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  • 1.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Rossitto, Chiara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Jorge (Adler), Pedro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinson
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    On a Mission without a Home Base: Conceptualizing Nomadicity in Student Group Work2006In: COOPERATIVE SYSTEMS DESIGN: SEAMLESS INTEGRATION OF ARTIFACTS AND CONVERSATIONS - ENHANCED CONCEPTS OF INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMMUNICATION / [ed] Hassanaly P, Herrmann T, Kunau G, Zacklad M, 2006, Vol. 137, p. 23-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are observing that the current body of CSCW research is focusing either on stable workplaces with a single cooperative unit or on mobile work, with highly mobile professionals. We are attempting to fill the gap between workplace and mobile with a field study of student work, which we regard as exhibiting a high degree of nomadicity. After comparing student work with centres of coordination and mobility work, we unpack the notion of nomadicity as a work condition, constituted by a complex of discontinuities, leading to work partitioning and re-assembly. We draw design and methodological implications.

  • 2.
    Rositto, Chiara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Designing for "nomadic" student group work2007In: Proceedings of Working with Computing Systems, 2007, p. 110-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from two case studies aiming at understanding nomadic work in the context of students’ collaborative activities. By drawing on data collected by adopting ethnographic methods, we present and discuss a notion of nomadicity as characterized by discontinuities. Eventually, we explore some considerations for design that we address as relevant for the settings we have studied.

  • 3.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Managing Work at Several Places: Understanding Nomadic Practices in Student Groups2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within Swedish universities students are often required to work in groups to collaborate on projects or to write essays. A salient feature characterizing this type of work is the lack of a stable and fixed location wherein project- related activities can be carried out and accomplished. Thus, by regarding students as instances of nomadic workers, this thesis investigates the nomadic practices in the context of their group work, with particular attention to issues related to collaborative and coordinative aspects. Although the lack of a stable office has, somehow, always characterized students’ activities, the spread of mobile technologies raises relevant analytical issues concerning the relationships between individuals’ practices, the use of particular technologies and the physical environments in which interactions may occur. In this regard, this thesis provides an example of how a philosophical conceptualization of place as the product of human experience can assist in exploring: (a) the relationships between students’ activities, the locales they work at, and the situated use of specific technological artifacts; (b) how students occupy and experience places, by investing them with activities, meanings and values; (c) how different physical environments constrain and shape the way activities are performed. The data were collected by means of ethnographically-informed methods during two different field studies for which two design courses, held at a technical university, had been chosen as settings. Within both of them, the participants were to develop a prototype of novel IT technologies, and to account for the evolution of their projects by means of a report. The two studies aimed at understanding: (a) how students organize their activities at a number of locations, and how it reflects on the activities they engage with; (b) the strategies they adopt and the technologies they use to overcome problems deriving from the lack of a stable workplace, (c) the different ways a workplace is practically created, how it emerges from students’ interactions with the environment they inhabit, and how it is mediated by the technology they use (place-making). Observations, field-notes, video-recordings, semi-structured interviews were used during the phase of data collection. Some participants were also asked to fill in a diary and to take pictures of the different sites used for their project activities. In addition, a workshop, organized as a focus group, was arranged in order to unpack issues concerning students’ usage of various technologies, with respect to number of people involved, ongoing activities and the related chosen locations. The data analysis suggests that taking into account the way a place is disassembled and the way nomadic workers manage to move out of it is central to an understanding of their work practices. Moreover, it shows that the participants experienced planning the division of work as essential in order to manage coordination and collaboration within the groups, to organize collaborative and individual activities, and to allocate them to differing physical places. Furthermore, this thesis outlines in what way a focus on place may assist designers in reflecting on the design of educational environments, and of technological artifacts enabling students to share and integrate heterogeneous sources of information.

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  • 4.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Managing work at several places: a case of project work in a nomadic group of students2007In: Proceedings of ECCE 2007, the European Conference of Cognitive Ergonomics, 2007, p. 45-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation -- This paper explores the collaborative and spatial practices of university students engaged in project work. Regarding students as nomadic workers, we attempt to elucidate how their activities are shaped by the lack of a stable and fixed location where work can be carried out.

    Research approach -- The data presented in this paper were collected by means of ethnographically-informed methods.

    Findings/Design -- The results elucidate how students manage their collaborative activities at different locations and how they use artifacts and technology in order to do so.

    Research limitations/Implications -- Only Swedish students participated in the field study discussed in this paper. Cultural attributes, related to privacy for instance, might contribute to the distinction between private and public places.

    Originality/Value -- This work highlights the relationships between group activities and the places they are bound to, with a main focus on how these relationships are mediated by technological artifacts.

    Take away message -- The nomadic work described suggests that design efforts should be oriented towards an integration of different applications and/or technological devices.

  • 5.
    Smit, Rob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    A study of Digital Note sharing in Nomadic Groups2008In: Proceedings of COOP 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a study of an Anoto® digital pen and paper usage in three student project groups over three months. We have set up a system including a digital pen and paper, handwriting recognition software, and provided the conditions for wireless note sharing over Bluetooth, and thereafter we let the students use the technology as they went about their activities. Our goal was to evaluate the system's potential for student groups as usage naturally occurred and to assess how the participants integrated the technology in their work and whether it bridged the physical-digital gap. We found that even if the technology works well for individual use, collaborative use of digital pen and paper posed important issues, which we discuss in the light of our notion of nomadicity as a work condition, as well as in the light of the increasingly opportunistic nature of handwriting nowadays.

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