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  • 1.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hed, Yvonne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordberg, Axel
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bifunctional Dendrimers: From Robust Synthesis and Accelerated One-Pot Postfunctionalization Strategy to Potential Applications2009In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 2126-2130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hed, Yvonne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordberg, Axel
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    One-pot dendritic growth and post-functionalization of multifunctional dendrimers: Synthesis and application2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vamvounis, George
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Andreas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Europium confined cyclen dendrimers with photophysically active triazoles2008In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 18, no 22, p. 2545-2554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dendrimers up to the fourth generation (G1-G4) were successfully synthesized via the efficient copper catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between primary alkynes and azides (CuAAC), also referred to as a click reaction. The synthetic protocol involved the preparation of presynthesized dendron wedges that subsequently were attached to a tetra-valent alkyne functional cyclen core. These constructed structures integrated stable triazole groups "intra-locked'' between the cyclen and dendron wedges. The incorporation of a lanthanide metal ion, europium, into the interior of all cyclen dendrimers was monitored by FT-IR. Interestingly, the photophysical results showed that the proximate triazole not only acts as a stable linker but also as a sensitizers, transferring its singlet-singlet excitation in the ultraviolet region (270-290 nm) to the partially filled luminescent lanthanide 4f shell. An increase of luminescence decay time from the lanthanide D-5(0) -> F-7(2) emission was observed with increasing dendrimer size, indicating that the shielding effect of the dendron wedges is important for the relaxation of the photo-excitation and energy transfer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a set of dendron wedges have successfully been attached to a cyclen metal ion cage via the versatile click reaction. Furthermore, the produced triazoles intra-locked in close proximity to the macrocycle core elucidated an interesting photophysical function.

  • 4.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hawker, Craig
    Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Mat Res Lab.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A chemoselective approach for the accelerated synthesis of well-defined dendritic architectures2007In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, no 22, p. 2249-2251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A chemoselective and layered growth approach has been developed for the synthesis of dendrimers, combining Click chemistry with traditional esterification/etherification reactions, without the need for activation steps and with excellent overall yields.

  • 5.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Ropponen, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Lundberg, Pontus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Click chemistry as a tool for accelerated and one-pot synthesis of dendrimers: thermal study and application2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dendrons, dendrimers and linear polymers have been synthesized using click chemistry in combination with anhydride chemistry and atom transfer radical polymerization, ATRP. Functional materials were obtained in multigram scale using these orthogonal chemistries simultaneous.

  • 6.
    Bergenudd, Helena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Heterogeneous iron(II)-chloride mediated radical polymerization of styrene2009In: Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, ISSN 1381-1169, E-ISSN 1873-314X, Vol. 306, no 1-2, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to perform atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with a more environmentally friendly mediator, polymerization of styrene in the presence of iron(II)-chloride and EDTA was explored from a mechanistic point of view. The presence of EDTA, which normally can form a complex with FeCl2, had no influence on the polymerization results as both the mediator and EDTA were insoluble in the polymerization medium. A mechanism is suggested for the heterogeneous polymerization of styrene mediated by iron (II)-chloride in p-xylene at 50 °C. Varying the mediator amount more than 10-fold revealed that the rate limiting step at low mediator amounts was the adsorption of the initiator or dormant polymer to the mediator surface, whereas at higher mediator amounts, the rate limiting step was instead the activation step in the ATRP equilibrium. The mechanism changed to free radical polymerization in solution at a certain conversion, resulting in lower apparent rate constant and an increased amount of transfer and termination reactions. Chain extension with MMA showed that a significant proportion of the polymer chain ends were active also at high conversions.

