Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Caluwaerts, P.
    et al.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH.
    Haagenrud, S. E.
    Service life standards: Background and relation to the european construction products directive2014In: Durability of Building Materials and Components 7, Taylor & Francis, 2014, p. 1353-1363Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The methodologies for service life prediction of building products have for many years been a focus area for research collaboration within the two organisations CIB and RILEM. Partly based on that work international standards addressing the design life of buildings are currently being elaborated by ISO. The working group ISO TC59/SC3/WG9 was set up on the request of among others CEN/BTS-1, and the work to be done has great relevance to the needs in Europe for standards addressing the issue of working life of buildings and building products. The paper presents the background to and the relevance of the standardisation work under way with a focus on the European dimension and relevance. There is an urgent need for standards, codes of practice or guides describing how to rationally design buildings from a service life point of view. In some countries, to meet this need, National Standards have been established. The European Construction Products Directive in force in the EU and most EFTA states sets out six essential requirements for works which must be satisfied during an economically reasonable working life. It has created a regulatory framework in which working life and durability aspects of products find an important place. Technical specifications for building products prepared by CEN and EOTA must contain provisions for assessing the products durability.

  • 2. Chevalier, Jean-Luc
    et al.
    Davies, Hywel
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Virk, Gurvinder Singh
    Smart-ECO - Developing a Construction Sector Vision and Related Requirements for Sustainable Eco-buildings2008In: Durability of Building Materials & Components 11: Globality and Locality in Durability (vol. 4), 2008, p. 1671-1677Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gudmundsson, Kjartan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Norberg, Peter
    Wolfram, Trinius
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Twumasi, Ebenezer
    Durable and robust vacuum insulation technology for buildings2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Haagenrud, Svein
    et al.
    Cole, Ivan
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Esposito, M. A.
    Geographical Information Systems for Sustainable Management of Built Environment2004In: Proc. of CIB World Building Congress 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the building and construction sector all features are location based. The world of geographic information and application orientation is moving extremely fast, and there is a real danger that the slow uptake of new technology and applications in the building sector will again leave the sector trailing behind, also implying a loss in sustainable development and competitive edge. In order to deal with this issue CIB in 1996 established the task group CIB/TG20-GIS. Based on the report CIB 256 from this group and its recommendations, CIB in 2000 established the working commission CIB W106 "Geographical Information Systems", with the overall objectives to provide an international platform for R and D of GIS in the building sector. The W106 has members from 14 countries/organisations and will present its progress report at this Congress, while its final report with conclusions and recommendations is due for the 10DBMC conference in 2005. The work is divided into the following four Tasks: TG1 - GIS-requirements and availability of geographic standards-, data and infra-structures, TG2 - GIS-based analysis and modelling of flow and distribution of materials in the built environment, TG3 - Spatial dynamic modelling for simulation of the interaction between the natural and the built environment, TG4 - GIS in Education and Info sources. Objectives and work programme for each of these tasks are given and illustrated with examples, taken from state-of-the-art reports on the use of GIS elaborated by the participating countries/organisations.

