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  • 1. Brand, Ralf
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    The ecosystem of expertise: complementary knowledges for sustainable development2007In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 3, no 1, 21-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically examines the approach of technical experts, including engineers, natural scientists, architects, planners, and other practitioners, who are attempting to create more sustainable forms of economic development, environmental protection, and social equity. The authors identify four principal characteristics of expertise–ontological assumptions, epistemological approaches, power inequalities, and practical issues–and employ this framework to test the capability of traditional experts to deliver sustainable development. The authors then provide four alternatives to conventional forms of expertise: the outreach expert who communicates effectively to non-experts, the interdisciplinary expert who understands the overlaps of neighboring technical disciplines, the meta-expert who brokers the multiple claims of relevance between different forms of expertise, and the civic expert who engages in democratic discourse with non-experts and experts alike. All of these alternative forms are needed to manage the often-competing demands of sustainable development projects and they can be described collectively as an “ecosystem of expertise.”

  • 2. Evans, James
    et al.
    Jones, Ross
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Millard, Lucy
    Wendler, Jana
    Living labs and co-production: university campuses as platforms for sustainability science2015In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 16, 1-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Evans, James
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    'Give Me a Laboratory and I Will Lower Your Carbon Footprint!' - Urban Laboratories and the Governance of Low-Carbon Futures2014In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 2, 413-430 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing threat of climate change has created a pressing need for cities to lower their carbon footprints. Urban laboratories are emerging in numerous cities around the world as a strategy for local governments to partner with public and private property owners to reduce carbon emissions, while simultaneously stimulating economic growth. In this article, we use insights from laboratory studies to analyse the notion of urban laboratories as they relate to experimental governance, the carbonization agenda and the transition to low-carbon economies. We present a case study of the Oxford Road corridor in Manchester in the UK that is emerging as a low-carbon urban laboratory, with important policy implications for the city's future. The corridor is a bounded space where a public-private partnership comprised of the City Council, two universities and other large property owners is redeveloping the physical infrastructure and installing monitoring equipment to create a recursive feedback loop intended to facilitate adaptive learning. This low-carbon urban laboratory represents a classic sustainable development formula for coupling environmental protection with economic growth, using innovation and partnership as principal drivers. However, it also has significant implications in reworking the interplay of knowledge production and local governance, while reinforcing spatial differentiation and uneven participation in urban development.

  • 4. Evans, James
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Living laboratories for sustainability: exploring the politics and epistemology of urban transition2011In: Cities and Low Carbon Transitions / [ed] Harriet Bulkeley, Vanesa Castán Broto, Mike Hodson, and Simon Marvin, London: Routledge , 2011, Vol. 35, 130-140 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5. Evans, James
    et al.
    Karvonen, AndrewRaven, Rob
    The Experimental City2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6. Evans, James
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Raven, Rob
    The experimental city: new modes and prospects of urban transformation2016In: The Experimental City / [ed] James Evans, Andrew Karvonen, Rob Raven, London: Routledge , 2016, 1-12 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7. Grandclement, Catherine
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Guy, Simon
    Negotiating comfort in low energy housing: The politics of intermediation2015In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 84, 213-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimising the energy performance of buildings is technically and economically challenging but it also has significant social implications. Maintaining comfortable indoor conditions while reducing energy consumption involves careful design, construction, and management of the built environment and its inhabitants. In this paper, we present findings from the study of a new low energy building for older people in Grenoble, France where conflicts emerged over the simultaneous pursuit of energy efficiency and comfort. The findings contribute to the contemporary literature on the sociotechnical study of buildings and energy use by focusing on intermediation, those activities that associate a technology to end users. Intermediation activities take many forms, and in some cases, can result in the harmonisation or alignment of energy efficiency goals and comfort goals. In other cases, intermediation is unsuccessful, leading to the conventional dichotomy between optimising technical performance and meeting occupant preferences. By highlighting the multiple ways that comfort and energy efficiency is negotiated, we conclude that buildings are provisional achievements that are constantly being intermediated. This suggests that building energy efficiency policies and programmes need to provide opportunities for intermediaries to negotiate the desires and preferences of the multiple stakeholders that are implicated in low energy buildings.