  • 7. Chen, Gaojian
    et al.
    Tao, Lei
    Mantovani, Giuseppe
    Geng, J.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Haddleton, David M.
    A modular click approach to glycosylated polymeric beads: Design, synthesis and preliminary lectin, recognition studies2007In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 40, no 21, p. 7513-7520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Covalent immobilization of a range of carbohydrate derivatives onto polymeric resin beads is described. Copper-catalyzed Huisgen [2 + 3] cycloaddition (often termed click chemistry) was used to graft mannose-containing azides to complementarily functionalized alkyne surfaces, namely (a) Wang resin or (b) Rasta particles consisting of a clickable alkyne polymer loose outer shell and a Wang resin inner core. For the second approach, Wang resin beads were first converted into immobilized living radical polymerization initiators with subsequent polymerization of trimethylsilanyl-protected propargyl methacrylate followed by deprotection with TBAF to yield the desired polyalkyne clickable scaffold. The appropriate (x-mannopyranoside azide was then clicked onto the bead to give a mannose functionalized Rasta resin. IR, gel-phase H-1 NMR, and elemental analysis have been used to characterize the modified resins. The binding abilities of these D-mannose-modified particles were subsequently tested using fluorescein-labeled Concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that binds certain mannose-containing molecules. Preliminary results indicated that the novel glyco-hybrid materials presented in this work are able to efficiently recognize mannose-binding model lectins such as Con A, opening the way for their potential application in affinity chromatography, sensors, and other protein recognition/separation fields.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordin, Ove
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 425-Surface modification of thermally expandable microspheres by (ARGET) ATRP2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordin, Ove
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Surface modification of thermally expandable microspheres by grafting poly(glycidyl methacrylate) using ARGET ATRP2009In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 2374-2382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study demonstrates the surface modification of thermally expandable core/shell microspheres by grafting glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) using activators regenerated by electron transfer (ARGET) ATRP. To retain the expansion properties it was essential to minimize the shear forces, use solvents compatible with the microspheres and keep the reaction times short (three hours or less). Using microspheres with hydroxyl groups on the surface, it was found that after converting these to α-bromo esters, GMA could be grafted by ARGET ATRP using only 50 ppm of copper catalyst in toluene at 30 °C. Decent control of the polymerization was achieved with PMDETA as ligand reaching PDIs of 1.4 for the solution polymerization of GMA. When microspheres were present, the polymerization was less controlled with higher PDIs. The epoxide groups of the grafted microspheres were hydrolyzed by HCl in THF providing a hydrophilic surface of the microsphere. The expansion property of the microspheres was studied after each reaction step by thermal mechanical analysis, and it was found that the expansion capacity was well preserved with only limited negative effect on the microspheres.

  • 10.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kinetic Study of the Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization from Bio-Fiber SurfacesIn: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Intelligent Dual-Responsive Cellulose Surfaces via Surface-Initiated ATRP2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 2139-2145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel thermo-responsive cellulose (filter paper) surfaces of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and pH-responsive cellulose surfaces of 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) have been achieved via surface-initiated ATRP. Dual-responsive (pH and temperature) cellulose surfaces were also obtained through the synthesis of block-copolymer brushes of PNIPAAm and P4VP. With changes in pH and temperature, these "intelligent" surfaces showed a reversible response to both individual triggers, as indicated by the changes in wettability from highly hydrophilic to highly hydrophobic observed by water contact angle measurements. Adjusting the composition of the grafted block-copolymer brushes allowed for further tuning of the wettability of these "intelligent" cellulose surfaces.

  • 12.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Dual-Responsive Bio-Fiber Surfaces via ATRPIn: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, J.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    ATRP as a tool to obtain functional surface modifications on bio-fiber surfaces. Dual responsive grafts2007In: Polymer Preprints, ISSN 0032-3934, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 173-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hansson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 500-Surface properties of cellulose readily tailored by ATRP2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Nyström, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Unal, Kerem
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vamvounis, George
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hawker, Craig
    Wooley, Karen
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Characterization of Poly(norbornene) Dendronized Polymers Prepared by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization of Dendron Bearing Monomers2006In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 39, no 21, p. 7241-7249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation and characterization of a series of first to fourth generation dendronized poly-(norbornene)s are presented. The monomers were synthesized in a divergent fashion from 5-norbornene-2-methanol, utilizing the acetonide protected anhydride of 2,2-bis(methylol)propionic acid. The norbornenyl bearing dendrons were polymerized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, and it was found that the Grubbs' first generation catalyst resulted in polymers with lower polydispersity compared to the materials obtained when employing the second generation catalyst. Two series of first to fourth generation polymers were characterized by DSC, SEC, and dynamic rheological measurements. In addition, it was found that the fourth generation material could form regular, porous membranes and birefringent fibers. The membranes were characterized with atomic force and optical microscopy. The birefringent fibers were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, polarized FTIR, and polarized optical microscopy.

  • 16.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    From Responsive Interfaces to Honeycomb Membranes by Controlled Radical Polymerisation2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, surface modification of both organic and inorganic substrates (in terms of cellulose and silica nanoparticles, respectively) has been explored using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP).

    The desire to modify bio-based materials to fit into new application areas and the need for bio-based materials with improved material properties is steadily increasing due to environmental concern.

