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  • 1. Abrahamsson, T. R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, H. E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björkstén, B.
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jenmalm, M. C.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age. Objective To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema. Methods The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1week, 1month and 12months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). Results Children developing asthma (n=8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1week (P=0.04) and 1month (P=0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n=13), eczema (n=12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n=14) at 7years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 2. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role? Reply2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 248-249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 434-U244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development. METHODS: Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). RESULTS: Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P= .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P= .02 and P= .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P= .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R edgeR test: P= .008, q= 0.02). CONCLUSION: Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 4. Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Logue, Jürg Brendan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bruchert, Volker
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Mineral Type Structures Soil Microbial Communities2017In: Geomicrobiology Journal, ISSN 0149-0451, E-ISSN 1521-0529, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 538-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil microorganisms living in close contact with minerals play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of elements, soil formation, and plant nutrition. Yet, the composition of microbial communities inhabiting the mineralosphere (i.e., the soil surrounding minerals) is poorly understood. Here, we explored the composition of soil microbial communities associated with different types of minerals in various soil horizons. To this effect, a field experiment was set up in which mineral specimens of apatite, biotite, and oligoclase were buried in the organic, eluvial, and upper illuvial horizons of a podzol soil. After an incubation period of two years, the soil attached to the mineral surfaces was collected, and microbial communities were analyzed by means of Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the 16S (prokaryotic) and 18S (eukaryotic) ribosomal RNA genes. We found that both composition and diversity of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities varied across the different mineral surfaces, and that mineral type had a greater influence on structuring microbial assemblages than soil horizon. Thus, our findings emphasize the importance of mineral surfaces as ecological niches in soils.

  • 5.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Bennke, Christin
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Beier, Sara
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Jürgens, Klaus
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Ekman, Martin
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University Science for Life Laboratory, Solna, Sweden.
    Ininbergs, Karolina
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University Science for Life Laboratory, Solna, Sweden.
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Recovering 2,032 Baltic Sea microbial genomes by optimized metagenomic binningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquatic microorganism are key drivers of global biogeochemical cycles and form the basis of aquatic food webs. However, there is still much left to be learned about these organisms and their interaction within specific environments, such as the Baltic Sea. Crucial information for such an understanding can be found within the genome sequences of organisms within the microbial community.

    In this study, the previous set of Baltic Sea clusters, constructed by Hugert et al., is greatly expanded using a large set of metagenomic samples, spanning the environmental gradients of the Baltic Sea. In total, 124 samples were individually assembled and binned to obtain 2,032 Metagenome Assembled Genomes (MAGs), clustered into 353 prokaryotic and 14 eukaryotic species- level clusters. The prokaryotic genomes were widely distributed over the prokaryotic tree of life, representing 20 different phyla, while the eukaryotic genomes were mostly limited to the division of Chlorophyta. The large number of reconstructed genomes allowed us to identify key factors determining the quality of the genome reconstructions.

    The Baltic Sea is heavily influenced of human activities of which we might not see the full implications. The genomes reported within this study will greatly aid further studies in our strive for an understanding of the Baltic Sea microbial ecosystem.

  • 6.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bjarnason, Brynjar Smári
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    de Bruijn, Ino
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences (BILS), Sweden.
    Schirmer, Melanie
    Quick, Joshua
    Ijaz, Umer Z.
    Lahti, Leo
    Loman, Nicholas J.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Quince, Christopher
    Binning metagenomic contigs by coverage and composition2014In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 1144-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shotgun sequencing enables the reconstruction of genomes from complex microbial communities, but because assembly does not reconstruct entire genomes, it is necessary to bin genome fragments. Here we present CONCOCT, a new algorithm that combines sequence composition and coverage across multiple samples, to automatically cluster contigs into genomes. We demonstrate high recall and precision on artificial as well as real human gut metagenome data sets.

  • 7.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karlsson, Christofer M.G.
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, EEMiS, Linnaeus University, Barlastgatan 11, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Divne, Anna-Maria
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Bergin, Claudia
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Homa, Felix
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Lindh, Markus V.
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, EEMiS, Linnaeus University, Barlastgatan 11, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Molecular, Tumour and Cell Biology, Centre for Translational Microbiome Research, Solna, Sweden.
    Ettema, Thijs JG
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, EEMiS, Linnaeus University, Barlastgatan 11, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Genomes from uncultivated prokaryotes: a comparison of metagenome-assembled and single-amplified genomesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prokaryotes dominate the biosphere and regulate biogeochemical processes essential to all life. Yet, our knowledge about their biology is for the most part limited to the minority that has been successfully cultured. Molecular techniques now allow for obtaining genome sequences of uncultivated prokaryotic taxa, facilitating in-depth analyses that may ultimately improve our understanding of these key organisms.

    Results: We compared results from two culture-independent strategies for recovering bacterial genomes: single-amplified genomes and metagenome-assembled genomes. Single-amplified genomes were obtained from samples collected at an offshore station in the Baltic Sea Proper and compared to previously obtained metagenome-assembled genomes from a time series at the same station. Among 16 single-amplified genomes analyzed, seven were found to match metagenome-assembled genomes, affiliated with a diverse set of taxa. Notably, genome pairs between the two approaches were nearly identical (>98.7% identity) across overlapping regions (30-80% of each genome). Within matching pairs, the single-amplified genomes were consistently smaller and less complete, whereas the genetic functional profiles were maintained. For the metagenome-assembled genomes, only on average 3.6% of the bases were estimated to be missing from the genomes due to wrongly binned contigs; the metagenome assembly was found to cause incompleteness to a higher degree than the binning procedure.

    Conclusions: The strong agreement between the single-amplified and metagenome-assembled genomes emphasizes that both methods generate accurate genome information from uncultivated bacteria. Importantly, this implies that the research questions and the available resources are allowed to determine the selection of genomics approach for microbiome studies.

  • 8.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundh, John
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Solna, Sweden.
    Bennke, Christin
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Beier, Sara
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hugerth, Luisa
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Kisand, Veljo
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Riemann, Lasse
    Section for Marine Biological Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Helsingør, Denmark.
    Jürgens, Klaus
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    BARM and BalticMicrobeDB, a reference metagenome and interface to meta-omic data for the Baltic SeaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is one of the world’s largest brackish water bodies and is characterised by pronounced physicochemical gradients where microbes are the main biogeochemical catalysts. Meta-omic methods provide rich information on the composition of, and activities within microbial ecosystems, but are computationally heavy to perform. We here present the BAltic Sea Reference Metagenome (BARM), complete with annotated genes to facilitate further studies with much less computational effort. The assembly is constructed using 2.6 billion metagenomic reads from 81 water samples, spanning both spatial and temporal dimensions, and contains 6.8 million genes that have been annotated for function and taxonomy. The assembly is useful as a reference, facilitating taxonomic and functional annotation of additional samples by simply mapping their reads against the assembly. This capability is demonstrated by the successful mapping and annotation of 24 external samples. In addition, we present a public web interface, BalticMicrobeDB, for interactive exploratory analysis of the dataset.

