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  • 1.
    Romson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Methods for protein analysis by capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein analysis is important to understanding biological systems, but sample diversity necessitates a multitude of analysis techniques and methods. Challenges that are addressed include analysis of low abundance samples, fractionation to reduce sample complexity, and automation to reduce time and cost.

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an important technique for protein characterization. In Paper I, the sensitivity of MALDI-MS was enhanced through the fabrication of a hydrophobic coating for the MALDI target plate, yielding analyte concentration. The plate outperformed a commercial concentration plate.

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation offers low sample consumption and high efficiency, and in Paper II, offline CE-MALDI-MS fractionation was employed. A robot system for automation was constructed and used in analysis of spermatophore proteins from the butterfly Pieris napi. The robot was also used in automated on-target trypsin digestion under a lid of liquid fluorocarbons, a simpler and cheaper alternative to controlled humidity chambers. An indication of indigenous proteolysis of the sample was seen.

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the other technique for protein analysis in MS. In Paper III, the biomarker protein osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by ESI-MS in order to find suitable conditions for its detection. A preliminary optimization of solvents and ionization conditions was done, and tandem MS (MSn) performed to increase the reliability of identification.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-19 11:25
  • 2.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    ESI-MSn Analysis of Recombinant Human OsteopontinManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The low-abundance protein osteopontin is implicated in several serious diseases, where its concentration andglycosylation patterns might be analyzed for its use as a biomarker. The glycosylation has previously been studied andcharacterized mainly on digested protein. Allowing analysis of glycosylation using the intact protein would reduce theworkload and analysis time, as well as introducing less potential sources of error and bias. Here, the detection of intactosteopontin by ESI-MS is presented. By using a matrix with a high proportion of isopropanol, osteopontin could be detectedand fragmented in tandem MS at 10 µg/mL by direct infusion. A lower osteopontin mass was also present in the sample. Theresults open the possibilities of further analysis of osteopontin by tandem MS and suggests a reporter ion.

  • 3.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Jacksen, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Biotage Sweden AB, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    An automated system for CE-MALDI and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid applied on spermatophore proteins from Pieris napi2019In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 1104, p. 228-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for off-line CE-MALDI-TOF-MS and MS2, and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was developed and applied for the analysis of proteins in the spermatophore of the butterfly Pieris napi. Fractionation revealed many peptides otherwise not detected or resolved. Automated fractionation was performed with an in-lab developed robotic system, and automated on-target tryptic digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was demonstrated with the same system. Fractionation onto a pre-structured MALDI-concentration plate facilitated aligned deposition of trypsin and MALDI-matrix with the deposited sample, also under the fluorocarbon lid. Some indications of indigenous proteolysis of spermatophore proteins were seen, and searching MS2 spectra suggested three tentative sequence homologies to P. rapae. The study demonstrates the functionality of the lab-made robot. Detailed manufacturing instructions and code are provided. The feasibility of automated on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid, and the usefulness of a structured concentration plate in CE-MALDI fractionation was shown. Further, it constitutes a preliminary study of P. napi spermatophore proteins.

  • 4.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Jacksén, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    An automated system for CE-MALDI and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid applied on spermatophore proteins from Pieris napiIn: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for off-line CE‑MALDI‑TOF-MS and MS2, and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was developed and applied for the analysis of proteins in the spermatophore of the butterfly Pieris napi. Fractionation revealed many peptides otherwise not detected or resolved. Automated fractionation was performed with an in-lab developed robotic system, and automated on-target tryptic digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was demonstrated with the same system. Fractionation onto a pre-structured MALDI-concentration plate facilitated aligned deposition of trypsin and MALDI-matrix with the deposited sample, also under the fluorocarbon lid. Some indications of indigenous proteolysis of spermatophore proteins were seen, and searching MS2 spectra suggested three tentative sequence homologies to P. rapae. The study demonstrates the functionality of the lab-made robot. Detailed manufacturing instructions and code are provided. The feasibility of automated on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid, and the usefulness of a structured concentration plate in CE-MALDI fractionation was shown. Further, it constitutes a preliminary study of P. napi spermatophore proteins.

  • 5.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Jacksén, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Simple and environmentally friendly fabrication of superhydrophobic alkyl ketene dimer coated MALDI concentration plates2017In: Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 1044-0305, E-ISSN 1879-1123, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1733-1736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a method to manufacture peptide-concentrating MALDI-plates with alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) as a new superhydrophobic coating. The fabrication of the hydrophobic plates included application of AKD by airbrush, and negative contact printing to generate the concentration sites. Deposited sample droplets were contained within the prestructured sites, and self-adjusted onto the site if slightly misplaced. No AKD contamination was observed, and the plates could easily be cleaned and regenerated. The S/N values for four model peptides was about twice as high compared with a standard steel plate and a commercial concentration plate.

  • 6.
    Xie, Sheng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Manuguri, Sesha
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Proietti, Giampiero
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Romson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Fu, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Inge, A. K.
    Wu, B.
    Zhang, Yang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Häll, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of theranostic antibiotic nanodrugs that display enhanced antibacterial activity and luminescence2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 32, p. 8464-8469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the modular formulation of ciprofloxacin-based pure theranostic nanodrugs that display enhanced antibacterial activities, as well as aggregation-induced emission (AIE) enhancement that was successfully used to image bacteria. The drug derivatives, consisting of ciprofloxacin, a perfluoroaryl ring, and a phenyl ring linked by an amidine bond, were efficiently synthesized by a straightforward protocol from a perfluoroaryl azide, ciprofloxacin, and an aldehyde in acetone at room temperature. These compounds are propeller-shaped, and upon precipitation into water, readily assembled into stable nanoaggregates that transformed ciprofloxacin derivatives into AIE-active luminogens. The nanoaggregates displayed increased luminescence and were successfully used to image bacteria. In addition, these nanodrugs showed enhanced antibacterial activities, lowering the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by more than one order of magnitude against both sensitive and resistant Escherichia coli. The study represents a strategy in the design and development of pure theranostic nanodrugs for combating drug-resistant bacterial infections.

  • 7.
    Zhou, Yuye
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Romson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    An antibody-free sample pretreatment method for osteopontin combined with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e0213405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteopontin is an osteoblast-secreted protein with an aspartic acid-rich, highly phosphorylated, and glycosylated structure. Osteopontin can easily bind to integrins, tumor cells, extracellular matrix and calcium, and is related to bone diseases, various cancers, inflammation etc. Here, DEAE-Cibacron blue 3GA was used to extract recombinant osteopontin from human plasma, and to deplete abundant plasma proteins with an antibody-free method. Using selected buffer systems, osteopontin and human serum albumin could be bound to DEAE-Cibacron blue 3GA, while immunoglobulin G was excluded. The bound osteopontin could then be separated from albumin by using different sequential elution buffers. By this method, 1 μg/mL recombinant osteopontin could be separated from the major part of the most abundant proteins in human plasma. After trypsin digestion, the extracted osteopontin could be successfully detected and identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS using the m/z 1854.898 peptide and its fragments.

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