    Superhydrophobic and self-cleaning cellulose surfaces were fabricated by combining ATRP with post-functionalisation. Glycidyl methacrylate was grafted from filter paper, and the epoxide groups were used as reactive handles to create a branched “graft-on-graft” architecture. Post-functionalisation of this architecture with perfluorinated chains or alkyl chains resulted in the formation of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Grafting of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) from filter paper yielded cellulose surfaces capable of switching the wettability, from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, in response to changes in temperature. The wettability of cellulose surfaces grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) could be adjusted from hydrophilic to hydrophobic by changing pH. Furthermore, cellulose surfaces responding to changes in both pH and temperature were obtained via grafting of block copolymers of PNIPAAm and P4VP.

    The use of inorganic nano-particles in composites has attracted considerable academic and industrial interest due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. Styrene was grafted from the surface of silica nanoparticles using ATRP. The resulting organic-inorganic hybrid materials did not aggregate to the same extent as the un-modified silica particles.

    The polystyrene-modified silica particles were used for the fabrication of honeycomb membranes. It was evident that the pore sizes and the number of porous layers could be tuned by varying the conditions used for film casting. To broaden the range of polymers available for film casting into honeycomb membranes, a block copolymer of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) was grafted from silica nanoparticles. Polymer-blends of polystyrene-modified particles and poly(9,9´-dihexylfluorene) (PDHF) were also used as an alternative to incorporate functionality into honeycomb membranes.

  • 17.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Holdcroft, Steven
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vamvounis, George
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Solution-processed superhydrophobic conjugated polymer films2012In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 8, no 21, p. 5753-5755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interfacial properties of solution-processed conjugated polymer films are investigated. Their surface roughness was controlled by varying the humidity during the film deposition and mechanical exfoliation. A superhydrophobic film was obtained from a rough film of a partially fluorinated conjugated polymer. These films would be beneficial towards robust organic electronic devices.

  • 18.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats K. G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Whittaker, Michael
    Chemistry Department, University of Queensland.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Highly-ordered hybrid organic-inorganic isoporous membranes from polymer modified nanoparticles2005In: Macromolecular rapid communications, ISSN 1022-1336, E-ISSN 1521-3927, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 524-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials consisting of nanosized silica particles with surface grafted PS or PS-b-PMMA were synthesized using ATRP. These hybrid materials were used in the fabrication of highly-ordered isoporous membranes. Optical characterization revealed that the membranes consisted of hexagonally ordered pores of uniform size. The combination of an open pore structure and high surface area makes isoporous membranes into materials of high interest in fields as biotechnology and photonics.

  • 19.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordqvist, David
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Honeycomb Patterned Membranes from Polymer Modified Silica NanoparticlesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, J.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Superhydrohobic bio-fibre surfaces obtained via ATRP and postfunctioalizations reactions2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bouncing Water Droplets on Superhydrophobic Cellulose SurfacesIn: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Superhydrophobic and self-cleaning bio-fiber surfaces via ATRP and subsequent postfunctionalization2009In: ACS applied materials & interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 816-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superhydrophobic and self-cleaning cellulose surfaces have been obtained via surface-confined grafting of glycidyl methacrylate using atom transfer radical polymerization combined with postmodification reactions. Both linear and branched graft-on-graft architectures were used for the postmodification reactions to obtain highly hydrophobic bio-fiber surfaces by functionalization of the grafts with either poly(dimethylsiloxane), perfluorinated chains, or alkyl chains, respectively, Postfunctionalization using alkyl chains yielded results similar to those of surfaces modified by perfluorination, in terms of superhydrophobicity, self-cleaning properties, and the stability of these properties over time. in addition, highly oleophobic surfaces have been obtained when modification with perfluorinated chains was performed.

  • 23.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Östmark, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Superhydrophobic Bio-fibre Surfaces via Tailored Grafting Architecture2006In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, no 34, p. 3594-3596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superhydrophobic bio-fibre surfaces with a micro-nano-binary surface structure have been achieved via the surface-confined grafting of glycidyl methacrylate, using a branched "graft-on-graft'' architecture, followed by post-functionalisation to obtain fluorinated brushes.

  • 24.
    Nyström, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Blakey, Idriss
    Boyer, Cyrille
    Davis, Thomas P.
    Whittaker, Michael R.
    Biomimetic Surface Modification of Honeycomb Films via a "Grafting From" Approach2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 15, p. 12748-12754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobic isoporous membranes were fabricated using the "breath figure" method from polystyrene stars synthesized via ATRP. The living polymer chain ends at the surface of the films were then used, without further modification, in a "grafting-from" approach to grow surface-linked polyglycidyl methacrylate chains under conditions that maintained the regular honeycomb structure. This versatile functional surface was then used as a platform to build a small library of surfaces using a variety of simple chemistries: (i) the acid hydrolysis of the epoxide to form bis-alcohol groups and (ii) utilizing the "click-like" epoxide-amine reaction to functionalize the surface with a model biomolecule-(biotinamido)pentylamine. The successful modifications were confirmed by a combination of spectroscopic and biological means. Changes in the growth characteristics of nonmotile Psychrobacter sp. strain, SW5, on the honeycomb films, provided further evidence confirming changes in the hydrophobicity of the surface upon grafting.