  • 9.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundh, John
    Stockholm Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Biochem & Biophys, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Bennke, Christin
    Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res Warnemunde, D-18119 Rostock, Germany..
    Beier, Sara
    Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res Warnemunde, D-18119 Rostock, Germany..
    Lundin, Daniel
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KKarolinska Inst, Dept Mol Tumor & Cell Biol, Ctr Translat Microbiome Res, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Kisand, Veljo
    Univ Tartu, Inst Technol, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Riemann, Lasse
    Univ Copenhagen, Sect Marine Biol Sect, Dept Biol, DK-3000 Helsingor, Denmark..
    Juergens, Klaus
    Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res Warnemunde, D-18119 Rostock, Germany..
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res Warnemunde, D-18119 Rostock, Germany..
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    BARM and BalticMicrobeDB, a reference metagenome and interface to meta-omic data for the Baltic Sea2018In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, article id 180146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is one of the world's largest brackish water bodies and is characterised by pronounced physicochemical gradients where microbes are the main biogeochemical catalysts. Meta-omic methods provide rich information on the composition of, and activities within, microbial ecosystems, but are computationally heavy to perform. We here present the Baltic Sea Reference Metagenome (BARM), complete with annotated genes to facilitate further studies with much less computational effort. The assembly is constructed using 2.6 billion metagenomic reads from 81 water samples, spanning both spatial and temporal dimensions, and contains 6.8 million genes that have been annotated for function and taxonomy. The assembly is useful as a reference, facilitating taxonomic and functional annotation of additional samples by simply mapping their reads against the assembly. This capability is demonstrated by the successful mapping and annotation of 24 external samples. In addition, we present a public web interface, BalticMicrobeDB, for interactive exploratory analysis of the dataset. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 10. Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Andersson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Genet.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    High archaeal diversity in Antarctic circumpolar deep waters2011In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 689-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaea are abundant in polar oceans but important ecological aspects of this group remain enigmatic, such as patterns of diversity and biogeography. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing population study of Antarctic archaea based on 198 bp fragments of the 16S rRNA gene, targeting different water masses across the Amundsen and Ross Seas. Our results suggest that archaeal commu- nity composition is strongly shaped by hydrography and significantly influenced by environmental param- eters. Archaeal communities from cold continental shelf waters (SW) of the Ross Sea were similar over depth with a single thaumarchaeal phylotype domi- nating Antarctic surface waters (AASW) and deeper SW (contributing up to 80% of reads). However, this phylotype contributed less than 8% of reads in cir- cumpolar deep waters (CDW). A related thaumar- chaeon (98% identity) was almost absent in AASW, but contributed up to 30% of reads in CDW, suggest- ing ecological differentiation of closely related phylo- types. Significantly higher archaeal richness and evenness were observed in CDW, with Shannon indices (c. 2.5) twice as high as for AASW, and high contributions of Group II Euryarchaeota. Based on these results, we suggest that CDW is a hotspot of archaeal diversity and may play an important role in the dispersal of archaeal phylotypes to other oceanic water masses.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Microarray-based investigation of genome and transcriptome organisation in the archaeon sulfolobus2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Departments of Earth and Planetary Science and Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley.
    Banfield, J. F.
    Virus population dynamics and acquired virus resistance in natural microbial communities2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 320, no 5879, p. 1047-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viruses shape microbial community structure and function by altering the fitness of their hosts and by promoting genetic exchange. The complexity of most natural ecosystems has precluded detailed studies of virus-host interactions. We reconstructed virus and host bacterial and archaeal genome sequences from community genomic data from two natural acidophilic biofilms. Viruses were matched to their hosts by analyzing spacer sequences that occur among clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) that are a hallmark of virus resistance. Virus population genomic analyses provided evidence that extensive recombination shuffles sequence motifs sufficiently to evade CRISPR spacers. Only the most recently acquired spacers match coexisting viruses, which suggests that community stability is achieved by rapid but compensatory shifts in host resistance levels and virus population structure.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bernander, R.
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Dual-genome primer design for construction of DNA microarrays2005In: Bioinformatics, ISSN 1367-4803, E-ISSN 1367-4811, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 325-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation: Microarray experiments using probes covering a whole transcriptome are expensive to initiate, and a major part of the costs derives from synthesizing gene-specific PCR primers or hybridization probes. The high costs may force researchers to limit their studies to a single organism, although comparing gene expression in different species would yield valuable information. Results: We have developed a method, implemented in the software DualPrime, that reduces the number of primers required to amplify the genes of two different genomes. The software identifies regions of high sequence similarity, and from these regions selects PCR primers shared between the genomes, such that either one or, preferentially, both primers in a given PCR can be used for amplification from both genomes. To assure high microarray probe specificity, the software selects primer pairs that generate products of low sequence similarity to other genes within the same genome. We used the software to design PCR primers for 2182 and 1960 genes from the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, respectively. Primer pairs were shared among 705 pairs of genes, and single primers were shared among 1184 pairs of genes, resulting in a saving of 31% compared to using only unique primers. We also present an alternative primer design method, in which each gene shares primers with two different genes of the other genome, enabling further savings.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Eriksson, S.
    Nilsson, P.
    Bernander, R.
    Early replicating ridge-like domains in archaeal chromosomesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Keskitalo, J.
    Sjödin, A.
    Bhalerao, Rupali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Wissel, K.
    Tandre, K.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Moyle, R.
    Ohmiya, Y.
    Brunner, A.
    Gustafsson, P.
    Karlsson, J.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, O.
    Sandberg, G.
    Strauss, S.
    Sundberg, B.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Jansson, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    A transcriptional timetable of autumn senescence2004In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. R24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have developed genomic tools to allow the genus Populus ( aspens and cottonwoods) to be exploited as a full-featured model for investigating fundamental aspects of tree biology. We have undertaken large-scale expressed sequence tag ( EST) sequencing programs and created Populus microarrays with significant gene coverage. One of the important aspects of plant biology that cannot be studied in annual plants is the gene activity involved in the induction of autumn leaf senescence. Results: On the basis of 36,354 Populus ESTs, obtained from seven cDNA libraries, we have created a DNA microarray consisting of 13,490 clones, spotted in duplicate. Of these clones, 12,376 (92%) were confirmed by resequencing and all sequences were annotated and functionally classified. Here we have used the microarray to study transcript abundance in leaves of a free-growing aspen tree ( Populus tremula) in northern Sweden during natural autumn senescence. Of the 13,490 spotted clones, 3,792 represented genes with significant expression in all leaf samples from the seven studied dates. Conclusions: We observed a major shift in gene expression, coinciding with massive chlorophyll degradation, that reflected a shift from photosynthetic competence to energy generation by mitochondrial respiration, oxidation of fatty acids and nutrient mobilization. Autumn senescence had much in common with senescence in annual plants; for example many proteases were induced. We also found evidence for increased transcriptional activity before the appearance of visible signs of senescence, presumably preparing the leaf for degradation of its components.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Rosenlund, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    Bernander, Rolf
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Global analysis of mRNA stability in the archaeon Sulfolobus2006In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 7, no 10, p. R99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Transcript half-lives differ between organisms, and between groups of genes within the same organism. The mechanisms underlying these differences are not clear, nor are the biochemical properties that determine the stability of a transcript. To address these issues, genome-wide mRNA decay studies have been conducted in eukaryotes and bacteria. In contrast, relatively little is known about RNA stability in the third domain of life, Archaea. Here, we present a microarray-based analysis of mRNA half-lives in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, constituting the first genome-wide study of RNA decay in archaea. Results: The two transcriptomes displayed similar half-life distributions, with medians of about five minutes. Growth-related genes, such as those involved in transcription, translation and energy production, were over-represented among unstable transcripts, whereas uncharacterized genes were over-represented among the most stable. Half-life was negatively correlated with transcript abundance and, unlike the situation in other organisms, also negatively correlated with transcript length. Conclusion: The mRNA half-life distribution of Sulfolobus species is similar to those of much faster growing bacteria, contrasting with the earlier observation that median mRNA half-life is proportional to the minimal length of the cell cycle. Instead, short half-lives may be a general feature of prokaryotic transcriptomes, possibly related to the absence of a nucleus and/or more limited post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. The pattern of growth-related transcripts being among the least stable in Sulfolobus may also indicate that the short half-lives reflect a necessity to rapidly reprogram gene expression upon sudden changes in environmental conditions.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Pelve, Erik A.
    Lindeberg, Stefan
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Bernander, Rolf
    Replication-biased genome organisation in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus2010In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 11, p. 454-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Species of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus harbour three replication origins in their single circular chromosome that are synchronously initiated during replication. Results: We demonstrate that global gene expression in two Sulfolobus species is highly biased, such that early replicating genome regions are more highly expressed at all three origins. The bias by far exceeds what would be anticipated by gene dosage effects alone. In addition, early replicating regions are denser in archaeal core genes (enriched in essential functions), display lower intergenic distances, and are devoid of mobile genetic elements. Conclusion: The strong replication-biased structuring of the Sulfolobus chromosome implies that the multiple replication origins serve purposes other than simply shortening the time required for replication. The higher-level chromosomal organisation could be of importance for minimizing the impact of DNA damage, and may also be linked to transcriptional regulation.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Limnology/Department of Ecology and Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala. Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Riemann, L.
    Bertilsson, S
    Pyrosequencing reveals contrasting seasonal dynamics of taxa within Baltic Sea bacterioplankton communities2010In: ISME JOURNAL, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variation in traits causes bacterial populations to respond in contrasting ways to environmental drivers. Learning about this will help us understand the ecology of individual populations in complex ecosystems. We used 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable region V6 of the 16S rRNA gene to study seasonal dynamics in Baltic Sea bacterioplankton communities, and link community and population changes to biological and chemical factors. Surface samples were collected from May to October 2003 and in May 2004 at the Landsort Deep in the central Baltic Sea Proper. The analysis rendered, on average, 20 200 sequence reads for each of the eight samples analyzed, providing the first detailed description of Baltic Sea bacterial communities. Community composition varied dramatically over time, supporting the idea of strong temporal shifts in bacterioplankton assemblages, and clustered according to season (including two May samples from consecutive years), suggesting repeatable seasonal succession. Overall, community change was most highly correlated with change in phosphorus concentration and temperature. Individual bacterial populations were also identified that tightly co-varied with different Cyanobacteria populations. Comparing the abundance profiles of operational taxonomic units at different phylogenetic distances revealed a weak but significant negative correlation between abundance profile similarity and genetic distance, potentially reflecting habitat filtering of evolutionarily conserved functional traits in the studied bacterioplankton.

