to have a fluid epistemology which directly affects how capability is contextually defined. The concept of technological capability has been ascribed multiple definitions however the more commonly aligned with model suggests it refers to a synthesis of knowledge, skills, values and problem solving in a technological context. However the combination of knowledge, skills, values and problem solving neglects to acknowledge intelligence in the form of domain general abilities which have been observed to have a significant effect on student performance. Therefore this paper argues for the integration of contextually relevant domain general abilities with current conceptions of technological capability.

  • 28.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Visualization, inductive reasoning, and memory span as components of fluid intelligence: Implications for technology education2018In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 64-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Office of the President, Athlone Institute of Technology, Westmeath, Ireland.
    Power, Jason
    Michigan Technological University.
    Phelan, Joseph
    University of Limerick.
    The importance of supporting technological knowledge in post-primary education: A cohort study2018In: Research in Science and Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Substantial research highlights the differences between scientific and technological knowledge. Considering that learning is heavily focused on the acquisition of knowledge, it is important to examine the individual and systematic implications of these types of knowledge. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact on overall educational performance as a result of engaging with technology subjects at post-primary level. Sample: A five year cohort study was designed to gather longitudinal data from a total sample of 1761 pupils’ grades from the Irish Leaving Certificate examination. The sample was distributed across four schools. Design and methods: Grades from the Irish Leaving Certificate were selected because the examination is considered high stakes as it serves as the country’s primary mechanism for matriculation into third-level education. Individual examinations are designed externally to schools by a government body ensuring the validity of each examination in capturing the holistic interpretation subject syllabi. Finally, a points system is used to score each examination facilitating comparisons between subjects. Results: The results show that pupils who study the technology subjects are statistically significantly less likely to perform well overall in comparison to pupils who study science and mathematics subjects. They also show that for pupils who study the technology subjects, those subjects are statistically significantly likely to be their best performing subjects. Conclusions: Due to the array of variables impacting subject selection, a definitive causal explanation cannot be deduced from the data for these results. However, it is possible to infer that the variance in knowledge types between the science and technology subjects has an impact on the results. A case is made that a compulsory technological component should be incorporated into educational curricula to provide a comprehensive and general education and to facilitate the holistic development of pupils. 

  • 30.
    Canty, Donal
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Research paper on features of skills development in technology education2019Report (Other academic)
  • 31. Canty, Donal
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    O'Connor, Adrian
    Kelly, Matt
    The validity of digital badges as a currency for soft skill attainment2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Canty, Donal
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Inducting ITE students in assessment practices through the use of comparative judgement2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Agendas, influences, and capability: Perspectives on practice in design and technology education2017In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A philosophical shift in policy now situates the development of technological capability as the focus of Irish technology education. Internationally, the effectiveness of curricular reform in the discipline has previously been called to question, as the legacy of the preceding vocational craft subjects has been seen to throttle the evolution of practice in aligning with emergent policy. As Irish technology education shares this vocational heritage, this research seeks to explore the effectiveness of policy change through an investigation of current practices in the discipline. Specifically, this research seeks to explore the alignment of teachers’ perceptions of practice in terms of the focus of learning activities and educational outcomes as prescribed by curricula. A methodological framework was developed to explore teachers’ (n = 15) perceptions, ecologically rooted in the tasks and activities they use to teach in their classrooms. The results suggest a misalignment between what teachers conceive as important to the discipline, and their enacted practices. The paper unpacks the contentions surrounding this misalignment and discusses factors which appear to influence teachers’ perceptions, forming a greater understanding of what influences practice in the discipline.

  • 34.
    Dunbar, Ronan
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Curriculum development for technology teacher education: Integrating pedagogy, epistemology and capability2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Outcome analyses of educational interventions: a case study of the Swedish “Boost of Technology” intervention2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 739-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there have been multiple large scale interventions to support compulsory school teachers generally and within specific subjects. Due to the costs associated with such interventions it is critical that interim evaluation measures exist which can indicate potential success. Additionally, evaluation measures which can measure the actual impact of interventions relative to their intended aim are also needed as validation tools. The Swedish regional 'Tekniklyftet' or 'Boost of Technology' project which ran from 2011 to 2013 is presented here as a case study exploring evaluation measures for educational interventions in technology education. Three different evaluation approaches were used as measures of the intended outcomes of the intervention. These included (1) analysing the preconditions which exist in schools for teachers of Technology, (2) analysing the use of local long term technology education planning documents (school work plans) developed during the intervention, and (3) analysing the potential change over time in student performance in Technology based on national grades at the end of compulsory school. The findings gained from each approach indicate that the Boost of Technology project was a success. However, there were shortcomings associated with each approach. They are therefore discussed in the Swedish context with the intention to support future international stakeholders in the evaluation of interventions aspiring to develop technology education.

