Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bachynskyi, M.
    et al.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Biomechanical Simulation in the Analysis of Aimed Movements2013In: Extended Abstracts (Works in Progress) CHI’13, ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For efficient design of gestural user interfaces both performance and fatigue characteristics of movements must be understood. We are developing a novel method that allows for biomechanical analysis in conjunction with performance analysis. We capture motion data using optical tracking from which we can compute performance measures such as speed and accuracy. The measured motion data also serves as input for a biomechanical simulation using inverse dynamics and static optimization on a full-body skeletal model. The simulation augments the data by biomechanical quantities from which we derive an index of fatigue. We are working on an interactive analysis tool that allows practitioners to identify and compare movements with desirable performance and fatigue properties. We show the applicability of our methodology using a case study of rapid aimed movements to targets covering the 3D movement space uniformly.

  • 2. Bachynskyi, M.
    et al.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Is Motion Capture-Based Biomechanical Simulation Valid for HCI Studies?: Study and Implications2014In: Proc. ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 3215-3224Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motion-capture-based biomechanical simulation is a non-invasive analysis method that yields a rich description of posture, joint, and muscle activity in human movement. The method is presently gaining ground in sports, medicine, and industrial ergonomics, but it also bears great potential for studies in HCI where the physical ergonomics of a design is important. To make the method more broadly accessible, we study its predictive validity for movements and users typical to studies in HCI. We discuss the sources of error in biomechanical simulation and present results from two validation studies conducted with a state-of-the-art system. Study I tested aimed movements ranging from multitouch gestures to dancing, finding out that the critical limiting factor is the size of movement. Study II compared muscle activation predictions to surface-EMG recordings in a 3D pointing task. The data shows medium-to-high validity that is, however, constrained by some characteristics of the movement and the user. We draw concrete recommendations to practitioners and discuss challenges to developing the method further.

  • 3. Bachynskyi, M.
    et al.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Steimle, J.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Performance and Ergonomics of Touch Surfaces: A Comparative Study Using Biomechanical Simulation2015In: CHI '15: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 1817-1826Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although different types of touch surfaces have gained extensive attention in HCI, this is the first work to directly compare them for two critical factors: performance and ergonomics. Our data come from a pointing task (N=40) carried out on five common touch surface types: public display (large, vertical, standing), tabletop (large, horizontal, seated), laptop (medium, adjustably tilted, seated), tablet (seated, in hand), and smartphone (single- and two-handed input). Ergonomics indices were calculated from biomechanical simulations of motion capture data combined with recordings of external forces. We provide an extensive dataset for researchers and report the first analyses of similarities and differences that are attributable to the different postures and movement ranges.

  • 4. Bachynskyi, M.
    et al.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Informing the Design of Novel Input Methods with Muscle Coactivation Clustering2015In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, Vol. 21, no 6, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel summarization of biomechanical and performance data for user interface designers. Previously, there was no simple way for designers to predict how the location, direction, velocity, precision, or amplitude of users’ movement affects performance and fatigue. We cluster muscle coactivation data from a 3D pointing task covering the whole reachable space of the arm. We identify eleven clusters of pointing movements with distinct muscular, spatio-temporal and performance properties. We discuss their use as heuristics when designing for 3D pointing.

  • 5. Micallef, Luana
    et al.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Oulasvirta, Antti
    Weinkauf, Tino
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Towards Perceptual Optimization of the Visual Design of Scatterplots2017In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1588-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing a good scatterplot can be difficult for non-experts in visualization, because they need to decide on many parameters, such as marker size and opacity, aspect ratio, color, and rendering order. This paper contributes to research exploring the use of perceptual models and quality metrics to set such parameters automatically for enhanced visual quality of a scatterplot. A key consideration in this paper is the construction of a cost function to capture several relevant aspects of the human visual system, examining a scatterplot design for some data analysis task. We show how the cost function can be used in an optimizer to search for the optimal visual design for a user's dataset and task objectives (e.g., "reliable linear correlation estimation is more important than class separation"). The approach is extensible to different analysis tasks. To test its performance in a realistic setting, we pre-calibrated it for correlation estimation, class separation, and outlier detection. The optimizer was able to produce designs that achieved a level of speed and success comparable to that of those using human-designed presets (e.g., in R or MATLAB). Case studies demonstrate that the approach can adapt a design to the data, to reveal patterns without user intervention.