  • 19. Bagnoud, Alexandre
    et al.
    de Bruijn, Ino
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Diomidis, Nikitas
    Leupin, Olivier X.
    Schwyn, Bernhard
    Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan
    A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock2016In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 92, no 1, article id UNSP fiv138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H-2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO2. In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills.

  • 20.
    Borgström, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Redin, David
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Berglund, Emelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Phasing of single DNA molecules by massively parallel barcoding2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 7173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput sequencing platforms mainly produce short-read data, resulting in a loss of phasing information for many of the genetic variants analysed. For certain applications, it is vital to know which variant alleles are connected to each individual DNA molecule. Here we demonstrate a method for massively parallel barcoding and phasing of single DNA molecules. First, a primer library with millions of uniquely barcoded beads is generated. When compartmentalized with single DNA molecules, the beads can be used to amplify and tag any target sequences of interest, enabling coupling of the biological information from multiple loci. We apply the assay to bacterial 16S sequencing and up to 94% of the hypothesized phasing events are shown to originate from single molecules. The method enables use of widely available short-read-sequencing platforms to study long single molecules within a complex sample, without losing phase information.

  • 21. Brouns, Stan J. J.
    et al.
    Walther, Jasper
    Snijders, Ambrosius P. L.
    de Werken, Harmen J. G. van
    Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.
    Worm, Petra
    de Vos, Marjon G. J.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Mazon, Hortense F. M.
    van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Salmon, Laurent
    de Vos, Willem M.
    Wright, Phillip C.
    Bernander, Rolf
    van der Oost, John
    Identification of the missing links in prokaryotic pentose oxidation pathways - Evidence for enzyme recruitment2006In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, no 37, p. 27378-27388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pentose metabolism of Archaea is largely unknown. Here, we have employed an integrated genomics approach including DNA microarray and proteomics analyses to elucidate the catabolic pathway for D-arabinose in Sulfolobus solfataricus. During growth on this sugar, a small set of genes appeared to be differentially expressed compared with growth on D-glucose. These genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified and biochemically studied. This showed that D-arabinose is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate by the consecutive action of a number of previously uncharacterized enzymes, including a D-arabinose dehydrogenase, a D-arabinonate dehydratase, a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase, and a 2,5-dioxopentanoate dehydrogenase. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed a palindromic sequence upstream of the TATA box, which is likely to be involved in their concerted transcriptional control. Integration of the obtained biochemical data with genomic context analysis strongly suggests the occurrence of pentose oxidation pathways in both Archaea and Bacteria, and predicts the involvement of additional enzyme components. Moreover, it revealed striking genetic similarities between the catabolic pathways for pentoses, hexaric acids, and hydroxyproline degradation, which support the theory of metabolic pathway genesis by enzyme recruitment.

  • 22. Dick, G J
    et al.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Baker, B J
    Simmons, S L
    Thomas, B C
    Yelton, A P
    Banfield, J F
    Community-wide analysis of microbial genome sequence signatures2009In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 10, no 8, p. R85-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Analyses of DNA sequences from cultivated microorganisms have revealed genome-wide, taxa-specific nucleotide compositional characteristics, referred to as genome signatures. These signatures have far-reaching implications for understanding genome evolution and potential application in classification of metagenomic sequence fragments. However, little is known regarding the distribution of genome signatures in natural microbial communities or the extent to which environmental factors shape them. RESULTS: We analyzed metagenomic sequence data from two acidophilic biofilm communities, including composite genomes reconstructed for nine archaea, three bacteria, and numerous associated viruses, as well as thousands of unassigned fragments from strain variants and low-abundance organisms. Genome signatures, in the form of tetranucleotide frequencies analyzed by emergent self-organizing maps, segregated sequences from all known populations sharing < 50 to 60% average amino acid identity and revealed previously unknown genomic clusters corresponding to low-abundance organisms and a putative plasmid. Signatures were pervasive genome-wide. Clusters were resolved because intra-genome differences resulting from translational selection or protein adaptation to the intracellular (pH approximately 5) versus extracellular (pH approximately 1) environment were small relative to inter-genome differences. We found that these genome signatures stem from multiple influences but are primarily manifested through codon composition, which we propose is the result of genome-specific mutational biases. CONCLUSIONS: An important conclusion is that shared environmental pressures and interactions among coevolving organisms do not obscure genome signatures in acid mine drainage communities. Thus, genome signatures can be used to assign sequence fragments to populations, an essential prerequisite if metagenomics is to provide ecological and biochemical insights into the functioning of microbial communities.