  • 36.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Arbeta med komparativ bedömning2018In: Skola och samhälle, E-ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Bedömningsexempel och sambedömning med hög reliabilitet (Worked Examples and Collaborative Assessment with High Reliability)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Hyland, Tomás
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gordon, Seamus
    The predictive capacity of spatial ability for knowledge retention in third level technology and engineering education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Hyland, Tomás
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gordon, Seamus
    Canty, Donal
    Assessing design activity in engineering education: A proposed synthesis of adaptive comparative judgement and the CDIO framework2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Hyland, Tomás
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gordon, Seamus
    University of Limerick.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Integrating assessment and design activity in engineering education: A proposed synthesis of adaptive comparative judgement and the CDIO framework2018In: Engineering Design Graphics Journal, ISSN 1949-9167, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the leading frameworks in engineering education specifically associated with design based competencies is the CDIO framework. This has been incorporated internationally into many institutions offering engineering education courses. Characterized by four unique stages, the CDIO framework affords an ideal scenario to incorporate a continuous assessment model. This paper presents a proposed synthesis between CDIO and Adaptive Comparative Judgement (ACJ). In particular, the opportunity to provide feedback through the ACJ system is theorized to have potentially positive educational effects. As part of a larger study, this approach is in the process of being refined prior to implementation as a pilot study for feasibility which will ultimately be succeeded by large-scale implementation to determine any potentially positive effect sizes.

  • 41.
    Hyland, Tomás
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Power, Jason
    Michigan Technological University.
    Gordon, Seamus
    Investigating the relationships between spatial ability, interest, and task experience on knowledge retention in engineering education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42. O'Connor, Adrian
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Identifying, developing and grading “soft skills” in higher education: A technological approach2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying, developing and grading soft skills, i.e., transversal cross-curricular competencies, in higher education requires the recognition of key qualities, the capacity to discriminate between these qualities and a mechanism to validly and reliability grade soft skill acquisition. This research proposes a technological infrastructure that acknowledges the importance of self-assessment, peer observation and teacher evaluation when adjudicating on subjective and often personal data. The proposal has the capacity to balance, weight and triangulate the objective and subjective evidence of soft skill acquisition ensuring the validity and reliability of the resultant accreditation. Accreditation of soft skills was in the form of digital badges. Using the proposed technological approach, the identification, development and grading of soft skills can be reviewed, tracked and managed over time to demonstrate competencies with respect to both the context and situation. The technological approach empowers stakeholders as critical partners within the assessment process and supports the ecological validity of their judgements based on the evidence submitted for accreditation. Reliability is strengthened by the triangulation of these judgements. Though more significantly, the technological approach facilitates the capacity to weight stakeholders’ decisions relative to the context and situation.

  • 43. Phelan, Joseph
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Canty, Donal
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    A proposed research agenda for investigating the nature of designerly thinking in action2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44. Power, Jason
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Visualizing success: Investigating the relationship between ability and self-efficacy in the domain of visual processing2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Power, Jason
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Canty, Donal
    Investigating the factor structure of pupils attitudes towards technology2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Reid, Clodagh
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Dunbar, Ronan
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    A preliminary model of problem categorisation to explore the cognitive abilities required for problem solving in engineering education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of engineering education as a means of enabling students to develop contemporarytransversal competencies such as problem solving, critical thinking, adaptive reasoning andcommunication, places a responsibility on curriculum designers to reposition these aptitudes within thehierarchy of desired skills. Problem solving is a fundamental attribute of each engineering discipline andplays a pivotal role in the work of an engineer. Problem solving is highlighted as a higher-ordercognitive task that engages actions and thoughts, which prompts this investigation of it through acognitive lens. With consideration of the range of abilities contributing to an individual’s generalcognitive ability, the likely cognitive abilities necessary for successful problem solving are explored andpositioned within the context of engineering education and the broader engineering profession. Theproblems faced by engineers differ through a variety of means. Problems can vary from well- to ill-defined, and through the requirement of reflective or active means to solve them. It is proposed that thecognitive abilities necessary to problem solve vary depending on these factors. A model is presentedwhich aims to support the identification of the cognitive abilities necessary for problem solving inconsideration of the nature of and approach taken to solving a problem. Through consideration of theseelements, the model aims to support engineering education and industrial training programs inaddressing the skills gaps that have emerged through the advancements of technology and society.

  • 47.
    Reid, Clodagh
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Dunbar, Ronan
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Developing a methodological approach to measure cognitive load during complex problem solving: Working to understand the role of spatial ability in problem solving2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Rowan, Neil
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Murray, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Blending immersive and educational technologies to inform sustainability and diversification of workforce training through machine interface learning using sterilization technologies as model – quo vadis?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Seery, Niall
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    The validity and reliability of adaptive comparative judgements in the assessment of graphical capability2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Seery, Niall
    et al.
    Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Bowe, Brian
    Carthy, Darren
    Spatial ability in education: A national study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 58
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