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  • 1. Case, P.
    et al.
    Piñeiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Aesthetics, performativity and resistance in the narratives of a computer programming community2006In: Human Relations, ISSN 0018-7267, E-ISSN 1741-282X, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 753-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on an empirical study of a computer programmer community, focusing on online exchanges in which participants discuss the aesthetics of coding. Naturalistic data were collected during a 12-month period of non-participant observation of the software community in question. The authors estimate that approximately 200 participants are represented in the main dataset. Narrative data are presented under two interpretative rubrics: 'programmer performatives' and 'commercial performativity'. We seek to demonstrate that there is the online equivalent of a great deal of intricate 'face work' that programmers do in their narrative exchanges. In expressing and conforming to a 'hacker ethic', programmer narratives simultaneously evince technical, ethical and aesthetic motives. There is frequent articulation of resistance and subversive intent expressed toward representatives of employers and employing organizations. Software engineers are acutely aware of the facets of organizational control and demands for performativity that they feel compromise their artistic endeavours. Programmers make sense of their condition ideologically both through their practical pursuit of coding ideals and by espousing a hacker ethic that legitimates their passionate engagement with coding tasks.

  • 2.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Clinical Innovation Fellowship: an innovation / education initiative for medtech2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, highly based on collaboration betweenstakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. Key areas of development are; overallprinciples of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation process as educationand practice, needs in healthcare & medtech industry.This paper presents a Swedish initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, which is highly based oncollaboration between stakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. The goal of this post-graduate education in clinic-centered innovation is to contribute to the development of a regional medical device cluster, toeducate the health care and medical device innovators and leaders for the future and to develop technical and organizational tools and solutions for the participating clinics.A few years ago some individuals at the Center for Technology, Medicine and Health, CTMH, got in contact with theStanford Biodesign Innovation program. Since the need for collaboration across boundaries and silos had been identified there was almost an instant initiative to try this model in Sweden. A dedicated effort to get funding and buildingresearch capacity started in parallel. A joint project for designing and developing a Swedish variation of the programwas set up.The paper presents examples of an existing innovation research education program at Stanford University and thenthe Swedish initiative that starts in the fall of 2010. Then issues and key areas of interest that have been identified indevelopment of the Swedish initiative are presented.These are; overall principles of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation processas education and practive, and finally particular needs in Swedish health care and medical technology industry. Animportant difference between the programs at Stanford and Stockholm is the inclusion in the Swedish initiative of theorganizational issues faced by the clinics. These issues are exemplified with leadership and management theoriesidentifying health care as a technology intensive and safety critical socio-technical system. Finally these key areas of interest are then consolidated in designing the overall approach to the Swedish initiative and the curriculum in the fellowsspecialized training.The paper reports findings from an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify obstacles and success factorsfor initiating such an initiative within Swedish university and healthcare structures. The research project also aims toevaluate at least three cycles of the program.

  • 3.
    Pineiro, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Lindahl, M.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Multiprofessional innovation teams as amoeba: lessons for the teachers2011In: ICERI2011 Proceedings / [ed] Torres, IC; Chova, LG; Martinez, AL, 2011, p. 7259-7259Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Piñeiro, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH. Stanford University, United States .
    Case, P.
    Outsourcing in high-tech corporations: Voices of dissent, resistance, and complicity in a computer programming community2008In: Management Practices in High-Tech Environments, IGI Global, 2008, p. 209-227Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management has historically sought to restrict the options for manual workers to rebel by simplifying and limiting their jobs according to Tayloristic principles. The need for their experience and knowledge has been consciously minimized, having been relocated instead to supervisors and middle managers, working routines and machines. In high-tech industries, by contrast, the workers' fundamental contribution to the enterprise is their very knowledge, offering other possibilities for rebellious activities or, at least, for rebellious plans. This chapter focuses on one of the common denominators in the exchanges among programmers, namely the concept of knowledge: how to get it, who has got it (and who hasn't), what kinds are important and its role in their conflict with management.

  • 5.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Training for Clinic-Centered Innovation: The Swedish example of Clinical-Innovation Fellowship2010In: Handbook of innovation driven research education: Volume 1, an introduction / [ed] Holst, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
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