  • 23. Dupont, Chris L.
    et al.
    Larsson, John
    Yooseph, Shibu
    Ininbergs, Karolina
    Goll, Johannes
    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes
    McCrow, John P.
    Celepli, Narin
    Allen, Lisa Zeigler
    Ekman, Martin
    Lucas, Andrew J.
    Hagström, Åke
    Thiagarajan, Mathangi
    Brindefalk, Björn
    Richter, Alexander R.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tenney, Aaron
    Lundin, Daniel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tovchigrechko, Andrey
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Brami, Daniel
    Badger, Jonathan H.
    Allen, Andrew E.
    Rusch, Douglas B.
    Hoffman, Jeff
    Norrby, Erling
    Friedman, Robert
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Venter, J. Craig
    Bergman, Birgitta
    Functional Tradeoffs Underpin Salinity-Driven Divergence in Microbial Community Composition2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e89549-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial community composition and functional potential change subtly across gradients in the surface ocean. In contrast, while there are significant phylogenetic divergences between communities from freshwater and marine habitats, the underlying mechanisms to this phylogenetic structuring yet remain unknown. We hypothesized that the functional potential of natural bacterial communities is linked to this striking divide between microbiomes. To test this hypothesis, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities along a 1,800 km transect in the Baltic Sea area, encompassing a continuous natural salinity gradient from limnic to fully marine conditions, was explored. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that salinity is the main determinant of dramatic changes in microbial community composition, but also of large scale changes in core metabolic functions of bacteria. Strikingly, genetically and metabolically different pathways for key metabolic processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis of quinones and isoprenoids, glycolysis and osmolyte transport, were differentially abundant at high and low salinities. These shifts in functional capacities were observed at multiple taxonomic levels and within dominant bacterial phyla, while bacteria, such as SAR11, were able to adapt to the entire salinity gradient. We propose that the large differences in central metabolism required at high and low salinities dictate the striking divide between freshwater and marine microbiomes, and that the ability to inhabit different salinity regimes evolved early during bacterial phylogenetic differentiation. These findings significantly advance our understanding of microbial distributions and stress the need to incorporate salinity in future climate change models that predict increased levels of precipitation and a reduction in salinity.

  • 24. Edberg, F.
    et al.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmström, S. J. M.
    Bacterial Community Composition in the Water Column of a Lake Formed by a Former Uranium Open Pit Mine2012In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 870-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining of pyrite minerals is a major environmental issue involving both biological and geochemical processes. Here we present a study of an artificial lake of a former uranium open pit mine with the aim to connect the chemistry and bacterial community composition (454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes) in the stratified water column. A shift in the water chemistry from oxic conditions in the epilimnion to anoxic, alkaline, and metal and sulfide-rich conditions in the hypolimnion was corresponded by a strong shift in the bacterial community, with few shared operational taxonomic units (OTU) between the water layers. The epilimnetic bacterial community of the lake (~20 years old) showed similarities to other temperate freshwater lakes, while the hypolimnetic bacterial community showed similarity to extreme chemical environments. The epilimnetic bacterial community had dominance of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The hypolimnion displayed a higher bacterial diversity and was dominated by the phototrophic green sulphur bacterium of the genus Chlorobium (ca. 40 % of the total community). Deltaproteobacteria were only represented in the hypolimnion and the most abundant OTUs were affiliated with ferric iron and sulfate reducers of the genus Geobacter and Desulfobulbus, respectively. The chemistry is clearly controlling, especially the hypolimnetic, bacterial community but the community composition also indicates that the bacteria are involved in metal cycling in the lake.

  • 25. Ettema, Thijs J. G.
    et al.
    Lindas, Ann-Christin
    Hjort, Karin
    Poplawski, Andrzej B.
    Kaessmann, Henrik
    Grogan, Dennis W.
    Kelman, Zvi
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pelve, Erik
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Svard, Staffan G.
    Rolf Bernander (1956-2014): pioneer of the archaeal cell cycle (vol 92, pg 903, 2014)2014In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 582-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Ettema, Thijs J. G.
    et al.
    Lindås, Ann-Christin
    Hjort, Karin
    Poplawski, Andrzej B.
    Kaessmann, Henrik
    Grogan, Dennis W.
    Kelman, Zvi
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Pelve, Erik A.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Svard, Staffan G.
    Rolf Bernander (1956-2014): pioneer of the archaeal cell cycle Obituary2014In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 903-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On 19 January 2014 Rolf (Roffe') Bernander passed away unexpectedly. Rolf was a dedicated scientist; his research aimed at unravelling the cell biology of the archaeal domain of life, especially cell cycle-related questions, but he also made important contributions in other areas of microbiology. Rolf had a professor position in the Molecular Evolution programme at Uppsala University, Sweden for about 8 years, and in January 2013 he became chair professor at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute at Stockholm University in Sweden. Rolf was an exceptional colleague and will be deeply missed by his family and friends, and the colleagues and co-workers that he leaves behind in the scientific community. He will be remembered for his endless enthusiasm for science, his analytical mind, and his quirky sense of humour.

  • 27. Farnelid, Hanna
    et al.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Abu Al-Soud, Waleed
    Hansen, Lars H.
    Sørensen, Søren
    Steward, Grieg F.
    Hagstöom, Åke
    Riemann, Lasse
    Nitrogenase Gene Amplicons from Global Marine Surface Waters Are Dominated by Genes of Non-Cyanobacteria2011In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 4, p. e19223-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are thought to be the main N-2-fixing organisms (diazotrophs) in marine pelagic waters, but recent molecular analyses indicate that non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs are also present and active. Existing data are, however, restricted geographically and by limited sequencing depths. Our analysis of 79,090 nitrogenase (nifH) PCR amplicons encoding 7,468 unique proteins from surface samples (ten DNA samples and two RNA samples) collected at ten marine locations worldwide provides the first in-depth survey of a functional bacterial gene and yield insights into the composition and diversity of the nifH gene pool in marine waters. Great divergence in nifH composition was observed between sites. Cyanobacteria-like genes were most frequent among amplicons from the warmest waters, but overall the data set was dominated by nifH sequences most closely related to non-cyanobacteria. Clusters related to Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Delta-Proteobacteria were most common and showed distinct geographic distributions. Sequences related to anaerobic bacteria (nifH Cluster III) were generally rare, but preponderant in cold waters, especially in the Arctic. Although the two transcript samples were dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria, 42% of the identified non-cyanobacterial nifH clusters from the corresponding DNA samples were also detected in cDNA. The study indicates that non-cyanobacteria account for a substantial part of the nifH gene pool in marine surface waters and that these genes are at least occasionally expressed. The contribution of non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs to the global N-2 fixation budget cannot be inferred from sequence data alone, but the prevalence of non-cyanobacterial nifH genes and transcripts suggest that these bacteria are ecologically significant.

  • 28. Farnelid, Hanna
    et al.
    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Jost, Guenter
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Juergens, Klaus
    Riemann, Lasse
    Active nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria at and below the chemocline of the central Baltic Sea2013In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 1413-1423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea receives large nitrogen inputs by diazotrophic (N-2-fixing) heterocystous cyanobacteria but the significance of heterotrophic N-2 fixation has not been studied. Here, the diversity, abundance and transcription of the nifH fragment of the nitrogenase enzyme in two basins of the Baltic Sea proper was examined. N-2 fixation was measured at the surface (5 m) and in anoxic water (200 m). Vertical sampling profiles of >10 and <10 mu m size fractions were collected in 2007, 2008 and 2011 at the Gotland Deep and in 2011 in the Bornholm Basin. Both of these stations are characterized by permanently anoxic bottom water. The 454-pyrosequencing nifH analysis revealed a diverse assemblage of nifH genes related to alpha-, beta- and gammaproteobacteria (nifH cluster I) and anaerobic bacteria (nifH cluster III) at and below the chemocline. Abundances of genes and transcripts of seven diazotrophic phylotypes were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealing abundances of heterotrophic nifH phylotypes of up to 2.1 x 10(7) nifH copies l(-1). Abundant nifH transcripts (up to 3.2 x 10(4) transcripts l(-1)) within nifH cluster III and co-occurring N-2 fixation (0.44 +/- 0.26 nmol l(-1) day(-1)) in deep water suggests that heterotrophic diazotrophs are fixing N2 in anoxic ammonium-rich waters. Our results reveal that N-2 fixation in the Baltic Sea is not limited to illuminated N-deplete surface waters and suggest that N-2 fixation could also be of importance in other suboxic regions of the world's oceans.

