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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Provoking identities: Entrepreneurship and emerging identity positions in rural development2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 76-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses entrepreneurship in a depleted community in transition. The purpose is to develop knowledge about how discourses are used in the positioning of identity in regional development. The concept positioning illustrates how identities are provoked, challenged, negotiated and moved into identity positions that break away from the idea of imitating successful and wealthy regions; instead, locality, place and history emerge as important resources from where local actors obtain agency and recognize new opportunities. Ethnographic data of a single case were collected over a six-year period between 2005 and 2010. The longitudinal nature of the study made it possible to incorporate how local stakeholders took on new identity positions, while handling their inspiration as well as their frustration. Results show how rural change was conditioned by discourses and how entrepreneurship challenged and reframed dominating structures through interaction between entrepreneurship and community. Four discourses, expressed as dichotomies available to people in this depleted community, illustrate the interactive process of positioning: change vs. traditions, rational vs. irrational, spectacular vs. mundane and individual vs. collective. The results support research emphasizing perspectives that acknowledge interaction between entrepreneurship and context as well as discursive aspects of regional development.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Practicing otherness: Recapturing space of action through identity construction processes2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The entrepreneur as productive, un-productive and constructive2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Consumption of entrepreneurs, consumption of entrepreneurship: Bloggers, influencers and socialites in a post-feminist economy2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the neoliberal turn, discourses on the ‘the women entrepreneur’ who starts up and manages her own company, has been stretched to include ‘the entrepreneurial women’, who affirms already achieved gender equality and thus find feminist activism less necessary to pursue (McRobbie, 2004; Gill, 2007). Entrepreneurship emphasis onindividualism, choice, and empowerment offers women postfeminist subject positions (Lewis, 2014). Wo/men’s independence has turned into an entrepreneurial class achievement (Gill, 2014), which is attained through consumption and a critical gaze on the self (Tasker & Negra, 2007). It has been reported that women’s magazines have dropped feminist content and nowadays offer women space for both self-revaluation and self-actualization (McRobbie, 2004, 2009, 2011, HolmerNadesan& Trethewey, 2000; Bröckling, 2010) Boundaries become blurred, including the male/female division, whilst the autonomous male subject of liberal polity (‘the economic man’) is turned into an invisible template (Hekman2004).  

    In this paper, we study this emerging terrain by turning to popular bloggers’ sites asking what kind of subject positions that are promoted. Our empirical data consist of blog posts, podcasts, social media interactions and interviews with a number of professional Swedish bloggers/influencers/entrepreneurs, both male and female. 

    What is common for all these entrepreneurs is that they have built up thriving and multi-faceted businesses around their personas – centering on a constant sharing of their personal lives in combination with positioning themselves as socialites and experts on matters such as fashion, interior decoration, media trends, travel – and entrepreneurship. The base – usually a blog site or a weekly podcast – has been expanded by all sorts of other activities; e.g., book publishing, TV shows, stage performances, beauty products, clothing lines and magazines.

    Feminism is an integrated part of all this, but in a ‘girlpower-ish’ sense where women can be independent and successful by their own making. In one sense, their subject positioning signifies a departure from the ethos of usefulness and discipline of classic neoliberalism (cfBerglund et al, 2017); they are to be admired because of their consumption, they are to be consumed themselves as signifiers of effectiveness, success, style and family happiness. But they are also avid promoters of classic entrepreneurial virtues; their lifestyles are within reach if you work hard, consume the right products and services, care for your career and your family at the same time. It is subject positions void of structural aspects of society (such as class), void of political conflict and void of problematisationof consumption in relation to sustainability issues.