  • 6. Oulasvirta, A.
    et al.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Bachynskyi, M.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Gestikulieren mit Stil2014In: Informatik-Spektrum, ISSN 0170-6012, E-ISSN 1432-122X, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 449-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Um Überanstrengungen und Ermüdungen vorzubeugen, müssen sich die Designer von neuen Nutzerschnittstellen auch über ergonomische Aspekte Gedanken machen. Hierzu kann eine Methode eingesetzt werden, bei der optisches Motion Capture und anschließende biomechanische Simulation verwendet werden. Wir erklären die Methode und beschreiben, wie wir sie im Bereich der Mensch-Computer-Interaktion einsetzen.

  • 7.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Visual Analysis of Multidimensional Data for Biomechanics and HCI2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidimensional analysis is performed in many scientific fields.Its main tasks involve the identification of correlations between data dimensions,the investigation of data clusters, and the identification of outliers. Visualization techniques often help in getting a better understanding. In this thesis, we present our work on improving visual multidimensional analysis by exploiting the semantics of the data and enhancing the perception of existing visualizations. Firstly, we exploit the semantics of the data by creating new visualizations which present visual encodings specifically tailoredto the analyzed dimensions. We consider the resulting visual analysis to be more intuitive for the user asit provides a more easily understandable idea of the data. In this thesis we concentrate on the visual analysis of multidimensional biomechanical data for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).To this end, we present new visualizations tackling the specific features of different aspectsof biomechanical data such as movement ergonomics, leading to a more intuitive analysis. Moreover, by integrating drawings or sketches of the physical setup of a case study as new visualizations, we allow for a fast and effective case-specific analysis. The creation of additional visualizations for communicating trends of clusters of movements enables a cluster-specific analysis which improves our understanding of postures and muscular co-activation.Moreover, we create a new visualization which addresses the specificity of the multidimensional data related to permutation-based optimization problems. Each permutation of a given set of n elements represents a point defined in an n-dimensional space. Our method approximates the topologyof the problem-related optimization landscape inferring the minima basins and their properties and visualizing them organized in a quasi-landscape. We show the variability of the solutions in a basin using heat maps generated from permutation matrices.Furthermore, we continue improving our visual multidimensional analysis by enhancing the perceptual encoding of existing well-known multidimensional visualizations. We focus on Parallel Coordinates Plots (PCP) and its derivative Continuous Parallel Coordinates (CPC). The main perceptual issues of PCP are visual clutter and overplotting which hamper the recognition of patterns in large data sets. In this thesis, we present an edge-bundling method for PCP which uses density-based clustering for each dimension. This reduces clutter and provides a faster overview of clusters and trends. Moreover, it allows for a fast rendering of the clustered lines using polygons. Furthermore, we present the first bundling approach for Continuous Parallel Coordinates where classic edge-bundling fails due to the absence of lines. Our method performs a deformation of the visualization space of CPC leading to similar results as those obtained through classic edge-bundling.Our work involved 10 HCI case studies and helped to establisha new research methodology in this field. This led to publications in internationally peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings.

  • 8.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics.
    Bachynskyi, M.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Seidel, H. -P
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics.
    An Edge-Bundling Layout for Interactive Parallel Coordinates2014In: Proc. IEEE PacificVis, IEEE , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parallel Coordinates is an often used visualization method for multidimensional data sets. Its main challenges for large data sets are visual clutter and overplotting which hamper the recognition of patterns in the data. We present an edge-bundling method using density-based clustering for each dimension. This reduces clutter and provides a faster overview of clusters and trends. Moreover, it allows rendering the clustered lines using polygons, decreasing rendering time remarkably. In addition, we design interactions to support multidimensional clustering with this method. A user study shows improvements over the classic parallel coordinates plot in two user tasks: correlation estimation and subset tracing.