  • 29. Gantner, S
    et al.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alonso-Saez, L
    Bertilsson, S
    Novel primers for 16S rRNA-based archaeal community analyses in environmental samples2011In: Journal of Microbiological Methods, ISSN 0167-7012, E-ISSN 1872-8359, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 12-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Next generation sequencing technologies for in depth analyses of complex microbial communities rely on rational primer design based on up-to-date reference databases. Most of the 16S rRNA-gene based analyses of environmental Archaea community composition use PCR primers developed from small data sets several years ago, making an update long overdue. Here we present a new set of archaeal primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene designed from 8500 aligned archaeal sequences in the SILVA database. The primers 340F-1000R showed a high archaeal specificity (<1% bacteria amplification) covering 93 and 97% of available sequences for Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota respectively. In silico tests of the primers revealed at least 38% higher coverage for Archaea compared to other commonly used primers. Empirical tests with clone libraries confirmed the high specificity of the primer pair to Archaea in three biomes: surface waters in the Arctic Ocean, the pelagic zone of a temperate lake and a methanogenic bioreactor. The clone libraries featured both Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota in variable proportions and revealed dramatic differences in the archaeal community composition and minimal phylogenetic overlap between samples.

  • 30.
    Gharizadeh, Baback
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Käller, Max
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nyrén, Pål
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Andersson,, Anders F.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Viral and microbial genotyping by a combination of multiplex competitive hybridization and specific extension followed by hybridization to generic tag arrays2003In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 31, no 22, p. e146-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Detection and identification of microbial pathogens are important for disease diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis measurements. By introducing an innovative technique, we show a robust, reliable and accurate microarray-based method for identification of microbial pathogens. The technique utilizes a unique combination of multiplex competitive hybridization, which enhances hybridization accuracy of oligonucleotides to the specific target, and apyrase-mediated allele-specific extension, which improves specific extension. As a model system, different clinically relevant human papillomaviruses were selected for this study. The method generated accurate results and proves to be promising for specific and correct microbial and viral typing.

  • 31. Grubisic, Lorena M.
    et al.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Eiler, Alexander
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Brutemark, Andreas
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Gantner, Stephan
    Riemann, Lasse
    Beier, Sara
    Lake bacterioplankton dynamics over diurnal timescales2017In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 191-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Planktonic bacterial community dynamics over short timescales can be of great importance for food webs and ecosystem functioning but are rarely described when microbial community and composition are assessed. To study the significance of such dynamics we sampled the surface water at the deepest point of a mesotrophic lake (Lake Erken, Sweden) every third hour over two days. 2. By combining 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes with bromodeoxyuridine immunocapturing of DNA, replicating populations were identified and compared to the community retrieved from total DNA samples. This comparison revealed a significant difference between the actively replicating and total community. 3. The high-frequency diurnal sampling was compared to a year-long survey conducted in the same lake in order to compare the diurnal and seasonal variation in bacterioplankton community composition. At the diurnal-scale, the variation was significantly higher in the replicating than in the total community. However, variation in both active and total diurnal community was significantly lower than the variation in the seasonal total community. 4. Our analysis revealed pronounced short-term dynamics of individual bacterial populations uncoupled from the diurnal light cycle. For example, the proliferating fraction of the most abundant bacterial tribe (LD12) followed a cyclic pattern that covaried with viral abundance. This implies that environmental factors other than light may act as important drivers of microbial community composition, at least in mesotrophic Lake Erken.

  • 32. Herlemann, Daniel P. R.
    et al.
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Juergens, Klaus
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Waniek, Joanna J.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Transitions in bacterial communities along the 2000 km salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea2011In: ISME JOURNAL, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 1571-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salinity is a major factor controlling the distribution of biota in aquatic systems, and most aquatic multicellular organisms are either adapted to life in saltwater or freshwater conditions. Consequently, the saltwater-freshwater mixing zones in coastal or estuarine areas are characterized by limited faunal and floral diversity. Although changes in diversity and decline in species richness in brackish waters is well documented in aquatic ecology, it is unknown to what extent this applies to bacterial communities. Here, we report a first detailed bacterial inventory from vertical profiles of 60 sampling stations distributed along the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea, one of world's largest brackish water environments, generated using 454 pyrosequencing of partial (400 bp) 16S rRNA genes. Within the salinity gradient, bacterial community composition altered at broad and finer-scale phylogenetic levels. Analogous to faunal communities within brackish conditions, we identified a bacterial brackish water community comprising a diverse combination of freshwater and marine groups, along with populations unique to this environment. As water residence times in the Baltic Sea exceed 3 years, the observed bacterial community cannot be the result of mixing of fresh water and saltwater, but our study represents the first detailed description of an autochthonous brackish microbiome. In contrast to the decline in the diversity of multicellular organisms, reduced bacterial diversity at brackish conditions could not be established. It is possible that the rapid adaptation rate of bacteria has enabled a variety of lineages to fill what for higher organisms remains a challenging and relatively unoccupied ecological niche.

  • 33. Herlemann, Daniel P. R.
    et al.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Juergens, Klaus
    Phylogenetic Signals of Salinity and Season in Bacterial Community Composition Across the Salinity Gradient of the Baltic Sea2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, article id 1883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the key processes that control bacterial community composition has enabled predictions of bacterial distribution and function within ecosystems. In this study, we used the Baltic Sea as a model system to quantify the phylogenetic signal of salinity and season with respect to bacterioplankton community composition. The abundances of 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reads were analyzed from samples obtained from similar geographic locations in July and February along a brackish to marine salinity gradient in the Baltic Sea. While there was no distinct pattern of bacterial richness at different salinities, the number of bacterial phylotypes in winter was significantly higher than in summer. Bacterial community composition in brackish vs. marine conditions, and in July vs. February was significantly different. Non-metric multidimensional scaling showed that bacterial community composition was primarily separated according to salinity and secondly according to seasonal differences at all taxonomic ranks tested. Similarly, quantitative phylogenetic clustering implicated a phylogenetic signal for both salinity and seasonality. Our results suggest that global patterns of bacterial community composition with respect to salinity and season are the result of phylogenetically clustered ecological preferences with stronger imprints from salinity.