    Our empirical examples are clearly related to recent claims that the neoliberal turn have unearthed the entrepreneurial “active, freely choosing, self-reinventing subject of postfeminism”(Gill and Scharff, 2011, p. 7). This subject may however take different shapes whereby it is more suitable to talk about how entrepreneurship discourses underpin a reconfiguration of femininity, thus offering women a variety of ‘outfits’. What these subjects share, except expecting undisputed economic freedom, is the wish (or need) to continuously self-actualise and transform, take responsibility, exercise (often conflicting) choices, in a world without radical or upsetting politics (Lewis et al, 2017). The entrepreneurial subject of neoliberalism and the self-fashioning postfeminist subject breed each other.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fostering the enterprising self: Gendered notions of entrepreneurship in Swedish school education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Responsibilising the next generation: Fostering the enterprising self through de-mobilising gender2017In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 892-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, our interest is in what subjectivities are fostered among schoolchildren through the recent introduction of entrepreneurship initiatives in primary and secondary school. The educational terrain is but one example where entrepreneurship has been discursively transformed during recent decades from the notion of starting businesses into a general approach to life itself in the advancement of neoliberal societies. The inherently elitist and excluding position of the entrepreneurial subject is now offered to all and sundry. While entrepreneurship pedagogy is explicitly intended to be gender neutral and inclusive of all such identities traditionally suppressed in the entrepreneurship discourse, we ask what kind of enterprising selves are mobilised and de-mobilised here. Second, in what way are these seemingly ‘gender-neutral’ enterprising selves gendered? Our analysis of three recent and dominating entrepreneurial initiatives in the Swedish school system emphasises the need for activation, performativity and responsibility. The analysis also shows that gender is indeed silenced in these initiatives but is at the same time productive through being subtly present in the promotion of a ‘neo-masculine’, active, technology-oriented and responsible subject. Entrepreneurship is presented as being equally available for all and something everyone should aspire to, yet the initiatives still sustain the suppression and marginalisation of women and femininities. The initiatives specifically promote a responsible and adaptive masculine subject position while notions of rebellious entrepreneurship and non-entrepreneurial domestic positions are mobilised out of the picture.

  • 7.
    Case, Peter
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Cicmil, SvetlanaUniversity of the West of England.Hodgson, DamianManchester Business School.Lindgren, MonicaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).Packendorff, JohannKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Proceedings of the 5th Making Projects Critical workshop2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Hodgson, Damian
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Project management behind the facade2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 78-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Can a 'projectified' society be a 'sustainable' society: A juncture of two logics or a contradiction in terms?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The project (management) discourse and its consequences: On vulnerability and un-sustainability in project-based work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine how the discourses related to project-based work and management are drawn upon in the organising of contemporary work, and the implications they have for project workers. We are interested in how project workers and projectified organisations become vulnerable to decline, decay and exhaustion and why they continue to participate in, and so sustain, projectification processes. The critical perspective taken here, in combination with our empirical material from the ICT sector, surfaces an irreversible decline of the coping capacity of project workers and draws attention to the addictive perception of resilience imposed on and internalised by them as a condition of success and longevity. Under those circumstances, resilience is made sense of and internalised as coping with vulnerability by letting some elements of life being destroyed; thus re-emerging as existentially vulnerable rather than avoiding or resisting the structures and processes that perpetuate vulnerability.

  • 11.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Vulnerable projectification2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms2015In: International Journal of Public Leadership, ISSN 2056-4929, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of leadership culture and analyse how leadership cultures are produced in higher education reforms, in a hybridised discursive context of traditional academic values and emerging managerialism and leaderism.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Building on a perspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in processes in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources are invoked, this study adds to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involved in the transformation of higher education organisations. To this end, the method combines a traditional qualitative study of change initiatives over a long period of time with participative observation. Focusing on two vignettes, the analysis centres on how several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction.

    Findings

    The emergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction is illustrated. This paper emphasises how hybrid cultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursive influences.

    Research limitations/implications

    An extended empirical material would enable further understanding of what cultural constructions of leadership that become confirmed, re-formulated or rejected. International comparisons would also enrich the analysis.

    Practical implications

    This paper may influence leadership, leadership development and change initiatives in higher education organization.

    Originality/value

    The perspective proposed builds on recent developments in leadership studies and expands the means for focusing on social processes rather than individuals.