  • 5. Haagenrud, Svein
    et al.
    Cole, Ivan
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Esposito, M. A.
    Vanier, D. J.
    CIB W106 Geographical Information Systems: Work Period Report2005In: 10th International conference on durability of building materials and components: Lyon, France, 17-20 April 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the building and construction sector all features are location based. The world of geographic information and application orientation is moving extremely fast, thus challenging the building sector to facilitate and implement this new technology and applications. In order to deal with these issues CIB in 1996 established the task group CIB/TG20-GIS. Based on the report CIB 256 from this group and its recommendations, CIB in 2000 established the working commission CIB W106 - Geographical Information Systems., with the overall objectives to provide an international platform for R&D of GIS applications for the built environment, and to promote and encourage the use of GIS in the building sector. The W106 has members from 14 countries/organisations and will present its final report for work period 2001-04 due for the 10DBMC conference in 2005. The work is divided into the following four Tasks: TG1- GIS-requirements and availability of geographic standards-, -data and infra -structures, TG2- GIS-based analysis and modelling of flow and distribution of materials in the built environment, TG3- Spatial dynamic modelling for Simulation of the interaction between the natural and the built environment, TG4- GIS in Education and Info sources. Objectives and work programme for each of these tasks are given and illustrated with examples, taken from state .of-the-art reports on the use of GIS elaborated by the participating countries/organisations. With the rapid development of IFC based standards for digital object oriented models of building products there is a huge need for property sets, such as environmental exposure data, reference service life, service life models, factor distributions, LCA and LCC data, which can be linked directly to the building elements. The significant drive within the AEC/IFC to provide for relevant location based data (GIS) via IFC format will be a major facilitator for access to relevant durability data on the specific building site. It is concluded that time is ripe for a broad implementation of GIS based applications in the building sector. Hence, it is recommended that the work programme of W106 for the coming working period includes a focus on support for an IFC based fully integrated design and planning process for the built environment, as well as a close link to the European based R&D frameworks for integrated life cycle management of the built environment.

  • 6. Haagenrud, Svein
    et al.
    Krigsvoll, Guri
    Gussiås, Arne
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Hallberg, Daniel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Life cycle management of built environment: an ICT based concept and some cases2004In: Proceedings from the CIB World Building CongressArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Haagenrud, Svein
    et al.
    Krigsvoll, Guri
    Lisö, K. R.
    Thiis, T.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Environmental Characterisation and Mapping with respect to Durability: LYON [France] 17-20 April 20052005In: 10th International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service life planning calls for characterisation and classification of the exposure environment for theconstructed asset(s) in question. Lack of knowledge of environmental exposure data and modelsamong the building sector players is an important barrier for further progress towards service lifeprediction. The ever more evident climate change highlights even more the need for data and modelson the exposure, when it comes to address its impact on the built environment.In general, requirements for establishing and implementing systems for quantitative characterisationand classification of durability of materials and components are: 1) well defined, and relatively simpledamage functions for the materials in question, 2) availability of environmental exposure data/loads,including methods and models for assessing their geographical distribution, and 3) user friendly ITsystems for storage, processing and modelling the environmental loads onto structures.Service life functions related to environmental degradation are today available for a range of buildingmaterials and components. As for availability of environmental data and models, as well as proper ITsystems, it is shown that for most European countries, such data and models are available frommeteorological offices and the environmental research area, and that these data and the workperformed are directly applicable for service life planning and life cycle management of constructedassets. A short review of some of the most applicable models for environmental exposure and fordegradation and damage of building materials and structures is included.

    The global climate system is likely to undergo changes, regardless of the implementation of abatementpolicies under the Kyoto Protocol or other regimes. Both the functionality of the existing builtenvironment and the design of future buildings are likely to be altered by climate change impacts, andthe expected implications of these new conditions are now investigated.

    The data and models are often directly exhibited in computer-based systems, often on GIS basedplatforms. With the rapid development of IFC based standards for digital object oriented models ofbuilding products there is a huge need for property sets, such as durability and service life data, linkeddirectly to the building elements. The significant drive within the AEC/IFC community to provide forrelevant location based data (GIS) via IFC format will be a major facilitator for access to site specificdurability data, described by degradation models containing environmental (and other) degradationfactors.

  • 8.
    Hallberg, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Prediktivt underhåll av fasader2007In: Bygg & Teknik, ISSN 0281-658X, no 8, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Jernberg, Per
    et al.
    Lacasse, Michael
    Haagenrud, Svein
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Guide and Bibliography to Service Life and Durability Research for Buildings and Components2004Book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Karami, Peyman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Norberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Evaluation of the thermal conductivity of a new nanoporous silica material for VIPs: trends of thermal conductivity versus densityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11. Kus, Hulya
    et al.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Långtidsegenskaper hos putsade ytterväggar av lättbetong2003In: Bygg & Teknik, ISSN 0281-658X, no 8, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Lacasse, Michael
    et al.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Department of Building Materials Technology, KTH Research School, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Advances in Methods for Service Life Prediction of Building Materials and Components: Final report. Activities of the CIB W802005In: 10th DBMC International Conference on durability of building materials and components, 2005, p. 948-955Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of service life product standards and standardization of service life design and planning of buildings and constructed facilities are key elements for achieving .Sustainable Construction.. The technical committee CIB W80 has focused over the past decade, on the development of knowledge in support of such standards and design methods and it has been the prime purveyor of fundamental information on the service life prediction of building materials and components. A final report is provided of work completed in the most recent work programme covering the period between 2002-2005. Advances in three areas of estimating the service life of building products components or systems are outlined. These include the factorial method, an engineering design approach and reliability-based methods. As well, a summary is given of work carried out in related areas, including environmental factors. Additional information is provided on failure mode effects analysis and its use in the building industry. Insights are provided into the collaborative efforts and related activities within ISO TC 59 SC14 - "Design life" and the Performance based building (PeBBu) thematic network initiative focused on "Construction materials" of the fifth EC framework on Competitive and Sustainable Growth.

  • 13. Lacsse, Michael
    et al.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Recent advances of methods for prediction of service life of building materials and components: An overview2004In: Proceedings of the CIB World Building Congress, Toronto, Ontario, May 2, 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for "Sustainable Construction" necessarily imposes inherent requirements for specified levels of durability of building materials and components and it is understood that these can only be entrenched within the construction sector through standardization. however, a systematic and scientific approach to the development of these standards is fundamentally required. Hence, development work on methods for service life prediction is vital to achieving the necessary basis for the advancement of useful standards. Given the level of interest both nationally and internationally regarding achieving durability in products, standardization activities related to "service life and durability" are thus an on-going concern. Work generated within the CIB W80 / RILEM 175-SLM technical committee "Service life methodologies" provides a basis for developing the necessary information from which standards can thereafter be drafted. This brief report provides an overview of recent activities of the CIB W80 / RILEM 175-SLM TC, its on-going work program and proposed programs of activities for 2003-2005. As well, insights are provided into the collaborative efforts and related activities within ISO TC 59 SC14 - "Design life" and the Performance based building (PeBBu) thematic network initiative focused on "Construction materials" of the fifth EU framework on Competitive and Sustainable Growth.

  • 14.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Agenda 21 for Sustainable Construction: Global Strategy for Development towards Sustainability in the Built Environment2000In: Finnish Civil Engineering, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 6-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Materials Technology, Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle Sweden.
    Approaches to sustainability in building construction2001In: Structural Concrete, ISSN 1464-4177, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Approaches to sustainability in building construction2001In: Structural Concrete, ISSN 1464-4177, E-ISSN 1751-7648, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the various activities starting in the mid 1990s, which led to an internationally agreed Agenda 21 on Sustainable Construction, published by CIB in 1999. Further work, nationally, regionally and internationally to implement the Agenda is described. Sustainable construction is a way for the building and construction industry to respond towards achieving Sustainable development from the various environmental, socio-economic and cultural aspects. Trends and approaches in building to meet Sustainable development requirements are commented on, as well as the ongoing standardisation on the design life of constructed works.

  • 17.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Built to last a lifetime2008In: ISO Focus, ISSN 0303-805X, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 16-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Byggnadskvalitet, Materialteknik.
    EU-nätverk för funktionsanpassad byggprocess2002In: Miljöforskning, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Forskarutbildning på Högskolan2005Other (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sjöström, Christer
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Built Environment.
    Materials and Technologies for Sustainable Construction1999In: Materials and Structures, ISSN 1359-5997, E-ISSN 1871-6873, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 158-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main themes on which the symposium focused helped address some of the issues related to achieving sustainable construction. Evidently the collectively of the work suggests that this area is in the incipient stages and minor but nonetheless significant contributions have been made towards resolving these complex problems. Maintaining and sustaining the built environment through information integration, assessment and analysis techniques and the use of specifications as well as service life models for building materials, components and assemblies is likely to be an involved yet compelling challenge in the decades to come. Editorial Note This joint CIB/RILEM Symposium was one of the events organised during the CIB World Building Congress 1998 in Gävle, Sweden 7–12 June. As the President of CIB, Prof. C. Sjöström was in charge of the organisation of this congress. The Executive Secretariat of CIB 1998 was the Division of Materials Technology, Centre of Built Environment, Royal Institute of Technology, which is also a RILEM Titular Member.

  • 21.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Built Environment.
    Bakens, Wim
    CIB Agenda 21 for Sustainable Construction: why, how and what1999In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 348-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CIB's efforts to create an Agenda 21 for the construction sector are introduced here. CIB's unique position within the international construction community allowed it to initiate a specific sectorial response to the international agendas raised by Brundtland, Habitat II, Rio and Kyoto. CIB's recognition of the problems in establishing both a framework for sustainable development; how change within industry occurs, along with CIB's past, current and proposed activities meant that CIB was perfectly suited to respond to sustainable development. This CIB-led project resulted in global collaboration and co-ordination to specifically address sustainable development for the construction community. Situated between the broad international agendas and more local and subsectorial agendas, CIB's Agenda 21 is a conceptual framework that serves as an intermediary and provides for comparison and co-ordination. The three principal objectives are: to create a global framework and terminology that will add value to national, regional and sub-sectorial agendas; to create an agenda for CIB activities and for co-ordinating CIB with specialist partner organizations, and to provide a source document for definition of R&D activities.

  • 22.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle.
    Caluwaerts, Paul
    Jernberg, Per
    Haagenrud, Svein
    Ilomäki, Ari
    Davies, Hywel
    Product declarations with respect to durability: A progress report2005In: 10th DBMC International Conference on durability of building materials and components, 2005, p. 741-748Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of ISO/TC59/SC14 ”Design Life of Buildings” is to produce standards on the steps to be taken at various stages of the building cycle to ensure that the resulting constructed facility, will last for its intended life without incurring large unexpected expenditures of money or resources. The standards for design life of buildings also identify a guiding concept on durability of building products of help in implementing the European Construction Products Directive, CPD. Four parts of the standard series, ISO 15686 Buildings and Constructed Assets – Service Life Planning, have been published. Another 4 parts of the 15686 series are on the way to be approved, one being the Part 8 “Reference service life and service life estimation”. Of particular importance is the concept of Reference Service Life (RSL; the expected service life in a well-defined set of in-use conditions), the procedures for service life prediction (Part 2) and the Factor Method (FM) for estimation of service life in specific projects (Part 1 and 8). The FM is used to modify an RSL to obtain an estimated service life (ESL) of the components of a design object, while considering the difference between the projectspecific and the reference in-use conditions. This methodology receives much interest from the international R&D community. A challenge is to establish databases on RSL and factor distributions. This presupposes the involvement of the industry and other stakeholders in the work. RSL is also essential in providing environmental information on whole life cycle of building products. According to ISO/DIS 21930 Buildings and Constructed Assets – Sustainability in Building Construction – Environmental Declarations of Building Products, it is necessary to have RSL data of the product to provide scenarios for environmental impacts of the use stage of the product. The Part 9 “Service life declaration in Product standards” is developed in parallel with work in CEN to establish guidance documents for inclusion of durability declarations in product standards. For innovative products EOTA (European Organisation for Technical Approvals) are issuing European Technical Approvals, where the durability evaluation is performed according to EOTA guidance developed on the basis of the service life prediction concepts as expressed in ISO 15686-2. With the rapid development of IFC based standards for digital object oriented models of building products there is a huge need for property sets, such as durability and service life data, which can be linked directly to the building elements.