  • 34. Herlemann, Daniel P. R.
    et al.
    Lundin, Daniel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Jürgens, Klaus
    Zheng, Zongli
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Metagenomic De Novo Assembly of an Aquatic Representative of the Verrucomicrobial Class Spartobacteria2013In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 4, no 3, p. e00569-12-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The verrucomicrobial subdivision 2 class Spartobacteria is one of the most abundant bacterial lineages in soil and has recently also been found to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments. A 16S rRNA gene study from samples spanning the entire salinity range of the Baltic Sea indicated that, in the pelagic brackish water, a phylotype of the Spartobacteria is one of the dominating bacteria during summer. Phylogenetic analyses of related 16S rRNA genes indicate that a purely aquatic lineage within the Spartobacteria exists. Since no aquatic representative from the Spartobacteria has been cultured or sequenced, the metabolic capacity and ecological role of this lineage are yet unknown. In this study, we reconstructed the genome and metabolic potential of the abundant Baltic Sea Spartobacteria phylotype by metagenomics. Binning of genome fragments by nucleotide composition and a self-organizing map recovered the near-complete genome of the organism, the gene content of which suggests an aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. Notably, we found 23 glycoside hydrolases that likely allow the use of a variety of carbohydrates, like cellulose, mannan, xylan, chitin, and starch, as carbon sources. In addition, a complete pathway for sulfate utilization was found, indicating catabolic processing of sulfated polysaccharides, commonly found in aquatic phytoplankton. The high frequency of glycoside hydrolase genes implies an important role of this organism in the aquatic carbon cycle. Spatiotemporal data of the phylotype's distribution within the Baltic Sea indicate a connection to Cyanobacteria that may be the main source of the polysaccharide substrates. IMPORTANCE The ecosystem roles of many phylogenetic lineages are not yet well understood. One such lineage is the class Spartobacteria within the Verrucomicrobia that, despite being abundant in soil and aquatic systems, is relatively poorly studied. Here we circumvented the difficulties of growing aquatic Verrucomicrobia by applying shotgun metagenomic sequencing on a water sample from the Baltic Sea. By using a method based on sequence signatures, we were able to in silico isolate genome fragments belonging to a phylotype of the Spartobacteria. The genome, which represents the first aquatic representative of this clade, encodes a diversity of glycoside hydrolases that likely allow degradation of various complex carbohydrates. Since the phylotype cooccurs with Cyanobacteria, these may be the primary producers of the carbohydrate substrates. The phylotype, which is highly abundant in the Baltic Sea during summer, may thus play an important role in the carbon cycle of this ecosystem.

  • 35. Hertzberg, M
    et al.
    Aspeborg, H
    Schrader, J
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Erlandsson, R
    Blomqvist, K
    Bhalerao, R
    Uhlen, M
    Teeri, T T
    Lundeberg, J
    Sundberg, B
    Nilsson, P
    Sandberg, G
    A transcriptional roadmap to wood formation2001In: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, Vol. 98, no 25, p. 14732-14737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large vascular meristem of poplar trees with its highly organized secondary xylem enables the boundaries between different developmental zones to be easily distinguished. This property of wood-forming tissues allowed us to determine a unique tissue-specific transcript profile for a well defined developmental gradient. RNA was prepared from different developmental stages of xylogenesis for DNA microarray analysis by using a hybrid aspen unigene set consisting of 2,995 expressed sequence tags. The analysis revealed that the genes encoding lignin and cellulose biosynthetic enzymes, as well as a number of transcription factors and other potential regulators of xylogenesis, are under strict developmental stage-specific transcriptional regulation.

  • 36.
    Hu, Yue O. O.
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Karlson, Bengt
    Charvet, Sophie
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Diversity of Pico- to Mesoplankton along the 2000 km Salinity Gradient of the Baltic Sea2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, article id 679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial plankton form the productive base of both marine and freshwater ecosystems and are key drivers of global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients. Plankton diversity is immense with representations from all major phyla within the three domains of life. So far, plankton monitoring has mainly been based on microscopic identification, which has limited sensitivity and reproducibility, not least because of the numerical majority of plankton being unidentifiable under the light microscope. High-throughput sequencing of taxonomic marker genes offers a means to identify taxa inaccessible by traditional methods; thus, recent studies have unveiled an extensive previously unknown diversity of plankton. Here, we conducted ultra-deep Illumina sequencing (average 105 sequences/sample) of rRNA gene amplicons of surface water eukaryotic and bacterial plankton communities sampled in summer along a 2000 km transect following the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Community composition was strongly correlated with salinity for both bacterial and eukaryotic plankton assemblages, highlighting the importance of salinity for structuring the biodiversity within this ecosystem. In contrast, no clear trends in alpha-diversity for bacterial or eukaryotic communities could be detected along the transect. The distribution of major planktonic taxa followed expected patterns as observed in monitoring programs, but groups novel to the Baltic Sea were also identified, such as relatives to the coccolithophore Erniliana huxleyi detected in the northern Baltic Sea. This study provides the first ultra-deep sequencing-based survey on eukaryotic and bacterial plankton biogeography in the Baltic Sea.

  • 37. Huang, Jiaqi
    et al.
    Zheng, Zongli
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Ye, Weimin
    Rapid Screening of Complex DNA Samples by Single-Molecule Amplification and Sequencing2011In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 5, p. e19723-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial cloning makes Sanger sequencing of complex DNA samples possible but is labor intensive. We present a simple, rapid and robust method that enables laboratories without special equipment to perform single-molecule amplicon sequencing, although in a low-throughput manner, from sub-picogram quantities of DNA. The method can also be used for quick quality control of next-generation sequencing libraries, as was demonstrated for a metagenomic sample.

  • 38.
    Hugerth, Luisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. Science for Life Laboratory.
    Lindh, Markus
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems - Linnaeus University.
    Sjöqvist, Conny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Carina, Bunse
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems - Linnaeus University.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems - Linnaeus University.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems - Linnaeus University.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Seasonal dynamics and interactions among Baltic Sea prokaryoticand eukaryotic plankton assemblagesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main goals of microbial ecology is to identify the mechanismsthat regulate patterns in community structure at temporal scalescompatible with populations’ turnover times across complete seasonalcycles. Here, we examined high-frequency temporal dynamics of marineplankton from a sampling effort covering 2011-2013, roughly twice weekly,comprising 144 samples. Bacterial and eukaryotic communities wereprofiled by 16S and 18S high-throughput sequencing, respectively.Interestingly, we found that no combination of the measured environmentalparameters could predict a significant proportion of the variation inpopulation dynamics of bacterioplankton, and even less so for eukaryoticplankton. Large differences in physicochemical conditions and communitycomposition typical of temperate climates mean that different regimes canquickly succeed each other over the year, with the relative importance ofdifferent drivers changing equally rapidly. Nevertheless, our approachrevealed interesting recurrent co-occurrence patterns across distinctenvironmental changes. Hence, we could make abundance predictions formore than half of the most frequent OTUs based on interactions with otherOTUs. These results suggests that a complex set of biotic interactions arecontributing to temporal patterns among planktonic assemblages despiterapid changes in environmental conditions.

  • 39.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Analysing Microbial Community Composition through Amplicon Sequencing: From Sampling to Hypothesis Testing2017In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, article id 1561Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial ecology as a scientific field is fundamentally driven by technological advance. The past decade's revolution in DNA sequencing cost and throughput has made it possible for most research groups to map microbial community composition in environments of interest. However, the computational and statistical methodology required to analyse this kind of data is often not part of the biologist training. In this review, we give a historical perspective on the use of sequencing data inmicrobial ecology and restate the current need for this method; but also highlight the major caveats with standard practices for handling these data, from sample collection and library preparation to statistical analysis. Further, we outline the main new analytical tools that have been developed in the past few years to bypass these caveats, as well as highlight the major requirements of common statistical practices and the extent to which they are applicable to microbial data. Besides delving into the meaning of select alpha- and beta-diversity measures, we give special consideration to techniques for finding the main drivers of community dissimilarity and for interaction network construction. While every project design has specific needs, this review should serve as a starting point for considering what options are available.