  • 8. Guy, Simon
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    District heating comes to Ecotown: zero-carbon housing and the rescaling of UK energy provision2016In: Beyond the Networked City: Infrastructure Reconfigurations and Urban Change in the North and South / [ed] Olivier Coutard, Jonathan Rutherford, London: Routledge , 2016, 72-93 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9. Guy, Simon
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Using sociotechnical methods: researching human-technological dynamics in the city2011In: Understanding Social Research: Thinking Creatively about Method / [ed] Jennifer Mason,Angela Dale, London: Sage Publications, 2011, 120-133 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Guy, Simon
    et al.
    Lewis, Alan
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Conditioning demand: Older people, thermal comfort and low-carbon housing2015In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 84, 191-194 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Afterword: planning and the non-modern city2018In: Relational Planning: Tracing Artefacts, Agency and Practices / [ed] M. Kurath, M. Marskamp, J. Paulos and J. Ruegg, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, 317-325 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: Design on the Edge: The Making of a High-Performance Building by David W. Orr2008In: Environmental Ethics, ISSN 0163-4275, E-ISSN 2153-7895, Vol. 30, 105-106 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book Review: Design on the Edge: The Making of a High-Performance Building by David Orr2008In: Environmental Ethics, ISSN 0163-4275, E-ISSN 2153-7895, Vol. 30, no 1, 105-106 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Book review: Eco-Cities and the Transition to Low Carbon Economies by Federico Caprotti2015In: LSE Review of BooksArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 15. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge edited by Lisa H. Sideris and Kathleen Dean Moore2009In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: Social Power and the Urbanization of Water: Flows of Power by Erik Swyngedouw2005In: Planning Forum, Vol. 11, 91-92 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: The Greening of Architecture: A Critical History and Survey of Contemporary Sustainable Architecture and Urban Design by Phillip James Tabb and A. Senem Deviren2014In: LSE Review of BooksArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 18. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: The New Science of Cities by Michael Batty2014In: LSE Review of BooksArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Book Review:: The Politics of Evidence: From Evidence-Based Policy to the Good Governance of Evidence by Justin Parkhurst2017In: LSE Review of BooksArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 20. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book Review: The SAGE Handbook of Architectural Theory2014In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 38, no 4, 624-625 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book Review: Toward the Healthy City: People, Places, and The Politics of Urban Planning by Jason Corburn2011In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 35, no 2, 469-470 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: Unbuilding Cities: Obduracy in Urban Sociotechnical Change by Anique Hommels2006In: Planning Forum, Vol. 12, 122-125 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23. Karvonen, Andrew
    Book review: Urban Assemblages: How Actor-Network Theory Changes Urban Studies edited by Ignacio Farías and Thomas Bender2011In: Space and CultureArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Botanizing the Asphalt: Politics of Urban Drainage2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 25. Karvonen, Andrew
    Cation effects on chromium removal in permeable reactive walls2004In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 130, no 8, 863-866 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Permeable reactive walls have proven to be successful in laboratory and pilot-scale field applications. However, the long-term efficacy of reactive permeable walls has not been established due to the novelty of the technology. Also, the impact of common groundwater ions such as calcium and magnesium (i.e., hardness) on permeable reactive walls is unknown. In theory, the ions may react competitively with chromium in solution and/or other materials on the surface of the zero-valent iron. The ions may also form precipitates that could clog the reactive zone over time, resulting in decreased contaminant removal and a shorter wall lifetime. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of common groundwater ions on permeable reactive walls. A range of calcium and magnesium concentrations was tested in laboratory columns to determine the effect of these ions on removal of a constant chromium concentration (100 mg/L). Results from the laboratory tests indicated that calcium and magnesium had a significant impact on chromium removal. The most dramatic effects were witnessed at hardness levels up to 140 mg/L as CaCO3 where zero-valent iron capacity was reduced by 45%.

  • 26.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Community housing retrofit in the UK and the civics of energy consumption2018In: Retrofitting Cities for Tomorrow’s World / [ed] M. Eames, T. Dixon, M. Hunt, and S. Lannon, London: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018, 19-32 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    From bioregions to heterotopias: alternative pathways to territorialising the environment2017In: Territorial Policy and Governance: Alternative Paths / [ed] I. Deas, S. Hincks, London: Routledge, 2017, 165-184 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Low-carbon devices and desires in community housing retrofit2016In: Towards a Cultural Politics of Climate Change: Devices, Desires and Dissent / [ed] Harriet Bulkeley,Matthew Paterson, Johannes Stripple, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2016, 51-65 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Matthew Gandy2017In: Key Thinkers on Cities / [ed] R. Koch and A. Latham, London: Sage Publications, 2017, 87-92 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30. Karvonen, Andrew
    Metronatural (TM): Inventing and reworking urban nature in Seattle2010In: Progress in Planning, ISSN 0305-9006, E-ISSN 1873-4510, Vol. 74, 153-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seattle has long been considered a city in harmony with nature, a metropolis inseparable from and infused with the dramatic and picturesque Pacific Northwest landscape. Today, the city is frequently cited as a leader in sustainable urban development and this is due in large part to its unique relationship with its natural surroundings. However, the historical record of Seattle reveals this harmonious relationship between humans and nature to be a social construction. The founders of Seattle adopted an urban development approach similar to other North American cities and implemented large-scale engineering projects to rationalise the landscape while solidifying the municipal government as the ultimate arbiter of human/nature relations. The unintended economic, environmental, and social consequences of this so-called 'Promethean' approach to urban nature would be debunked in the 1950s, catalyzing a wide array of approaches by the municipality and residents to restore, protect, and live with nature in more benign ways. In this article, I examine the politics of nature in Seattle to understand how changing perceptions of the urban landscape are related to different forms of expertise, governance, and citizenship. I focus specifically on activities to reorient urban water flows because they reveal the multiple tensions between humans and nature. The article adds to contemporary scholarship in landscape architecture, human geography, and environmental history on the dilemma of urban nature while highlighting the central role of technical experts, practices, and networks as well as issues of governance, citizenship, and management. Seattle's reputation as a green metropolis serves as an entry point to interpret the various relationships between humans, technology, and nature while also suggesting potential routes to realise more sustainable urban futures.

  • 31.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Pathways of urban nature: Diversity in the Greening of the Twenty-First-Century City2015In: Now Urbanism: The Future City is Here / [ed] Jeff Hou, Ben Spencer, Thaisa Way, and Ken Yocom, London: Routledge , 2015, 274-286 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. Karvonen, Andrew
    Politics of Urban Runoff: Nature, Technology, and the Sustainable City2011Book (Refereed)
  • 33. Karvonen, Andrew
    Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge2009In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 50, no 4, 924-926 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The politics of green transformations2017In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 22, no 7, 904-906 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35. Karvonen, Andrew
    Towards systemic domestic retrofit: a social practices approach2013In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 41, no 5, 563-574 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UK housing stock will play an important role in achieving the 2050 national carbon reduction targets. Upgrading the energy performance of the existing housing stock is a significant challenge because retrofit activities are shaped by a wide range of fragmented policies, programmes and actors. Existing approaches to housing retrofit focus on regulations, financial incentives and information provision, but it is argued these are insufficient to realize large-scale, deep changes in energy consumption. An agenda is proposed for systemic domestic retrofit to realize radical changes in the housing stock through community-based partnerships. These programmes are based on a social practices approach that promotes social innovation. Wide-ranging energy-efficiency upgrades can be achieved through the development and realization of customized solutions to local groups of houses through facilitated engagement between occupants, housing providers, community groups, local authorities and construction professionals. Community-based domestic retrofit programmes serve to reframe the governance of household energy performance and suggest alternative routes for realizing significant reductions in energy demand through changes in the socio-technical configuration of materials, competences and images of domestic energy practices.

  • 36. Karvonen, Andrew
    Towards systemic retrofit: a social practices approach2013In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 41, no 5, 563-574 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UK housing stock will play an important role in achieving the 2050 national carbon reduction targets. Upgrading the energy performance of the existing housing stock is a significant challenge because retrofit activities are shaped by a wide range of fragmented policies, programmes and actors. Existing approaches to housing retrofit focus on regulations, financial incentives and information provision, but it is argued these are insufficient to realize large-scale, deep changes in energy consumption. An agenda is proposed for systemic domestic retrofit to realize radical changes in the housing stock through community-based partnerships. These programmes are based on a social practices approach that promotes social innovation. Wide-ranging energy-efficiency upgrades can be achieved through the development and realization of customized solutions to local groups of houses through facilitated engagement between occupants, housing providers, community groups, local authorities and construction professionals. Community-based domestic retrofit programmes serve to reframe the governance of household energy performance and suggest alternative routes for realizing significant reductions in energy demand through changes in the socio-technical configuration of materials, competences and images of domestic energy practices.

  • 37.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Brand, Ralf
    Expertise: Specialized knowledge in environmental politics and sustainability2014In: Routledge Handbook of Global Environmental Politics / [ed] P.G. Harris, London: Routledge , 2014, 215-230 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38. Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    Brand, Ralf
    Technical expertise, sustainability, and the politics of knowledge2011In: Environmental Governance: Power and Knowledge in a Local-Global World / [ed] Gabriela Kütting, Ronnie Lipschutz, London: Routledge , 2011, 38-59 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Evans, James
    van Heur, Bas
    The politics of urban experiments: realising radical change or reinforcing business as usual?2014In: After Sustainable Cities? / [ed] Mike Hodson, Simon Marvin, London: Routledge , 2014, 104-115 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40. Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    van Heur, Bas
    Urban Laboratories: Experiments in Reworking Cities2014In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 2, 379-392 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of the ‘urban laboratory’ is increasingly striking a chord with actors involved in urban change. Is this term simply a metaphor for urban development or does it suggest urbanization by substantially different means? To answer this question, we review the work of science and technology studies (STS) scholars who have empirically investigated laboratories and practices of experimentation over the past three decades to understand the significance of these spaces of experimentation in urban contexts. Based on this overview of laboratory studies, we argue that urban laboratories and experimentation involve three key achievements — situatedness, change-orientation and contingency — that are useful for evaluating and critiquing those practices that claim to be urban laboratories. We conclude by considering some future directions of research on urban laboratories.

  • 41. Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    van Heur, Bas
    Urban laboratories: experiments in reworking cities2014In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of the 'urban laboratory' is increasingly striking a chord with actors involved in urban change. Is this term simply a metaphor for urban development or does it suggest urbanization by substantially different means? To answer this question, we review the work of science and technology studies (STS) scholars who have empirically investigated laboratories and practices of experimentation over the past three decades to understand the significance of these spaces of experimentation in urban contexts. Based on this overview of laboratory studies, we argue that urban laboratories and experimentation involve three key achievements - situatedness, change-orientation and contingency - that are useful for evaluating and critiquing those practices that claim to be urban laboratories. We conclude by considering some future directions of research on urban laboratories.

  • 42. Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    Yocom, Ken
    The civics of urban nature: enacting hybrid landscapes2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 6, 1305-1322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban nature is typically managed through top-down, bureaucratic, and expert-driven approaches that tend to rationalize and simplify the interactions between humans and their surroundings. In the last few decades, there has been a significant push in cultural geography and the design disciplines to develop a relational ontology of urban nature, a perspective that emphasizes the hybrid connections between humans and nonhumans, built and unbuilt, social and natural. This perspective offers new and exciting ways of conceptualizing urban nature but it has not produced alternatives to conventional governance. In other words, thinking differently about urban nature has yet to produce different ways of interacting with it. In this paper we argue that civic environmentalism can enact a relational ontology by engaging urban residents in processes of democratic deliberation and action in the reworking of urban nature. We illustrate this approach with a case study of a community-led project to construct a pedestrian trail along an urban creek in Seattle, Washington. The example demonstrates how the concept of civic environmentalism embraces a relational perspective of urban nature, while also producing generative forms of political action.

  • 43. Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    Yocom, Ken
    The civics of urban nature: enacting hybrid landscapes2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 6, 1305-1322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban nature is typically managed through top-down, bureaucratic, and expert-driven approaches that tend to rationalize and simplify the interactions between humans and their surroundings. In the last few decades, there has been a significant push in cultural geography and the design disciplines to develop a relational ontology of urban nature, a perspective that emphasizes the hybrid connections between humans and nonhumans, built and unbuilt, social and natural. This perspective offers new and exciting ways of conceptualizing urban nature but it has not produced alternatives to conventional governance. In other words, thinking differently about urban nature has yet to produce different ways of interacting with it. In this paper we argue that civic environmentalism can enact a relational ontology by engaging urban residents in processes of democratic deliberation and action in the reworking of urban nature. We illustrate this approach with a case study of a community-led project to construct a pedestrian trail along an urban creek in Seattle, Washington. The example demonstrates how the concept of civic environmentalism embraces a relational perspective of urban nature, while also producing generative forms of political action.

  • 44. Karvonen, Andy
    The gentle subversive: Rachel Carson, silent spring, and the rise of the environmental movement2008In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 49, no 1, 242-244 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45. Moore, Steven A.
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    Sustainable architecture in context: STS and design thinking2008In: Science Studies, ISSN 0786-3012, Vol. 21, no 1, 29-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been little emphasis in STS scholarship to date on the design of the built environment. This paper attempts to address this oversight by examining alternative design practices in the growing field of sustainable architecture. We propose a geohistorical framework that includes three design dispositions?"context-bound, context-free, and context-rich?"and illustrate each with a prominent sustainable building practice. The principal argument of the paper is that each of these dispositions embodies distinct assumptions and attitudes about how to improve social and material conditions of the built environment, and as such, offers unique opportunities for STS scholars to shape the sociotechnical aspects of cities through intervention in design activities.

  • 46. Trencher, Gregory
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Stretching “smart”: advancing health and well-being through the smart city agenda2017In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary smart cities have largely mirrored the sustainable development agenda by embracing an ecological modernisation approach to urban development. There is a strong focus on stimulating economic activity and environmental protection with little emphasis on social equity and the human experience. The health and well-being agenda has potential to shift the focus of smart cities to centre on social aims. Through the systematic and widespread application of technologies such as wearable health monitors, the creation of open data platforms for health parameters, and the development of virtual communication between patients and health professionals, the smart city can serve as a means to improve the lives of urban residents. In this article, we present a case study of smart health in Kashiwanoha Smart City in Japan. We explore how the pursuit of greater health and well-being has stretched smart city activities beyond technological innovation to directly impact resident lifestyles and become more socially relevant. Smart health strategies examined include a combination of experiments in monitoring and visualisation, education through information provision, and enticement for behavioural change. Findings suggest that smart cities have great potential to be designed and executed to tackle social problems and realise more sustainable, equitable and liveable cities.

  • 47. Walker, Gordon
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Guy, Simon
    Reflections on a policy denouement: the politics of mainstreaming zero-carbon housing2016In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 41, no 1, 104-106 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reflect on the decision to abandon the mainstreaming of zero-carbon house building in England, in the context of our paper (Walker et al. 2015) that took this long-standing policy commitment as its case study. We consider this denouement as further evidence of how the exigencies of capital accumulation resist moves towards low-carbon transition. We reflect on what it reveals about the relation between politics and governance, the grounding and locating of carbon responsibilities and the necessary role of the state in enabling the everyday reproduction of low-carbo

  • 48. Walker, Gordon
    et al.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Guy, Simon
    Zero carbon homes and zero carbon living: sociomaterial interdependencies in carbon governance2015In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 40, no 4, 494-506 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider in this paper the relations between built form and everyday practices of home-living. These we see as co-constituting a combined domestic carbon space in which sociomaterial interdependencies are constantly at work. Carbon emissions are necessarily caught up in these interdependencies and not separable from them. We use the case of the mainstreaming of zero carbon (zero-C) housing in the UK to explore whether conceiving of domestic carbon in properly sociomaterial terms reveals possibilities for, or resistances to, carbon governance objectives. We find strong resistances to the notion that zero-C might mean simultaneously creating 'new normals' of built form and ways of living, with market values and governance delineations resisting any sharing of responsibility for achieving zero-C between those building and those living in future homes. The slippery, contested and diminished calculation of zero-C has also been closely coupled to these ends. This case shows that resistances to carbon control can emerge in interdependent sociomaterial forms and are strengthened through that interdependency, such that carbon lock-in works through entwined forms of inertia. However, we argue that in other instances and spaces of carbon governance we might find alternative sociomaterial articulations that serve to configure the politics of change in more positive ways.

  • 49. Watson, Kelly
    et al.
    Evans, James
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Whitley, Tim
    Capturing the social value of buildings: the promise of Social Return on Investment (SROI)2016In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 103, 289-301 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing post-occupancy research rarely considers the importance of the sociality of the building user community and its building user group dynamics. A social value agenda is proposed to promote user-centred design within the built environment, by looking beyond physical design to consider the dynamic interactions that exist between people and their built environment within the social context that mediates them. A social impact valuation methodology, Social Return on Investment (SROI), is trialled in three nonclinical case buildings of varying levels of user-centred design and different build types, representing applied social value research. A qualitative comparison of the "social value" of the case buildings considers the physical design, as well as their varying briefing and design processes, organisational set-ups and building management, and the experiences of the building users. However, the financial SROI data is inconsistent with the qualitative narratives, leading to concern over the effectiveness of SROI at capturing the implications of the sociality of the building user community.

  • 50. Watson, Kelly J.
    et al.
    Evans, James
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Whitley, Tim
    Re-conceiving building design quality: A review of building users in their social context2016In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 25, no 3, 509-523 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable overlap exists between post-occupancy research evaluating building design quality and the concept of 'social value', popularised by its recent application to issues of the public realm. To outline this potential research agenda, the paper reviews design quality research on buildings in relation to users and their social context where the term 'social context' refers to building user group dynamics, a combination of organisational cultures, management strategies, and social norms and practices. The review is conducted across five key building types, namely housing, workplaces, healthcare, education, and the retail/service sector. Research commonalities and gaps are identified in order to build a more comprehensive picture of the design quality literature and its handling of users in their social context. The key findings concerning each building type are presented visually. It is concluded that the design quality field comprises a patchwork of relatively isolated studies of various building types, with significant potential for theoretical and empirical development through interdisciplinary collaboration. Users tend to be conceived as anonymous and autonomous individuals with little analysis of user identity or interaction. Further, the contextual impact of user group dynamics on the relationship between building design and building user is rarely addressed in the literature. Producing a more nuanced understanding of users in situ is proposed as an important area for future design quality research.

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