  • 13.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures in transition: On the cultural construction of leadership in university change processes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary organizational research, the development of leadership norms andideal in public sector reform has been a recurring theme. The current changeprocesses in the higher education sector is in this paper analysed as the changes inleadership cultures, i.e. as processes in which discursive understandings ofleadership are drawn upon in the construction of norms, ideals and practices relatedto the production of organisational direction. The aim of this paper is thus to analyseleadership cultures under production in the reforms of higher education, in adiscursive context of increased managerialism and leaderism. Building on aperspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in interactionprocesses in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources areinvoked, we intend to add to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involvedin the transformation of higher education organisations. This perspective does notonly allow a more fine-grained analysis of how these transformations unfold –involving not only clear discursive clashes but also instances of hybrid cultures andcreeping changes in the discursive resources drawn upon – but also a criticalanalysis of changed power relations as ‘truths’ on professionalism and leadership aregradually re-formulated. Departing from two vignettes from sessions with juniortenure track participants at a Swedish university, our analysis centres on theemergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources aredrawn upon in daily interaction. Where earlier research often tends to handle therelation between traditional academic/bureaucratic discourses and emergentmanagerialist/leaderist ones as a clear and distinct shift, we emphasise how hybridcultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursiveinfluences.

  • 14.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entrepreneurship, gender and profession: A research agenda2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Articulating the performativity of leadership: Opening up for re-constructing leadership in order to change its practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Leadership as a collective construction: Re-conceptualizing leadership in knowledge-intensive firms2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Leadership, not leaders: On the study of leadership as practices and interactions2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we suggest a perspective within leadership research that has an analytical focus on leadership as it is practiced in daily interaction, rather than on individual leaders. We draw upon recent developments in leadership research that emphasize leadership as processes, practices and interactions in formulating basic scientific assumptions of such a perspective. The suggested perspective will enable us to gain new understandings of how leadership activities emerge in social interaction and of how institutionalized notions of leadership are brought into and re-constructed in these same activities. Given this reasoning, we would suggest that the empirical study of leadership should be based in a process ontology, focused on leadership practices as constructed in interactions.

  • 18.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Leadership virtues and management knowledge: Questioning the unitary command perspective in leadership research2007In: Moral foundations of management knowledge / [ed] M-L. Djelic & R. Vranceanu, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ledarskap bortom idén om den ensamma hjälten2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Martin Kreuger, Lucia Crevani, Kristina Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013, 1, p. 43-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Otaliga teorier har försökt beskriva det optimala ledarskapet. Men i regel lämnar de ändå en utgångspunkt orörd, nämligen föreställningen om att den goda ledaren är en enskild person med särskilda utförsgåvor. Denna heroiska grundsyn på chefskapet stämmer illa med verkligheten och leder tanken fel. Det är därför hög tid att överge hjältemytenoch i stället betrakta ledarskapet som en gemensam process där alla aktörer bidrar med olika grad av medledarskap, skriver Lucia Crevani, Monica Lindgren och Johann Packendorff vid KTH.

  • 20.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Shared leadership: A post-heroic perspective on leadership as a collective construction2007In: International Journal of Leadership Studies, ISSN 1554-3145, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 40-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of leadership practices, there is an emergent movement towards viewing leadership in terms of collaboration between two or more persons. At the same time, traditional literature on leadership and organization theory has been dominated almost exclusively by the perspective that leadership is something that is exercised by a single person—the idea of unitary command (Pearce & Manz, 2005). This has been challenged by the theoretical perspective of postheroic leadership, of which one practical consequence is to view leadership activities as collective rather than individual. In this paper, we argue that by shifting perspective from viewing leadership as a single-person activity to viewing it as collective construction processes, we will see new patterns in how leadership is exercised in practice. Thematic data from four qualitative case studies of organizations are presented. A discussion towards future research agendas where the articulation and questioning of the foundations of leadership practices and leadership research are central to the development of postheroic leadership ideals concludes the paper.

  • 21.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sustainable Leadership and Management Knowledge:: On collective constructions of leadership2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Towards process studies of project leadership2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we draw on current research in the general field of leadership studies in order to suggest that process per-spectives are relevant and rewarding for inquiry into project leadership. Departing from a process ontology we argue that project leadership can be studied as series of social activities and events in which actors, projects and organizational contexts are all in constant an mutually interacting flux, rather than as traits, styles and competences of individual project managers. From such a per-spective, project leadership is seen as the ongoing social production of direction through construction and re-construction of actors’ space of action. This involves processes of continuous construction and reconstruction of (1) past project activities and events, (2) positions and areas of responsibility related to the project, (3) discarded, ongoing and future issues to be dealt with in the project, and (4) temporal rhythm and pace. Drawing on an in-depth ethnographic case study of an organizational change project, we show how the space of action and hence the direction of the project is in constant flux and becoming.

  • 23.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    We don’t need another hero: Towards the study of leadership as everyday practices2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all theories of management and organization, leadership has a given central place in enforcing principles, motivating employees and communicating future goals and visions to strive for. Leadership is assumed to make a special, significant and positive contribution to action processes in most organizations, and leadership studies as an academic field has thus been preoccupied with the task of identifying the most successful leadership practices. At the same time, the field of leadership studies has traditionally been leader-centered, i.e. focused on the individual leader and his/hers traits, abilities and actions. Leadership practices have been equated with leaders’ practices, dichotomously separated from those of the ‘others’ in this tradition, the ‘followers’. The aim of this paper is to put forward an alternative perspective, based on the idea that leadership is a natural part of what most people do on an everyday basis in organisations. From this perspective, leadership is a set of social practices organised by people in interaction, practices related to intentional processes of organisational change and development. Empirical data from recent case studies will be used to illustrate the tenets of this alternative perspective

  • 24.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Gendered recognition practices and the perpetuation of vulnerability: A study in Swedish universities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current critical research on work life in the higher education sector, analyses often revolve around neoliberal managerialism as contrasted to traditional professional academic values (cf. Henkel, 1997; Deem, 2004; Ekman et al, 2017). Academics are both faced with expectations to uphold the integrity of academic values in their research and teaching, whilst at the same time performing and ’careering’ in accordance with managerialist reforms (Clarke & Knights, 2015).

    Knights & Clarke (2014) analyse insecurity as a central aspect of identity in academics, conceptualizing academic life as a ‘bittersweet symphony’ populated by imposters (self- doubt and low self-esteem despite adequate performance), aspirants (under-recognised in relation to their inner sense of excellence) and existentialists (questioning the meaning of work and maintaining a sense of anxiety over their contributions to wider society). Another example is provided by Bristow et al (2017) who identify how early career-academics within CMS play on three narratives – diplomatic, combative and idealistic – by which they both resist and reproduce the ethos of business school neoliberalism in which they are embedded. Academics’ identity construction thus in different ways tend to position them as vulnerable selves (Cicmil et al, 2016), that is, as existentially exposed to the risks associated with projectified careers, macho-style management and a high degree of self-responsibility (Loveday, 2018).

    In addition, a number of earlier studies has also pointed out the highly gendered nature of how academic work is organized, how recruitment and promotion processes unfold etc. (cf. (cf. Hush, 2001; Mählck, 2003; van den Brink & Benschop, 2012).

    In this study we will focus on recognition practices (how recognition repeatedly tend to happen or not happen in local/cultural contexts, and thus also become the expectation on what may happen in future interactions) and their consequences for identity construction

    1

    and sense of vulnerability thus seem central to advance the above insights. Recognition practices thus involve not only what and whom is recognized or not for something, but also in what settings certain practices are legitimate or not, and how they are publicly displayed in social interaction.

    We suggest that

    • recognition practices are an important yet under-researched aspect of academic

      identity construction processes

    • recognition practices are gendered, i.e. we perform gender in our ways of

      - conferring and receiving recognition,- constructing what recognition may mean in different local/cultural contexts, - constructing when it is to be conferred/received or not,- constructing how it is appropriately played out how in social interaction.

    • recognition practices tend to sustain vulnerability among academics, but in different ways for men and women.

  • 25.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fragmented meritocratisation: On mobilisation and demobilisation of gender in higher education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Universities need leadership, academics need management: discursive tensions and voids in the deregulation of Swedish higher education legislation2018In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 299-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inthisarticle,wediscusshow‘managerialist’and‘leaderist’discourses(O’Reillyand Reed Public Administration 88:960–978, 2010; Organization Studies 32:1079–1101, 2011) are drawn upon in the context of the deregulation of Swedish higher education. As of 2011, there has been new legislation that frames Swedish universities as ‘autonomous’ and transfers most of the regulative responsibilities from the government level to university vice-chancellors. The aim of this article is to inquire into how tensions within and between managerialist and leaderist discourse are handled in the promotion of New Public Management reforms and the conse- quences thereof in terms of how leadership in the higher education sector is constructed. We analyse how these discourses are employed in the core documents leading up to the 2010 Riksdag decision to enact most of the proposed deregulations, and the subsequent evaluation undertaken by the social democratic government that took over in 2014. Based in this analysis, we suggest that the texts indeed draw upon notions of leadership and leaders as necessary for Swedish universities to survive and thrive in the future, but that the envisaged practise of this ‘strong leadership’ can either be characterised as a discursive void or described in terms of de- personalised, instrumental managerial surveillance and control. 

  • 27.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Hur vill vi ha det?: Varje dag2011In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 10-11, p. 27-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Leadership as panacea in the quest for the autonomous university?: A discursive analysis of notions of leadership in the deregulation of the Swedish university legislation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ford, Jackie
    et al.
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Cunliffe, Ann L
    Anderson School of Management, University of New Mexico.
    Raelin, Joseph A
    Northeastern University .
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Harding, Nancy
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Critical approaches to leadership learning and development2012In: CMS Division Showcase Symposion, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Countless managers in the USA, UK and other countries are embarking on leadership learning and development activities to support their roles and identities as leaders (Day, 2011; Storey, 2011).  There is a belief that the deluge of publications and the investment in leadership development will create managers with the skills and characters of leaders, capable of guiding organizations through the crises of the 21st century global market. Such learning and development programs frequently espouse the value of dominant discourses such as transformational leadership, with its ‘heroic’ assumptions that romanticize individual leaders and underestimate the significance of context and relationships. Furthermore, they often neglect critical engagement with the complex conditions, processes and consequences of leadership dynamics in contemporary organizations. Recently, critical (and especially poststructural) approaches to researching and conceptualizing leadership have emerged, which although still being outnumbered by mainstream accounts (Ford, 2006; Ford, Harding and Learmonth, 2008; Jackson and Parry, 2011), are increasingly influential. However, discourses emerging from the more critical approaches have not yet had time to be absorbed into leadership learning and development activities. This symposium brings together critical leadership theorists who will explore ways of changing leadership pedagogy.

  • 30.
    Gillberg, Nanna
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Hvenmark, Johan
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Höök, Pia
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Tempered radicals under attack: Faculty's experiences of encouraging critical reflection in business school education2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    Hogdson, Damian
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Making Projects Critical 9: Call for Papers2018Other (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Canonico, Paolo
    University of Naples.
    Case, Peter
    University of the West of England.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    De Nito, Ernesto
    Università degli Studi "Magna Græcia" di Catanzaro.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    All on a promise: Critical studies of projects and project management: Call for papers2010Other (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hodgson, Damian E
    et al.
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work: Special issue call for papers in New Technology, Work and Employment2014Other (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Holmquist, Carin
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Why opposites attract: On the problems of dichotomisation in research2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Bridging the gender gap in entrepreneurship: A study of a Quadruple helix innovation system project in the Baltic Sea region2011In: 1st International Conference on Entrepreneurship, Innovation and SMEs, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Bridging the gender gap in entrepreneurship through NGO’s: A study of a Quadruple Helix innovation system project in the Baltic Sea region2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A gender gap in entrepreneurship and innovation can be discerned across Europe – often portrayed as a statistical pattern showing differences in prevalence of entrepreneurial and innovative activities between the categories of men and women. The gender gap can be traced back to the general perceptions of gender in society, where entrepreneurial venturing and innovation work are culturally defined as masculine activities. A situation in which dominating policy models for regional entrepreneurship and innovation – such as the Triple Helix model – sustain the gender gap by being blind to gender issues imply both practical and theoretical challenges for critical management research. In this paper, we intend to analyse the gendered norms and consequences of dominating innovation models, such as the Triple Helix, and to identify roles and challenges of NGO’s in the alternative conceptualization of Quadruple Helix.

    Based on an exploratory case study of an EU-financed project intentionally set up as a Quadruple Helix innovation system, we find that NGOs may fill four roles in bridging the gender gap: (1) collaborative platforms for women-led SMEs, (2) legitimating and linking women-led SMEs to governmental and academic actors, (3) developing competences and process innovations related to entrepreneurial venturing outside traditional Triple Helix constellations, and (4) carrying individual and societal aspects of entrepreneuring

  • 38.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Quadruple Helix as a way to bridge the gender gap in entrepreneurship: A case study of an innovation system project in the Baltic Sea region2014In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 94-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most developed economies there exist a clear gap between men and women in terms of prevalence of entrepreneurial activity. The gender gap can be traced back to the general perceptions of gender in society, where entrepreneurial venturing is culturally defined as a masculine activity. In this paper, we analyse how such gendered norms are brought into Triple Helix innovation system models, and identify roles and challenges of NGOs in the alternative conceptualization of Quadruple Helix. Based on an exploratory case study of a Quadruple Helix innovation system project in the tourism industry, we find that NGOs may fill four roles in bridging the gender gap: (1) collaborative platforms for women-led SMEs, (2) legitimating and linking women-led SMEs to governmental and academic actors, (3) developing competences and process innovations related to entrepreneurial venturing outside traditional Triple Helix constellations and (4) carrying individual and societal aspects of entrepreneuring.

  • 39.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The role of NGOs in supporting women’s entrepreneurship: a study of a Quadruple Helix project in the Baltic sea region2010Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The role of NGO’s in supporting women’s entrepreneurship: A study of Quadruple Helix innovation systems in the Baltic sea region2011In: 7th International Critical Management Studies Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A gender gap in entrepreneurship and innovation can be discerned across Europe – often portrayed as a statistical pattern showing differences in prevalence of entrepreneurial and innovative activities between the categories of men and women. The gender gap can be traced back to the general perceptions of gender in society, where entrepreneurial venturing and innovation work are culturally defined as masculine activities. A situation in which dominating policy models for regional entrepreneurship and innovation – such as the Triple Helix model – sustain the gender gap by being blind to gender issues imply both practical and theoretical challenges for critical management research. In this paper, we intend to analyse the gendered norms and consequences of dominating innovation models, such as the Triple Helix, and to identify roles and challenges of NGO’s in the alternative conceptualization of Quadruple Helix.

    Based on an exploratory case study of an EU--‐financed project intentionally set up as a Quadruple Helixinnovation system, we find that NGOs may fill four roles in bridging the gender gap: (1) collaborative platforms for women--‐led SMEs, (2) legitimating and linking women--‐led SMEs to governmental and academic actors, (3) developing competences and process innovations related to entrepreneurial venturing outside traditional Triple Helix constellations, and (4) carrying individual and societal aspects of entrepreneuring.

  • 41.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gränsöverskridande entreprenörskapsforskning: Entreprenörskap som projekt, process och emancipation2009In: Entreprenörskap på riktigt: Teoretiska och praktiska perspektiv / [ed] Carin Holmquist, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 215-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Umeå School of Business.
    Kvinnliga entreprenörer i friskolan: Om entreprenörskap och profession i skapandet av identitet2001In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 32-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Maskulint, feminint, entreprenöriellt: Könsstämpling av branscher och professioner2008In: Sesam, öppna dig!: Forskarperpektiv på kvinnors företagande / [ed] P. Larsson, U. Göranson & M. Lagerholm, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2008, p. 53-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Projektbaserat arbete ur ett livsformsperspektiv2011In: Bonniers ledarskapshandböcker: Projektledning / [ed] Johnny Tedenfors, Stockholm: Bonnier , 2011, p. 5: 1-5: 38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    A framework for the integration of a gender perspective in cross-borderentrepreneurship and cluster promotion programmes2010Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    A project-based view of entrepreneurship: Towards action-orientation, seriality and collectivity2003In: New movements of entrepreneurship / [ed] C. Steyaert & D. Hjorth, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2003, 1, p. 86-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional entrepreneurship research often tends to view entrepreneurship in terms of individual actors starting enterprises, an approach which might limit further development of entrepreneurship theory. The project-based view of entrepreneurship proposed here instead focuses on the organising of entrepreneurial acts (action-orientation). Such entrepreneurial acts can be, but are not limited to, enterprise start-ups – entrepreneurship also happens in many other forms. Moreover, those acts are temporary by nature, which means that they can be analysed in terms of projects. Saying that entrepreneurial acts are temporary projects means that people can perform several entrepreneurial acts during a lifetime – in different ways and with different results (seriality). Entrepreneurial acts are also viewed as collective ones, organised by several actors in actor networks temporarily coupled together by a somewhat common mission (collectivity). From this reasoning, it also follows that empirical investigation of project-based entrepreneurship should be made with a narrative approach, understanding the entrepreneurial act as a part of the various actors’ construction of identity. With respect to every actor’s - socially constructed - view of reality we therefore can understand the social construction of the entrepreneurial act. By stressing a project-based view with a social constructionist perspective we hope to encourage pluralism and diversity in theory, practice and methodology.

  • 47.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Caught in the act?: On co-construction of project work and professional identities in theatres2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies point at that the notion of working in a project brings with it expectations on several aspects of the work situation, expectations that are institutionally given by project theory and practice and re-constructed by the project workers in interaction. At the same time, working by projects and re-constructing organisational and institutional norms on how projects should be, they also successively constructed an image of themselves in relation to these norms. This points at that not only are individuals reinforcing established notions on project work while working by projects – they also at the same time construct their own identities, reinforcing notions about themselves as professional, committed and structured enough to endure the hardships of project work. In other words, a project is here seen as a process of co-construction of the project form and of project worker professional identity. In this paper, we will thus analyse how people in project-based operations socially construct projects and individual identities – i.e. what happens when something is labelled a project and/or a project-based firm.

    The analysis of the interviews from two theatres indicates that projects and project-based operations are co-constructed with individual identities in several ways simultaneously,  hrough discourses that may look internally consistent but not always easy to combine with each other. Even though most producers, directors and stage managers at the two theatres are most familiar with Gantt charts, project goal structures etc, they are not actively promoting Project Management as a distinct competence of neither themselves nor the organization. What they do promote is still a modernist notion of professionalism that is closely linked to the project form of work organization. What is co-constructed is a system of inter-subjectively held beliefs linking organizational poverty, legitimacy and success to individual identification with what are highstandard artistry, organizational loyalty and self-fulfilment. The single projects become arenas and critical incidents for such co-construction, for yet another confirmation of the current development or for experimenting with other forms for theatre production project work.

  • 48.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Deconstructing project prisons: Towards critical perspectives on project theory and projecticised society2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Deconstructing Projects: Towards Critical Perspectives on Project Theory and Projecticised Society2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entrepreneurship and power: Applying power perspectives in the analysis of collective entrepreneurial processes2005Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 91
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