  • 40.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Larsson, John
    Alneberg, Johannes
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Metagenome-assembled genomes uncover a global brackish microbiome2015In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 16, article id 279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Microbes are main drivers of biogeochemical cycles in oceans and lakes. Although the genome is a foundation for understanding the metabolism, ecology and evolution of an organism, few bacterioplankton genomes have been sequenced, partly due to difficulties in cultivating them. Results: We use automatic binning to reconstruct a large number of bacterioplankton genomes from a metagenomic time-series from the Baltic Sea, one of world's largest brackish water bodies. These genomes represent novel species within typical freshwater and marine clades, including clades not previously sequenced. The genomes' seasonal dynamics follow phylogenetic patterns, but with fine-grained lineage-specific variations, reflected in gene-content. Signs of streamlining are evident in most genomes, and estimated genome sizes correlate with abundance variation across filter size fractions. Comparing the genomes with globally distributed metagenomes reveals significant fragment recruitment at high sequence identity from brackish waters in North America, but little from lakes or oceans. This suggests the existence of a global brackish metacommunity whose populations diverged from freshwater and marine relatives over 100,000 years ago, long before the Baltic Sea was formed (8000 years ago). This markedly contrasts to most Baltic Sea multicellular organisms, which are locally adapted populations of freshwater or marine counterparts. Conclusions: We describe the gene content, temporal dynamics and biogeography of a large set of new bacterioplankton genomes assembled from metagenomes. We propose that brackish environments exert such strong selection that lineages adapted to them flourish globally with limited influence from surrounding aquatic communities.

  • 41.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Muller, Emilie E. L.
    Hu, Yue O. O.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lebrun, Laura A. M.
    Roume, Hugo
    Lundin, Daniel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wilmes, Paul
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic Design of 18S rRNA Gene Primers for Determining Eukaryotic Diversity in Microbial Consortia2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 095567-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) amplicons has opened up the door to large-scale comparative studies of microbial community structures. The short reads currently produced by massively parallel sequencing technologies make the choice of sequencing region crucial for accurate phylogenetic assignments. While for 16S rDNA, relevant regions have been well described, no truly systematic design of 18S rDNA primers aimed at resolving eukaryotic diversity has yet been reported. Here we used 31,862 18S rDNA sequences to design a set of broad-taxonomic range degenerate PCR primers. We simulated the phylogenetic information that each candidate primer pair would retrieve using paired-or single-end reads of various lengths, representing different sequencing technologies. Primer pairs targeting the V4 region performed best, allowing discrimination with paired-end reads as short as 150 bp (with 75% accuracy at genus level). The conditions for PCR amplification were optimised for one of these primer pairs and this was used to amplify 18S rDNA sequences from isolates as well as from a range of environmental samples which were then Illumina sequenced and analysed, revealing good concordance between expected and observed results. In summary, the reported primer sets will allow minimally biased assessment of eukaryotic diversity in different microbial ecosystems.

  • 42.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wefer, Hugo A.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Lindberg, Mathilda
    Rodin, Sandra
    Engstrand, Lars
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    DegePrime, a Program for Degenerate Primer Design for Broad-Taxonomic-Range PCR in Microbial Ecology Studies2014In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 80, no 16, p. 5116-5123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The taxonomic composition of a microbial community can be deduced by analyzing its rRNA gene content by, e. g., high-throughput DNA sequencing or DNA chips. Such methods typically are based on PCR amplification of rRNA gene sequences using broad-taxonomic-range PCR primers. In these analyses, the use of optimal primers is crucial for achieving an unbiased representation of community composition. Here, we present the computer program DegePrime that, for each position of a multiple sequence alignment, finds a degenerate oligomer of as high coverage as possible and outputs its coverage among taxonomic divisions. We show that our novel heuristic, which we call weighted randomized combination, performs better than previously described algorithms for solving the maximum coverage degenerate primer design problem. We previously used DegePrime to design a broad-taxonomic-range primer pair that targets the bacterial V3-V4 region (341F-805R) (D. P. Herlemann, M. Labrenz, K. Jurgens, S. Bertilsson, J. J. Waniek, and A. F. Andersson, ISME J. 5:1571-1579, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.41), and here we use the program to significantly increase the coverage of a primer pair (515F-806R) widely used for Illumina-based surveys of bacterial and archaeal diversity. By comparison with shotgun metagenomics, we show that the primers give an accurate representation of microbial diversity in natural samples.

  • 43. Jakobsson, H E
    et al.
    Jernberg, C
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Swedish Inst Infect Dis, Dept Bacteriol ; Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Evolutionary Biol Ctr.
    Sjolund-Karlsson, M
    Jansson, J K
    Engstrand, L
    Short-term antibiotic treatment has differing long-term impacts on the human throat and gut microbiome2010In: PLoS One, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 3, p. e9836-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic administration is the standard treatment for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, the long-term consequences of this treatment on the human indigenous microbiota are relatively unexplored. Here we studied short- and long-term effects of clarithromycin and metronidazole treatment, a commonly used therapy regimen against H. pylori, on the indigenous microbiota in the throat and in the lower intestine. The bacterial compositions in samples collected over a four-year period were monitored by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene using 454-based pyrosequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). While the microbial communities of untreated control subjects were relatively stable over time, dramatic shifts were observed one week after antibiotic treatment with reduced bacterial diversity in all treated subjects in both locations. While the microbiota of the different subjects responded uniquely to the antibiotic treatment some general trends could be observed; such as a dramatic decline in Actinobacteria in both throat and feces immediately after treatment. Although the diversity of the microbiota subsequently recovered to resemble the pre treatment states, the microbiota remained perturbed in some cases for up to four years post treatment. In addition, four years after treatment high levels of the macrolide resistance gene erm(B) were found, indicating that antibiotic resistance, once selected for, can persist for longer periods of time than previously recognized. This highlights the importance of a restrictive antibiotic usage in order to prevent subsequent treatment failure and potential spread of antibiotic resistance.

  • 44. Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Harris, Keith
    Quince, Christopher
    Jernberg, Cecilia
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Decreased gut microbiota diversity, delayed Bacteroidetes colonisation and reduced Th1 responses in infants delivered by Caesarean section2014In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    important stimuli for immune development, and a reduced microbial exposure as well as caesarean section (CS) has been associated with the development of allergic disease. Here we address how microbiota development in infants is affected by mode of delivery, and relate differences in colonisation patterns to the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response. Design The postnatal intestinal colonisation pattern was investigated in 24 infants, born vaginally (15) or by CS (nine). The intestinal microbiota were characterised using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after birth. Venous blood levels of Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines were measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Results Infants born through CS had lower total microbiota diversity during the first 2 years of life. CS delivered infants also had a lower abundance and diversity of the Bacteroidetes phylum and were less often colonised with the Bacteroidetes phylum. Infants born through CS had significantly lower levels of the Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in blood. Conclusions CS was associated with a lower total microbial diversity, delayed colonisation of the Bacteroidetes phylum and reduced Th1 responses during the first 2 years of life.