  • 23.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Davies, Hywel
    Built to last: Service life planning2005In: ISO Focus, ISSN 0303-805X, Vol. December, p. 13-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    LMS, Life Management System: Ett IT/GIS-baserat system för prediktivt och optimerat underhåll av byggnader och infrastrukturer2006In: Teknik och Vetenskap, ISSN 1402-5701, no 3, p. 50-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Hallberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Service Life Tools and Methodologies; Standards and aLife Cycle Management System2007In: Third International Conference onMaintenance and Facility Management, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Hameury, Stephane
    Möjligheter och utmaningar för träbyggande2006In: Bygg & Teknik, ISSN 0281-658X, no 1, p. 52-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Träbyggandet upplever faktiskt en renässans eftersom det blivit tillåtet att bygga trähus i flera våningar (över två våningar) efter förändringar av brandföreskrifterna i Sverige år 1994. Till exempel tillåter installation av boendesprinkler idag synliga träytor inomhus. Detta är en direkt konsekvens av EU:s byggproduktdirektiv, CPD, ett funktionsbaserat direktiv för byggmarknaden. Näringsdepartementet publicerade 2004 ett underlag till en nationell strategi för att öka användningen av trä i byggandet.

  • 27.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Department of Building Materials Technology, KTH Research School, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    From Sustainable Construction Requirements to Codes and Standards2005In: 2005 International Congress - Global Construction: Ultimate Concrete Opportunities / [ed] Dhir R.K., Newlands M.D., Whyte A., 2005, p. 455-464Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development requirements in society are presenting specifically expressed challenges to building and construction. These challenges are recognised and met by the building and construction sector on an overall level, but only slowly penetrate into the discussions and operation of daily construction work. An international trend towards increased demands on service life planning, in Europe e.g. expressed by the Construction Products Directive, resulting in an adaptation of standards and codes might promote a change in the construction industry. The article presents the history and background of sustainable construction, pictures the development and state of relevant directives and standards, and couples sustainable construction to the trend towards performance based thinking in construction. The rapid development of IT-based life cycle design and management tools is briefly commented. Is the building and construction sector mature enough to meet the challenges and to take this road to the future? There are market arguments and business possibilities, but also a daily practice providing examples of counteraction

  • 28.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Per
    Framtidens byggnad planerad för livslängd2004In: Bygg Info PM, ISSN 0348-1468, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Lair, Jerome
    Performance Based Building: Some implications on Construction Materials and Components2003In: 2nd International Symposium: Integrated Lifetime Engineering of Buildingsand Civil Infrastructures, 2003, p. 13-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most countries the structural codes has since long moved from simple deemed-to-satisfy approaches to a performance thinking. As regards the properties of non-load bearing parts of buildings and hence building products the state-of-the-art is still more complex, but the performance road is evident. The European Construction Products Directive, CPD (Council directive 89/106/EEC), which states that the Essential Requirements on constructed works should be met during the intended working life of the building results in essence in a performance requirement on all building products. The life performance of the materials and products has to be assessed and declared. The article accounts for the ongoing work within the EU FP5 Thematic Network PeBBu (Performance Based Building) and how this in the area of building products is connected to the standardisation operated by ISO TC59/SC 14 Design Life. The standardisation within ISO has both historic and novel connections to CEN and to the CPD.