  • 9.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    Bachynskyi, M.
    Oulasvirta, A.
    Seidel, H. -P
    Weinkauf, Tino
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Germany.
    MovExp: A Versatile Visualization Tool for Human-Computer Interaction Studies with 3D Performance and Biomechanical Data2014In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 2359-2368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), experts seek to evaluate and compare the performance and ergonomics of user interfaces. Recently, a novel cost-efficient method for estimating physical ergonomics and performance has been introduced to HCI. It is based on optical motion capture and biomechanical simulation. It provides a rich source for analyzing human movements summarized in a multidimensional data set. Existing visualization tools do not sufficiently support the HCI experts in analyzing this data. We identified two shortcomings. First, appropriate visual encodings are missing particularly for the biomechanical aspects of the data. Second, the physical setup of the user interface cannot be incorporated explicitly into existing tools. We present MovExp, a versatile visualization tool that supports the evaluation of user interfaces. In particular, it can be easily adapted by the HCI experts to include the physical setup that is being evaluated, and visualize the data on top of it. Furthermore, it provides a variety of visual encodings to communicate muscular loads, movement directions, and other specifics of HCI studies that employ motion capture and biomechanical simulation. In this design study, we follow a problem-driven research approach. Based on a formalization of the visualization needs and the data structure, we formulate technical requirements for the visualization tool and present novel solutions to the analysis needs of the HCI experts. We show the utility of our tool with four case studies from the daily work of our HCI experts.

  • 10.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Oulasvirta, Antti
    Aalto University.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Optimization Landscapes: A Topological Approach to Understanding Permutation-based Optimization ProblemsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Permutation-based optimization problemsare a class of NP-hard combinatorial problemsrepresenting many challenges in theory and practice.Their solution spaceconsists of all permutations $n!$of a given set of $n$ elements.Hence, for many real-world problemsthe solution spaceis too largeto even just visit every solution.The quality of a solutionis described by an objective function.A good understandingof the structures and symmetriesin this data is requiredto develop and steer heuristic algorithmsand other approaches to solving the underlying problem.We present a novel topological approachto exploring the objective functionsof permutation-based optimization problems.We infer the minima basinsand their propertiesfrom descending optimization paths.To deal with noise and general oversegmentation,we introduce an approachinspired by topological simplification of scalar fields.Based on this,we construct an edge-weighted graphapproximating the distances between basins,and visualize it using a force-directed layout,which shows the basins of local and global optimaorganized in a quasi-landscape.We show the variabilityof the solutions in a basinusing heat maps generated from permutation matrices.Our method is designed to be interactiveand read its input data as a streamfrom a simultaneously running simulation.We evaluate our method using different optimization problemsfrom both theory and practice.

  • 11.
    Palmas, Gregorio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Weinkauf, Tino
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Space Bundling for Continuous Parallel Coordinates2016In: Eurographics Proceedings, The Eurographics Association , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous Parallel Coordinates (CPC) are a visualization technique used to perform multivariate analysis of different scalar fields defined on thesame domain.While classic Parallel Coordinatesdraws a line for each sample point,a CPC visualization uses a density-based representation.An interesting possibility for the classic methodis to highlight higher-dimensional clustersusing edge bundling,where each line becomes a spline bent towards the centroid of the cluster.This often leads to expressive, illustrative visualizations.Unfortunately, bundling lines is not possible for CPC,as they are not involved in this method.In this paper,we propose a deformation of the visualization space for Continuous Parallel Coordinatesthat leads to similar results as those obtained through classic edge bundling.We achieve this by performing a curved-profile transformation in image space.The approach lends itself to a computationally lightweight GPU implementation.Furthermore, we provide intuitive interactionswith the bundled clusters.We show several examples of our technique applied to a commonly available data set.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf