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  • 1. Ahtiainen, Heini
    et al.
    Artell, Janne
    Czajkowski, Mikolaj
    Hasler, Berit
    Hasselström, Linus
    Enveco Environmental Economics Consultancy, Sweden.
    Huhtala, Anni
    Meyerhoff, Jürgen
    Smart, James C.R.
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Alemu, Muhammed H.
    Angeli, Daija
    Dahlbo, Kim
    Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi
    Hyytiäinen, Kari
    Karloseva, Aljona
    Khaleeva, Julia
    Maar, Marie
    Martinsen, Louise
    Nommann, Tea
    Pakalniete, Kristine
    Oskolokaite, Ieva
    Semeniene, Daiva
    Benefits of meeting nutrient reduction targets for the Baltic Sea: a contingent valuation study in the nine coastal states2014In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2160-6552, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 278-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Ahtiainen, Heini
    et al.
    Artell, Janne
    Czajkowski, Mikolaj
    Hasler, Berit
    Hasselström, Linus
    Enveco Environmental Economics Consultancy, Ltd., Sweden.
    Hyytiäinen, Kari
    Meyerhoff, Jürgen
    Smart, James C.R.
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Zimmer, Katrin
    Khaleeva, Julia
    Rastrigina, Olga
    Tuhkanen, Heidi
    Public preferences regarding use and condition of the Baltic Sea: An international comparison informing marine policy2013In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, no 42, p. 20-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Ahtiainen, Heini
    et al.
    Artell, Janne
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Hasselström, Linus
    Enveco.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Baltic Sea nutrient reductions: What should we aim for?2014In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 145, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient load reductions are needed to improve the state of the Baltic Sea, but it is still under debate how they should be implemented. In this paper, we use data from an environmental valuation study conducted in all nine Baltic Sea states to investigate public preferences of relevance to three of the involved decision-dimensions: First, the roles of nitrogen versus phosphorus reductions causing different eutrophication effects; second, the role of time – the lag between actions to reduce nutrient loads and perceived improvements; and third; the spatial dimension and the roles of actions targeting the coastal and open sea environment and different sub-basins. Our findings indicate that respondents view and value the Baltic Sea environment as a whole, and are not focussed only on their local sea area, or a particular aspect of water quality. We argue that public preferences concerning these three perspectives should be one of the factors guiding marine policy. This requires considering the entire range of eutrophication effects, in coastal and open sea areas, and including long-term and short-term measures.

  • 4.
    Hansen, Karin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Environm Protect Agcy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Anthesis Enveco, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Erik
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Noren, Katja
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Lysekil, Sweden..
    Olshammar, Mikael
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Anthesis Enveco, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Soutukorva, Asa
    Anthesis Enveco, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Integrating ecosystem services in Swedish environmental assessments: an empirical analysis2018In: Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal, ISSN 1461-5517, E-ISSN 1471-5465, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 253-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the growing number of policies and laws that encourage inclusion of ecosystem services (ES) in processes, we have investigated environmental impact assessments (EIA) and strategic environmental assessments (SEA) conducted in Sweden in order to analyse whether ES maybe integrated to enhance and improve environmental assessment of today. Representative Swedish environmental projects were reviewed. Three cases with different geographic and environmental settings were selected to allow us to study consideration of a wide range of different ES. We investigated the processes and discussions taking place using documentation from the cases. We formalized and labelled the expected impacts into an ES framework. Summarizing each case, we described conformities and divergences in explicit and implicit prioritizations between the actors. We discussed the benefits of integrating ES into current practices and possible improvements in the processes and methodologies. When ES could be integrated into EIAs and SEAs more aspects would be visualized and a larger stakeholder engagement stimulated leading to improved support for decision-making.

  • 5.
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    The monetary value of marine environmental change2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine ecosystems are fundamental for human welfare. A number of current environmental pressures need attention, and the formulation of management strategies requires information from a variety of analytical dimensions. The linkage between environmental change and resulting implications for human welfare is one such dimension.

    This thesis presents studies on welfare implications from hypothetical future policies which improve the state of the marine environment. The method for these studies is economic valuation. The studied scenarios concern eutrophication in the Baltic Sea (including the Kattegat) and oil spill risk from shipping in the Lofoten-Vesterålen area in the Arctic Barents Sea. The thesis shows that the economic benefits from undertaking policies to improve or protect the marine environment in these cases are substantial and exceed the costs of taking measures.

    In addition to providing new monetary estimates, the thesis also provides new insights concerning 1) what type of scenario to use when valuing an environmental improvement and 2) whether there may exist trade-offs between precision in estimates and the level of ambition with respect to survey instrument complexity and econometric models when conducting valuation studies. The findings suggest an end of an era for studies in which the environmental change is unspecified or based on a single environmental indicator while the actual consequences of the suggested measures are more multifaceted. In contrast, relevant scenarios to study are well-specified and holistic. The thesis further reveals that it might not always be worth the effort to go for the most advanced scenario presentation or statistically best-fitting model specifications. This is something that needs to be further discussed among practitioners in order to allocate valuation resources wisely and not waste resources on unnecessarily elegant valuation studies.

  • 6.
    Hasselström, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. Anthesis Enveco AB, Sverige.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Noring, Maria
    Kemikalieinspektionen.
    Soutukorva, Åsa
    Enveco.
    Khaleevac, Julia
    Costs and benefits associated with marine oil spill prevention in northern Norway2017In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to analyse conflicts regarding natural resources and ecosystem services involving different stakeholder groups using cost–benefit analysis (CBA). The paper is formed around a specific case study in Lofoten–Vesterålen in northern Norway, investigating costs and benefits of decreasing the probability of a major oil spill from shipping in the area. Benefits of decreasing the probability of a spill are far greater than costs, which means that measures to improve maritime safety would be economically profitable for society. Figures showing the effects of the impacts on fisheries and tourism sectors indicate that, compared to the total value for society, the market values of decreasing the probability of a spill are very small. On the other hand, non-market values associated with the protection of ecosystem services are of a much greater magnitude. These results suggest that the neglecting of non-market ecosystem service values in economic assessments for the Arctic may cause a biased picture of costs and benefits associated with measures to prevent environmental degradation. When feeding into decisions, such assessments may lead to too little preventive action from an economic perspective.

  • 7.
    Hasselström, Linus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Anthesis Enveco AB, Barnhusgatan 4, bv, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Visch, W.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nylund, G. M.
    Pavia, H.
    The impact of seaweed cultivation on ecosystem services - a case study from the west coast of Sweden2018In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 133, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seaweed cultivation attracts growing interest and sustainability assessments from various perspectives are needed. The paper presents a holistic qualitative assessment of ecosystem services affected by seaweed cultivation on the Swedish west coast. Results suggest that supporting, regulating and provisioning services are mainly positively or non-affected while some of the cultural services are likely negatively affected. The analysis opens for a discussion on the framing of seaweed cultivation – is it a way of supplying ecosystem services and/or a way of generating valuable biomass? Exploring these framings further in local contexts may be valuable for identifying trade-offs and designing appropriate policies and development strategies. Many of the found impacts are likely generalizable in their character across sites and scales of cultivation, but for some services, including most of the supporting services, the character of impacts is likely to be site-specific and not generalizable.

  • 8.
    Noring, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Soutokorva, Å.
    Kahleeva, Y.
    Costs and benefits associated with Arctic marine oil spill preventionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Noring, Maria
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hasselström, Linus
    Enveco Environmental Economics Consultancy, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Soutukorva, Åsa
    Gren, Åsa
    Valuation of oil spill risk reductions in the Arctic: 2016In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2160-6552, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 298-317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Scharin, Henrik
    et al.
    Ericsdotter, Siv
    Elliott, Michael
    Turner, R. Kerry
    Niiranen, Susa
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Hyytiainen, Kari
    Ahlvik, Lassi
    Ahtiainen, Heini
    Artell, Janne
    Hasselstrom, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Soderqvist, Tore
    Rockstrom, Johan
    Processes for the sustainable stewardship of marine environments2016In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 128, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable stewardship of the marine environment necessitates a holistic approach encompassing all the relevant drivers, activities and pressures causing problems for the natural state of the system and their impact on human societies today and in the future. This article provides a framework as well as a decision support process and tool that could guide such an approach. In this process, identifying costs and benefits of mitigation is a first step in deciding on measures and enabling instruments, which has to be accompanied by analyses regarding distributional effects (i.e. who gains or loses) related to different targets and policy instruments. As there are risks of future irreversible regime shifts and even system collapses, the assessments have to be broadened to include scenarios on possible future developments as well as ethical considerations. In particular, a deeper sustainable management strategy may be needed to respond to possible future increases in the rate of environmental change, amongst growing evidence of external pressures, interactions and non-linear dynamics. This adaptive management strategy should focus on building the resilience required to cope with and adapt to change.

1 - 10 of 10
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