  • 30.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    North European Regional Platform: PeBBu Regional Platform 12005Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    Chevalier, Jean-Luc
    Life Performance of Construction Materials and Components2005Book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Chevalier, Jean-Luc
    Life Performance of Construction Materials and Components: PeBBu Domain 1 Final Report2005Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    Centre for Built Environment, Building Materials Technology, of the University of Gävle in Sweden.
    Davies, Hywel
    Lifetime performance of buildings2006In: ISO Focus, ISSN 1729-8709, Vol. 4, no December 06/January 07, p. 29-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    Davies, Hywel
    Lair, Jaques
    International Standards on Durability and Sustainability of Construction works2008In: 11DBMC International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components, 2008, p. 1585-1592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Directive on Construction Products (CPD) establishes a set of essential requirements on construction products to be fulfilled throughout the "working life" of the construction works. The demands expressed in the directive is one significant driver, international attention another. Both CEN through a "task force on durability" and ISO through TC59/SC14 "Design Life" are addressing the subject. The work of ISO has led to the establishment of a suite of procedural standards on service life planning, including service life declaration and service life assessment methodologies, useful to be applied in the declaration and the application of service life information. The political agendas related to sustainable development and the understanding that building and construction is a key industrial sector to implement sustainability principles have led to the establishment of ISO TC59/SC17 "Sustainability in building construction". Being the first ISO subcommittee expressly dealing with sustainability in relation to an industrial sector, the work focuses on economic, environmental and social aspects of sustainability relative to buildings and construction works. Together with the established standards on service life and the concept of performance-based building, all the three provide a procedural reference point for the consideration of sustainability aspects. They all benefit when applied in common context, and can provide each other with necessary information. On a European scale this common context is elaborated with the work of CEN TC350. The status of development, key drivers and key success factors are elaborated in this paper.

  • 35.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Center for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Wolfram, Trinius
    Center for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Service life planning and performance requirements2005In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service life planning comprises a model for the determination of a reasonable expected service life for buildings and components, and it establishes a routine for the assessment of design alternatives. A design option is considered reasonable when it meets or exceeds performance requirements over time that have been drawn up specifically for the specific project. Due to this assessment reference, there is a very evident link to the concept of performance-based building. Any stakeholder involved in the value chain or in the design process of the building, as well as regulators and building users, can express performance requirements. Identified requirements, both in relevance and in quality, will vary with the stakeholder and his/her perspective of interest. As building sector manufacturers develop most products with reference to standards rather than with reference to specific requirements, there is no direct link from user requirements to the product design. Instead, the building designer has the responsibility to ensure performance requirements are met by the performance of products integrated into the design. As these design decisions also have to be made at the material and component level, a performance-based building would benefit from an established rationale that enables the communication of performance requirements across the relevant system levels in the relevant design processes. A path for the connection of the established concepts of service life planning and performance-based building is presented. The aim is to identify key elements that need to be developed for the successful linkage of performance-based building with service life planning.

  • 36.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Smart-ECO; Sustainable Smart ECO-Buildings in the EU: First Project Report2008In: CIB Newsletter, no MarchArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    et al.
    Ingenieurbüro Trinius, Hamburg.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Ingenieurbüro Trinius, Hamburg.
    Sustainability in building construction: international standards in progress2007In: Journal of ASTM International, ISSN 1546-962X, E-ISSN 1546-962X, Vol. 4, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of ISO 15392 on general principles of sustainability in building construction took more time than expected. The most significant reason for this was the need to identify a common basis for the conceptual content of the document. With this basis now being identified, the work has taken up momentum and the general principles document presents principles to be considered when addressing the thematic field of sustainable development in relation to building and civil engineering. A key problem to be tackled in international standardization is finding the balance between the necessary level of detail to actually provide something to the user of the standard, and at the same time not to be too specific in order to allow different nations and their specific perspectives to still agree to the standard. While the challenge of sustainable development is global, the strategies for addressing sustainability in building construction are local and differ in context and content from region to region. Such strategies will reflect the context not only in the building environment, but also very much the social environment. This social environment includes cultural issues, legislation and regulation, as well as the needs and concerns of all the users and interested parties involved. Applying the concept of sustainability to specific buildings or other construction works includes a holistic approach, bringing together the global concerns and goals of sustainable development and the demands and requirements in terms of product functionality, efficiency, and economy. Different target audiences will have a different perspective on these challenges and the preferred solutions. The standards must hence put the topic onto a common playing field, still allowing different perspectives to be applied and priorities to be set, as well as recognizing that many aspects of sustainable development lie without the possible content of international technical standardization. ISO 15392 is related to and set into the context of other international standards and widely applied concepts, such as the performance-based building concept and the ISO 15686 series. This paper illustrates the set of related international standards and discusses the modular application. We want to discuss key factors needing consideration in order to bring the set of standards to successful application.