  • 45. Lamei, Sepideh
    et al.
    Hu, Yue O. O.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Tobias C.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Forsgren, Eva
    Vasquez, Alejandra
    Improvement of identification methods for honeybee specific Lactic Acid Bacteria; future approaches2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honeybees face many parasites and pathogens and consequently rely on a diverse set of individual and group-level defenses to prevent disease. The crop microbiota of Apis mellifera, composed of 13 Lactic Acid Bacterial (LAB) species within the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, form a beneficial symbiotic relationship with each other and the honeybee to protect their niche and their host. Possibly playing a vital role in honeybee health, it is important that these honeybee specific Lactic Acid Bacterial (hbs-LAB) symbionts can be correctly identified, isolated and cultured, to further investigate their health promoting properties. We have previously reported successful identification to the strain level by culture-dependent methods and we recently sequenced and annotated the genomes of the 13 hbs-LAB. However, the hitherto applied techniques are unfortunately very time consuming, expensive and not ideal when analyzing a vast quantity of samples. In addition, other researchers have constantly failed to identify the 13 hbs-LAB from honeybee samples by using inadequate media and/or molecular techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing with insufficient discriminatory power. The aim of this study was to develop better and more suitable methods for the identification and cultivation of hbs-LAB. We compared currently used bacterial cultivation media and could for the first time demonstrate a significant variation in the hbs-LAB basic requirements for optimal growth. We also present a new bacterial identification approach based on amplicon sequencing of a region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina platform and an error correction software that can be used to successfully differentiate and rapidly identify the 13 hbs-LAB to the strain level.

  • 46. Lehours, P.
    et al.
    Vale, F. F.
    Bjursell, M. K.
    Melefors, O.
    Advani, R.
    Glavas, S.
    Guegueniat, J.
    Gontier, E.
    Lacomme, S.
    Alves Matos, A.
    Menard, A.
    Megraud, F.
    Engstrand, L.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome sequencing reveals a phage in Helicobacter pylori2011In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 2, no 6, p. e00239-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa in more than half of the human population; in a subset of this population, its presence is associated with development of severe disease, such as gastric cancer. Genomic analysis of several strains has revealed an extensive H pylori pan-genome, likely to grow as more genomes are sampled. Here we describe the draft genome sequence (63 contigs; 26× mean coverage) of H pylori strain B45, isolated from a patient with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The major finding was a 24.6-kb prophage integrated in the bacterial genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (22/27) with prophage region II of Helicobacter acinonychis strain Sheeba. After UV treatment of liquid cultures, circular DNA carrying the prophage integrase gene could be detected, and intracellular tailed phage-like particles were observed in H pylori cells by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that phage production can be induced from the prophage. PCR amplification and sequencing of the integrase gene from 341 H pylori strains from different geographic regions revealed a high prevalence of the prophage (21.4%). Phylogenetic reconstruction showed four distinct clusters in the integrase gene, three of which tended to be specific for geographic regions. Our study implies that phages may play important roles in the ecology and evolution of H pylori.

  • 47. Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Sjostedt, Johanna
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Baltar, Federico
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Muthusamy, Saraladevi
    Legrand, Catherine
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Disentangling seasonal bacterioplankton population dynamics by high-frequency sampling2015In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 2459-2476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiyear comparisons of bacterioplankton succession reveal that environmental conditions drive community shifts with repeatable patterns between years. However, corresponding insight into bacterioplankton dynamics at a temporal resolution relevant for detailed examination of variation and characteristics of specific populations within years is essentially lacking. During 1 year, we collected 46 samples in the Baltic Sea for assessing bacterial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing (nearly twice weekly during productive season). Beta-diversity analysis showed distinct clustering of samples, attributable to seemingly synchronous temporal transitions among populations (populations defined by 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). A wide spectrum of bacterioplankton dynamics was evident, where divergent temporal patterns resulted both from pronounced differences in relative abundance and presence/absence of populations. Rates of change in relative abundance calculated for individual populations ranged from 0.23 to 1.79 day(-1). Populations that were persistently dominant, transiently abundant or generally rare were found in several major bacterial groups, implying evolution has favoured a similar variety of life strategies within these groups. These findings suggest that high temporal resolution sampling allows constraining the timescales and frequencies at which distinct populations transition between being abundant or rare, thus potentially providing clues about physical, chemical or biological forcing on bacterioplankton community structure.

  • 48. Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Sjostedt, Johanna
    Ekstam, Borje
    Casini, Michele
    Lundin, Daniel
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hu, Yue O. O.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Legrand, Catherine
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Metapopulation theory identifies biogeographical patterns among core and satellite marine bacteria scaling from tens to thousands of kilometers2017In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 1222-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metapopulation theory developed in terrestrial ecology provides applicable frameworks for interpreting the role of local and regional processes in shaping species distribution patterns. Yet, empirical testing of metapopulation models on microbial communities is essentially lacking. We determined regional bacterioplankton dynamics from monthly transect sampling in the Baltic Sea Proper using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A strong positive trend was found between local relative abundance and occupancy of populations. Notably, the occupancy-frequency distributions were significantly bimodal with a satellite mode of rare endemic populations and a core mode of abundant cosmopolitan populations (e.g. Synechococcus, SAR11 and SAR86 clade members). Temporal changes in population distributions supported several theoretical frameworks. Still, bimodality was found among bacterioplankton communities across the entire Baltic Sea, and was also frequent in globally distributed datasets. Datasets spanning waters with widely different physicochemical characteristics or environmental gradients typically lacked significant bimodal patterns. When such datasets were divided into subsets with coherent environmental conditions, bimodal patterns emerged, highlighting the importance of positive feedbacks between local abundance and occupancy within specific biomes. Thus, metapopulation theory applied to microbial biogeography can provide novel insights into the mechanisms governing shifts in biodiversity resulting from natural or anthropogenically induced changes in the environment.

  • 49. Logue, Jurg B.
    et al.
    Stedmon, Colin A.
    Kellerman, Anne M.
    Nielsen, Nikoline J.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Lindstrom, Eva S.
    Kritzberg, Emma S.
    Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 533-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacteria play a central role in the cycling of carbon, yet our understanding of the relationship between the taxonomic composition and the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still poor. In this experimental study, we were able to demonstrate a direct link between community composition and ecosystem functioning in that differently structured aquatic bacterial communities differed in their degradation of terrestrially derived DOM. Although the same amount of carbon was processed, both the temporal pattern of degradation and the compounds degraded differed among communities. We, moreover, uncovered that low-molecular-weight carbon was available to all communities for utilisation, whereas the ability to degrade carbon of greater molecular weight was a trait less widely distributed. Finally, whereas the degradation of either low-or high-molecular-weight carbon was not restricted to a single phylogenetic clade, our results illustrate that bacterial taxa of similar phylogenetic classification differed substantially in their association with the degradation of DOM compounds. Applying techniques that capture the diversity and complexity of both bacterial communities and DOM, our study provides new insight into how the structure of bacterial communities may affect processes of biogeochemical significance.

  • 50. Logue, Jürg Brendan
    et al.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Drakare, Stina
    Lanzén, Anders
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Freshwater bacterioplankton richness in oligotrophic lakes depends on nutrient availability rather than on species-area relationships2012In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 1127-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central goal in ecology is to grasp the mechanisms that underlie and maintain biodiversity and patterns in its spatial distribution can provide clues about those mechanisms. Here, we investigated what might determine the bacterioplankton richness (BR) in lakes by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We further provide a BR estimate based upon a sampling depth and accuracy, which, to our knowledge, are unsurpassed for freshwater bacterioplankton communities. Our examination of 22 669 sequences per lake showed that freshwater BR in fourteen nutrient-poor lakes was positively influenced by nutrient availability. Our study is, thus, consistent with the finding that the supply of available nutrients is a major driver of species richness; a pattern that may well be universally valid to the world of both micro- and macro-organisms. We, furthermore, observed that BR increased with elevated landscape position, most likely as a consequence of differences in nutrient availability. Finally, BR decreased with increasing lake and catchment area that is negative species-area relationships (SARs) were recorded; a finding that re-opens the debate about whether positive SARs can indeed be found in the microbial world and whether positive SARs can in fact be pronounced as one of the few 'laws' in ecology.

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