  • 25.
    Vamvounis, George
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nystrom, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Formation and properties of isoporous films composed of polymer semiconductors2006In: Optical Materials in Defence Systems Technology III / [ed] rote, JG; Kajzar, F; Lindgren, M, BELLINGHAM, WA: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING , 2006, Vol. 6401, p. U64-U70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ordered hexagonal arrays of isoporous films prepared from poly(9,9'-dihexylfluorene) and polystyrene grafted silica nanoparticles (Si-graft-PS) are presented. These close packed arrays were formed in areas of many square millimeters. The pore size varied from 2.9 - 8.5 mu m, depending on the concentration of Si-graft-PS and the processing conditions. Solid state photoluminescence resulted in a significant red shift of up to 30 nm in these films compared to conventional processing techniques. These differences are attributed to induced aggregation of the polymers caused by polymer- solvent interactions. Interfacial properties were investigated, and it was found that hydrophobic surfaces (contact angles of up to 129 degrees) were prepared because of high surface roughness. These ordered porous polymer films may find use in microelectronic and bio- and/or chemical sensor applications.

  • 26.
    Vamvounis, George
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
    Holdcroft, Steven
    Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Self-assembly of poly(9,9 '-dihexylfluorene) to form highly ordered isoporous films via blending2006In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 3959-3961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly ordered hexagonal arrays of isoporous films prepared from poly(9,9'-dihexylfluorene) and polystyrene-grafted silica nanoparticles (Si-graft-PS) are presented. These close-packed arrays were formed in areas of many square millimeters. The pore size varied from 3.6 to 8.5 mu m, depending on the concentration of Si-graft-PS and the processing conditions. Solid-state photoluminescence resulted in a significant red shift of up to 30 nm in these films compared to that in conventional processing techniques. These differences are attributed to enhanced aggregation of the polymers caused by polymer-solvent interactions. These highly ordered polymer films may find use in microelectronic and biological and/or chemical sensor applications.

  • 27.
    Östmark, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Dendronized Hydroxypropyl Cellulose: Synthesis and Characterization of Biobased Nanoobjects2007In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 3815-3822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dendronized polymers containing a cellulose backbone have been synthesized with the aim of producing complex molecules with versatile functionalization possibilites and high molecular weight from biobased starting materials. The dendronized polymers were built by attaching premade acetonide-protected 2,2-bis(methylol)propionic acid functional dendrons of generation one to three to a hydroxypropyl cellulose backbone. Deprotection or functionalization of the end groups of the first generation dendronized polymer to hydroxyl groups and long alkyl chains was performed, respectively. The chemical structures of the dendronized polymers were confirmed through analysis using H-1 NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. From SEC analysis, the dendronized polymers were found to have an increasing polystyrene-equivalent molecular weight up to the second generation (M-n = 50 kg mol(-1)), whereas the polystyrene-equivalent molecular weight for the third generation was lower than for the second, although the same grafting density was obtained from H-1 NMR spectroscopy for the second and third generations. Tapping-mode atomic force microscopy was used to characterize the properties of the dendronized polymers in the dry state, exploring both the effect of the polar substrate mica and the less polar substrate highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). It was found that the molecules were in the size range of tens of nanometers and that they were apt to undertake a more elongated conformation on the HOPG surfaces when long alkyl chains were attached as the dendron end-groups.

  • 28.
    Östmark, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 73-Hydroxypropyl cellulose as multifunctional initiator for controlled polymerizations2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Östmark, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Unimolecular Nanocontainers Prepared by ROP and Subsequent ATRP from Hydroxypropylcellulose2008In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 4405-4415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) is used as a macroinitiator for ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone for the synthesis of a high molecular weight comb polymer consisting of a cellulose backbone and PCL grafts. The PCL end groups are converted into initiating sites for ATRP and chain extension of the PCL block is performed through grafting of tert-butyl acrylate to different lengths. The comb block copolymers are thereafter converted to amphiphilic polymers through deprotection of the tert-butyl group by acidic treatment, resulting in PCL-block-PAA grafts. These block copolymers are suspended in water and cross-linked using a water-soluble diamine to different attempted cross-link densities. Initial studies of the solubilization and encapsulation capacities of the amphiphilic polymers are performed using the hydrophobic model compound pyrene.

1 - 29 of 29
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