  • 38.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Chevalier, Jean-Luc
    Concluding Remarks & Outlook on Service Life Performance of Products & Systems2005In: PeBBU News LetterArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Trinius, Wolfram
    et al.
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Chevalier, Jean-Luc
    Hans, Julien
    Life performance and innovation on construction materials and components2005In: Performance Based Building / [ed] Huovila, Pekka, 2005, p. 14-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PeBBu domain 1 on life performance of construction materials and components is part of the EU financed thematic network on Performance based Building. Domain 1 addresses issues in a thematic field, where performance based building, service life, life performance and environmental declaration of products draw attention to each other. As can be seen in the recent development of international standards, service life and performance requirements gain a significant position as part of sustainability assertions of buildings and building products. Domain 1 aims to identify aspects of practical application of the ISO standards series 15686 on service life planning, as these standards provide the methodological basis to identify service life, and to provide the market with service life information. As service life per se relates to performance requirements and performance over time, and as sustainability in building construction related to fitness for purpose, performance based building fulfils a central hotspot of concern in relation to building sustainability. D1 addresses stakeholders' concerns when involving service life - both concerning the provision of information as the adaptation of information to a specific building design. Hence, concerns of manufacturers as well as designers and other relevant stakeholders are dealt with. Issues of concern for further R a. D as well as feedback and input to ongoing international standardisation, are identified by D1. With the direct link to the durability and service life research community and the involved standardisation bodies, the thematic network can play an important role in promoting performance based building.

  • 40.
    Twumasi, Ebenezer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Forslund, Mikael
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Norberg, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Textural and adsorption properties of a carbon-silica composite adsorbent for air filtration2010In: World journal of Engineering, ISSN 1708-5284, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 227-228Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41. Twumasi, Ebenezer
    et al.
    Norberg, PeterSjöström, ChristerCentre for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Tailored Precipitated Silica Adsorbents for the Built Environment2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper provides a review of the synthesis and adsorptive properties of a novel class of precipitated silica materials. To enhance or tailor the adsorption efficiency, various trapping chemicals (potassium hydroxide, potassium permanganate) or co-adsorbents (coconut activated carbon) are incorporated in the structure of the substrate material. Further, it discusses the applicability and performance over time of the material as adsorbents for removal of hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide and toluene contaminants which are potentially hazardous to sensitive equipment and more importantly, human health. Chemical substances in the air are an unavoidable by-product of most human endeavours within industry and transportation. The need for adsorbents to combat Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) follows from the continued intensification of the global environmental movement as well as the rapid industrialisation of developing countries. The removal performance of modified precipitated silica adsorbent shows that the new adsorbent can be tailored to remove low concentrations of sulphur dioxide, hydrogen sulphide and toluene contaminants at indoor environment conditions. The results further shows that the new precipitated silica adsorbent impregnated with 8 wt% KOH shows better performance than commercial alumina impregnated with 8 wt% KMnO4.The adsorbent material may find interesting and efficient uses as passive sinks for pollutants incorporated into more traditional building products such as acoustic baffles or as ingredients in various coatings. The filter material is environmentally friendly and consists of benign chemicals that are abundant worldwide. Performance over time aspects, re-use and recycling of exhausted filter materials are key issues addressed.

  • 42. Virk, Gurvinder
    et al.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Engström, Maria
    Trinius, Wolfram
    Standards and/or ethics for service robots?2006In: Ethics of Human Interaction with Robotic, Bionic, and AI Systems: concepts and policies, 2006, p. 69-75Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf